2

trying to write a for loop function to determine the number of schools with room costs in column 34 higher than board cost in column 23.

numrows <- dim(schools)[1]
for(ii in 1:numrows){ 
  if(schools[ii, 34] > schools[ii, 23], na.rm = TRUE){
    nrow(numrows)
  }
} 

I'm getting the following error

Error in if (schools[ii, 34] > schools[ii, 23]) { : 
  missing value where TRUE/FALSE needed

I did notice that some of the board costs are missing and i'd like to omit those in the comparisons. Also I'm expecting just the number of rows that satisfy the condition.

7
  • Why not sum(schools[, 34] > schools[, 23])? No need for a for loop, as > is vectorised. Commented Nov 12, 2019 at 2:35
  • @MauritsEvers, I'm required to use a control flow approach
    – JanLawlee
    Commented Nov 12, 2019 at 2:47
  • But why? That's a very ineffective and non-R-typic approach. It would be an example of how not to code in R. Commented Nov 12, 2019 at 2:50
  • @MauritsEvers, Okay. So any insights on how to use any iteration/control flow approach other than a for loop?
    – JanLawlee
    Commented Nov 12, 2019 at 2:53
  • You're missing my point. There is no need for any iteration/control flow element here. One of R's strength is the fact that many operations are vectorised. Commented Nov 12, 2019 at 2:55

2 Answers 2

1

To further demonstrate my point, here is a simple example based on a 10,000-row sample data.frame

set.seed(2018)
df <- data.frame(one = runif(10^4), two = runif(10^4))

Running a microbenchmark analysis

library(microbenchmark)
res <- microbenchmark(
    vectorised = sum(df[, 1] > df[, 2]),
    for_loop = {
        ss <- 0
        for (i in seq_len(nrow(df))) if (df[i, 1] > df[i, 2]) ss <- ss + 1
        ss
    })

res
#    Unit: microseconds
#       expr        min        lq         mean      median          uq
# vectorised     59.681     65.13     78.33118     72.8305     77.9195
#   for_loop 346250.957 359535.08 398508.54996 379421.2305 426452.4265
#        max neval
#    152.172   100
# 608490.869   100

library(ggplot2)
autoplot(res)

enter image description here

Notice the four order of magnitude (!!!) difference (that's a factor of 10,000!) between the for loop and the vectorised operation. Neither surprising nor interesting.

0
1

The structure of the data leading to the error

Error in if (schools[ii, 34] > schools[ii, 23]) { : 
  missing value where TRUE/FALSE needed

occurs when one or both of the values in the comparison is NA, because the NA propagates through the comparison x > y, e.g.,

> test = 1 > NA
> test
[1] NA

and the flow control if (test) {} can't determine whether the test is TRUE (and so the code should be executed) or FALSE

> if (test) {}
Error in if (test) { : missing value where TRUE/FALSE needed

A simple vectorized solution isn't good enough

> set.seed(123)
> n = 10; x = sample(n); y = sample(n); y[5] = NA
> sum(x > y)
[1] NA

though the 'fix' is obvious and inexpensive

> sum(x > y, na.rm = TRUE)
[1] 3

The for loop also fails, but it is not possible (as in part of the original question) to simply add an na.rm = TRUE clause to the if statement

s = 0
for (i in seq_along(x)) {
    if (x[i] > y[i], na.rm = TRUE)
        s <- s + 1
}
s

because this is not syntactically valid

Error: unexpected ',' in:
"for (i in seq_along(x)) {
    if (x[i] > y[i],"

so a more creative solution needs to be found, e.g., testing whether the value of the comparison is actually TRUE

s <- 0
for (i in seq_along(x)) {
    if (isTRUE(x[i] > y[i]))
        s <- s + 1
}
s

Of course it is not useful to compare the performance of the incorrect code; one needs to write the correct solutions first

f1 <- function(x, y)
    sum(x > y, na.rm = TRUE)
f2 <- function(x, y) {
    s <- 0
    for (i in seq_along(x))
        if (isTRUE(x[i] > y[i]))
            s <- s + 1
    s
}

f1() seems much more compact and readable compared to f2(), but we need to make sure the results are sensible

> x > y
 [1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE    NA  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
> f1(x, y)
[1] 3

and the same

> identical(f1(x, y), f2(x, y))
[1] FALSE

Hey wait, what's going on? They look the same?

