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I am trying to make a program, that will ask users for the length and width of a rectangle, where the length and width will be portrayed with a * symbol.The program actually works well, it's just adding an extra symbol, and I do not know why.

E.g, I enter 5 for the length , and 4 for the width, my output will end up looking like:

          xxxxxx
          x    x
          x    x
          x    x
          xxxxxx

These dimensions above me are actually 6x5, even though I put 5x4 in the program.

I would want the program to look like this, Expected output:

        xxxxx
        x   x
        x   x
        xxxxx

My code is:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class aps{
public static void main(String [] args){ 

    //Declaring variables
    int length, width;

    //Prompting user for length
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.print("Enter the length of your rectangle: ");
    length = scanner.nextInt();// integer i for rows(width)

    //Prompting user for width
    System.out.print("Enter the width of your rectangle: ");
    width = scanner.nextInt();//integer j for columns(length)

    //Processing
    for(int i = 0; i<=width; i++){  //first loop
        for(int j = 0; j<=length; j++){ //second loop
            if(i==0||j==0||j==length||i==width){
                System.out.print("*");
            }
            else{
                System.out.print(" ");
            }

        }// end of second loop

        System.out.println();

    } //end of first loop


    }
}
  • 2
    Where is it adding an extra symbol? You've shown us the expected output, but show us the actual output too. – kaya3 Nov 11 '19 at 18:21
  • @kaya3 The output is 6x5 not 5x4. – Max Vollmer Nov 11 '19 at 18:22
  • 2
    You wrote i<=width and j<=length. That means you go from 0 to 5 inclusive and from 0 to 4 inclusive. How many numbers are that? 6 and 5, not 5 and 4. (Hint: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) – Max Vollmer Nov 11 '19 at 18:22
  • 1
    If the problem is that the rectangle that gets printed is too wide and too tall, please clarify the question - "adding an extra symbol" doesn't really explain this. I understood the first block to be an example of the expected output. – kaya3 Nov 11 '19 at 18:24
  • @kaya3 Yes, sorry this is my second post on this website, still getting used to the format of the posts.Thank you. – Jeeven Nullatamby Nov 11 '19 at 20:06
1

If you want a for loop to run something n times, you need the for loop to be in the form for(int i=0; i < n; i++) or for(int i=1; i <= n; i++) instead of for(int i=0; i <= n; i++), which runs n+1 times (i.e once for 0, then n times from 1..n).

An easy fix for you would be to just get change the <= to < in your for loop conditions, as well as changing the if condition to reflect the change:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class aps{
public static void main(String [] args){ 

    //Declaring variables
    int length, width;

    //Prompting user for length
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.print("Enter the length of your rectangle: ");
    length = scanner.nextInt();// integer i for rows(width)

    //Prompting user for width
    System.out.print("Enter the width of your rectangle: ");
    width = scanner.nextInt();//integer j for columns(length)

    //Processing
    for(int i = 0; i<width; i++){  //first loop
        for(int j = 0; j<length; j++){ //second loop
            if(i==0||j==0||j==length-1||i==width-1){
                System.out.print("*");
            }
            else{
                System.out.print(" ");
            }

        }// end of second loop

        System.out.println();

    } //end of first loop


    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • When I change the conditions from <= to < it removes half of the rectangle. – Jeeven Nullatamby Nov 12 '19 at 17:56
  • @JeevenNullatamby you would need to change the if condition as well, I updated my answer to reflect that. – Samyok Nepal Nov 12 '19 at 23:04

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