1

I'm trying to run a code. i and i get two compilation errors: 1.Reference to System.out.println is ambiguous (conflict between method that gets char[] and a method that gets a String) 2.Cap#1 can't converted to T return st.pop()

import java.util.*;
public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Stack <Number> stackNumber = new Stack<Number>();
            Test t = new Test();
        t.setMethod(stackNumber,new Integer(3));
        System.out.println(t.getMethod(stackNumber));
    }

    public <T extends Number> void setMethod (Stack<? super Number>st,T t)
    {
     st.add(t);
    }   

    public <T>T getMethod (Stack<? extends Number >st)
    {
        return st.pop();
    } 
}   

I know that i can change getMethod signature to return Number and program will be compiled successfully but i want to understand why with current signature i'm getting compilation errors? AFAIK, T without bounds considered as Object and a function that declares to return Object can return any Object since Object is the "Father" of all classes (including Number). Can someone me what i'm dismissing here?

1

but i want to understand why with current signature i'm getting compilation errors?

The errors are both because <T> is determined at the call site.

Looking at compilation error 1:

Java selects the most specifically-applicable method. Any of the PrintStream.println methods that take a reference-typed parameter could be selected.

From JLS 15.12.2.5:

The informal intuition is that one method is more specific than another if any invocation handled by the first method could be passed on to the other one without a compile-time error.

Anything that you can pass to println(char[]) or println(String) can also be passed to println(Object), therefore the former methods are more specific than the latter. As such, these will be selected in preference to println(Object).

However, some things that can be passed to println(char[]) cannot be passed to println(String), therefore neither of those is more specific than the other, hence the ambiguous method call.


Now looking at compilation error 2:

public <T>T getMethod (Stack<? extends Number >st)
{
    return st.pop();
}

This method must be safe to invoke in all situations. You invoke it like this:

System.out.println(t.getMethod(stackNumber));

i.e. you treat the result simply like an object. But you could, legally, write this at the call site:

String s = t.getMethod(stackNumber);

It's hopefully clear that this would fail, because something popped out of a stack containing numbers can't be cast to a String.

Because the compiler can't guarantee that it will be called with a "safe" T, it's an error.

  • Thanks. But i still can't understand it. AFAIK T is erasure by O, so getMethod signature declare that it returns an Object Reference. So How returned typed can be considered as char[] or String. I can't understand, from the way i see the things only Object can be returned from getMethod . If we have a method with the following signature public Object helpMethod(), and we will call it from System.out.println() everything will work (even if helpMethod return a String or anything we want), So what is the different? – Eitanos30 Nov 12 '19 at 18:08
  • @Eitanos30 the erasure isn't relevant here. – Andy Turner Nov 12 '19 at 18:13
  • isn't it replace T with Object? – Eitanos30 Nov 12 '19 at 18:46
  • @Eitanos30 it is, but at a much later stage in the compilation process. If getMethod could only ever return Object (or, generally, the erasure of its bound), there would be no point in generics. – Andy Turner Nov 12 '19 at 18:48
  • Ok. Thank you!! – Eitanos30 Nov 12 '19 at 20:11
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Neither of your methods should be using wildcard captures, you have two methods that are generic against some T. Like,

public <T> void setMethod(Stack<T> st, T t) {
    st.add(t);
}

public <T> T getMethod(Stack<T> st) {
    return st.pop();
}

If you want to ensure that T must be a Number for some reason (I would just use Number then), you define it at T. Like,

public <T extends Number> void setMethod(Stack<T> st, T t) {
    st.add(t);
}

public <T extends Number> T getMethod(Stack<T> st) {
    return st.pop();
}
  • I said that I know that it can be implemented easily if I will change the signature. But I post the question to get an answer on a specific situation with wild card – Eitanos30 Nov 11 '19 at 23:57
  • Your "specific situation" is caused by having two unrelated generics: <T> and <? extends Number> --- you could also write public <T> T getMethod(Stack<? extends T> st) and public <T> void setMethod(Stack<? super T> st, T t) – Elliott Frisch Nov 12 '19 at 0:03
  • I describe why as I see the erasure way of work, I think it should work. Can you please explain what is wrong in the way i refer to the issue (T is replaced with Object) thus method can return any type). Again I’m not looking for alternative solution, it’s not a task. I’m trying you understand why specific code isn’t working although T is replaced by Object. The time is very late in my country so I may see your response only tomorrow. Thanks – Eitanos30 Nov 12 '19 at 0:10

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