5

I need to distribute a directory containing html files and images with my app.

The app has support for different languages. I have created a directory for each language and then pick the right one based on current locale:

NSString *language = [[NSLocale preferredLanguages] objectAtIndex:0];
NSString *path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"index" 
                                                 ofType:@"html" 
                                            inDirectory:[language stringByAppendingPathExtension:@"html"];];

if (![[NSFileManager defaultManager] fileExistsAtPath:path])
{
    // Fallback to english
    path = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"index" 
                                           ofType:@"html" 
                                      inDirectory:@"en.html"];
}

How can I better deal with this instead of having to do the above (which is a bit messy)?

I'm thinking perhaps using the xx.lproj directories for this somehow and putting a localized html directory in each xx.lproj directory and use NSBundle pathForResource to find the correct file. Couldn't get it to work though.

0
6

Using the xx.lproj folders with [NSBundle pathForResource:ofType:] is straight-forward.

You can add index.html to your Xcode's project file and then make it localizable from its "Get Info" window. Add another language like "de", and Xcode will copy index.html into the newly created de.lproj. If you remove that file, the app will fall back on the English version.

You can test it with logging:

NSLog([[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"index" ofType:@"html"]);
2
  • I'm surprised this isn't being up voted. If you use the path and URL methods of NSBundle, a lot of the hard work of figuring out your locale and region folders will be done for you automatically.
    – mahboudz
    Jun 7 '14 at 8:36
  • Because it doesn't work in XCode 6.3.2. That always returns nil, unfortunately.
    – Manuel M.
    Jun 15 '15 at 13:40
3

I too am unable to get this to work:

    NSLog([[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"index" ofType:@"html"]);

But this does, using the standard Xcode language.lproj structure (e.g., en.lproj):

    NSString *language = [[NSLocale preferredLanguages] objectAtIndex:0];
    NSString *htmlPath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"index" 
                  ofType:@"html" 
                  inDirectory:[language stringByAppendingPathExtension:@"lproj"]];

also removed extra ; in Martin's original question above ...

3

Extra tip: make sure that you remove the unlocalized versions of the files in your built product, otherwise pathForResource will find those files instead of the localized ones.

1

Why not the forLocalization way:

        htmlFile = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"myContent"
                                               ofType:@"html"
                                          inDirectory:@"de.lproj"
                                      forLocalization:@"de"];

This works fine here with Xcode 5.1.1 and iOS 7.1

Add the generalization of @Martin Wickman (with the fallback) and everything should be great.

0

You could use this:

NSString *filename = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"html_%@.html", NSLocalizedString(@"abbr", @"")];
1
  • Not really what I'm looking for. May 4 '11 at 9:43

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