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I'm trying to create a counter controlled while loop. Currently I'm having difficulty getting the counter to increase by 1 for each pass through off the loop.

I set my code to

int numberCounter = 0;  // Numbers 0 through 10.        
String head1 = "Number: " + numberCounter;      
String head2 = " Multiplied by 2: " + numberCounter * 2;        
String head3 = " Multiplied by 10:  " + numberCounter * 10;                      
int byTwo;     // Stores the number multiplied by 2.    
int byTen;     // Stores the number multiplied by 10.
final int NUM_LOOPS = 11; // Constant used to control loop.

     // This is the work done in the housekeeping() method
System.out.println("Numbers 0 through 10 multiplied by 2 and by 10" + "\n");
System.out.println(head1 + head2 + "\n");
System.out.println(head1 + head3 + "\n");
while (numberCounter != 10) numberCounter = numberCounter + 1;

System.out.println(head1 + head2 + "\n");
System.out.println(head1 + head3 + "\n");

but it just reads the 0 value and exits after one pass.

I expect each pass to add one to the counter, but it seems to stay at 0. I say that because the output reads:

Numbers 0 through 10 multiplied by 2 and by 10

Number: 0 Multiplied by 2: 0

Number: 0 Multiplied by 10: 0

Number: 0 Multiplied by 2: 0

Number: 0 Multiplied by 10: 0

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  • 2
    That should work (provided that numberCounter doesn't start with the value 10), you need to show us more of your code to see what goes wrong. – Joachim Sauer Nov 11 '19 at 15:39
  • 1
    That code should work. What do you mean "it just reads the 0 value"? – Carcigenicate Nov 11 '19 at 15:39
  • 3
    What makes you think that "but it just reads the 0 value and exits after one pass"? Use edit option to clarify your question. – Pshemo Nov 11 '19 at 15:41
  • Isn't this the exact use-case for a for loop? – charles-allen Nov 11 '19 at 15:51
  • It seems you are under impression that when you have String head1 = "Number: " + numberCounter; and later you change value of numberCounter then data held by head1 should also change/update. That is not true. Value of string is decided at time of its creation and never changes. Just like when you have int a =1; and later you write int b = a; your b will hold its own copy of value 1 which was held in a at that time. Even when you later assign to a some other value like a=3; b would still hold its own copy of 1. – Pshemo Nov 11 '19 at 16:25
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as mentioned in the comments, make sure your counter variable starts from 0 :

int numberCounter = 0;
while (numberCounter != 10) {
   System.out.println(numberCounter);
   numberCounter = numberCounter + 1; // or numberCounter++;
}

UPDATE

After you posted your full code, it seems clear that you expect that each iteration of your integer would change the value assigned to your Strings, eg head2 & head3. This is wrong. At the point you initialized these String variables your integer was converted to a String inside that variable (since you used string concatenation). To see the effect of the iterated integer, you can add the below println statements inside your loop, eg :

while (numberCounter != 10) {
     numberCounter = numberCounter + 1;
     System.out.println(" Multiplied by 2: " + numberCounter * 2);
     System.out.println(" Multiplied by 10: " + numberCounter * 10);
}
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  • I do have the number counter initialized to 0, I might have entered in something incorrectly, or the problem could be that I'm using an online compiler (work computer.) I just edited my question to include more code. – Edwin Salinas Nov 11 '19 at 16:05
  • That did it! I'm still trying to wrap my head around how it was wrong, but I think I'm getting it. One minor note is that now the count is starting at 1, so I initialized numberCounter to -1 so I can multiply by 0 first. Outside of that, this method was perfect! Thanks, @funkyjelly! – Edwin Salinas Nov 11 '19 at 16:54
  • @Edwin the proper way to see the 0 value effect of your integer would be to change the order inside the while loop : first do the prints (to see results for 0 value too) and then increment the value. Right now you first increment the value so you don't get to see the 0 – nullPointer Nov 12 '19 at 8:13

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