> f2(x, y)
[1] 3

Actually, the results are numerically equal, but f1() returns an integer value whereas f2() returns a numeric

> all.equal(f1(x, y), f2(x, y))
[1] TRUE
> class(f1(x, y))
[1] "integer"
> class(f2(x, y))
[1] "numeric"

and if we're comparing performance we really need the results to be identical -- no sense comparing apples and oranges. We can update f2() to return an integer by making sure the sum s is always an integer -- use a suffix L, e.g., 0L, to create an integer value

> class(0)
[1] "numeric"
> class(0L)
[1] "integer"

and make sure an integer 1L is added to s on each successful iteration

f2a <- function(x, y) {
    s <- 0L
    for (i in seq_along(x))
        if (isTRUE(x[i] > y[i]))
            s <- s + 1L
    s
}

We then have

> f2a(x, y)
[1] 3
> identical(f1(x, y), f2a(x, y))
[1] TRUE

and are now in a position to compare performance

> microbenchmark(f1(x, y), f2a(x, y))
Unit: microseconds
      expr    min      lq     mean median      uq    max neval
  f1(x, y)  1.740  1.8965  2.05500  2.023  2.0975  6.741   100
 f2a(x, y) 17.505 18.2300 18.67314 18.487 18.7440 34.193   100

Certainly f2a() is much slower, but for this size problem since the unit is 'microseconds' maybe this doesn't matter -- how do the solutions scale with problem size?

> set.seed(123)
> x = lapply(10^(3:7), sample)
> y = lapply(10^(3:7), sample)
> f = f1; microbenchmark(f(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f(x[[2]], y[[2]]), f(x[[3]], y[[3]]))
Unit: microseconds
              expr     min      lq      mean   median       uq      max neval
 f(x[[1]], y[[1]])   9.655   9.976  10.63951  10.3250  11.1695   17.098   100
 f(x[[2]], y[[2]])  76.722  78.239  80.24091  78.9345  79.7495  125.589   100
 f(x[[3]], y[[3]]) 764.034 895.075 914.83722 908.4700 922.9735 1106.027   100
> f = f2a; microbenchmark(f(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f(x[[2]], y[[2]]), f(x[[3]], y[[3]]))
Unit: milliseconds
              expr        min         lq       mean     median         uq
 f(x[[1]], y[[1]])   1.260307   1.296196   1.417762   1.338847   1.393495
 f(x[[2]], y[[2]])  12.686183  13.167982  14.067785  13.923531  14.666305
 f(x[[3]], y[[3]]) 133.639508 138.845753 144.152542 143.349102 146.913338
        max neval
   3.345009   100
  17.713220   100
 165.990545   100

They both scale linearly (not surprising) but even for lengths of 100000 f2a() doesn't seem too bad -- 1/6th of a second -- and might be a candidate in a situation where the vectorization obfuscated the code rather than clarified it. The cost of extracting individual elements from columns of a data.frame change this calculus, but also point to the value of operating on atomic vectors rather than complicated data structures.

For what it's worth one can think of worse implementations, especially

f3 <- function(x, y) {
    s <- logical(0)
    for (i in seq_along(x))
        s <- c(s, isTRUE(x[i] > y[i]))
    sum(s)
}

which scales quadratically

> f = f3; microbenchmark(f(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f(x[[2]], y[[2]]), f(x[[3]], y[[3]]), times = 1)
Unit: milliseconds
              expr          min           lq         mean       median
 f(x[[1]], y[[1]])     7.018899     7.018899     7.018899     7.018899
 f(x[[2]], y[[2]])   371.248504   371.248504   371.248504   371.248504
 f(x[[3]], y[[3]]) 42528.280139 42528.280139 42528.280139 42528.280139
           uq          max neval
     7.018899     7.018899     1
   371.248504   371.248504     1
 42528.280139 42528.280139     1

(because c(s, ...) copies all of s to add one element to it) and is a pattern found very often in people's code.

A second common slowdown is use of complicated data structures (like the data.frame) rather than simple data structures (like atomic vectors), e.g., comparing

f4 <- function(df) {
    s <- 0L
    x <- df[[1]]
    y <- df[[2]]
    for (i in seq_len(nrow(df))) {
        if (isTRUE(x[i] > y[i]))
            s <- s + 1L
    }
    s
}

f5 <- function(df) {
    s <- 0L
    for (i in seq_len(nrow(df))) {
        if (isTRUE(df[i, 1] > df[i, 2]))
            s <- s + 1L
    }
    s
}

with

> df <- Map(data.frame, x, y)
> identical(f1(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f4(df[[1]]))
[1] TRUE
> identical(f1(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f5(df[[1]]))
[1] TRUE
> microbenchmark(f1(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f2(x[[1]], y[[1]]), f4(df[[1]]), f5(df[[1]]), times = 10)
Unit: microseconds
                expr       min        lq       mean     median        uq
  f1(x[[1]], y[[1]])    10.042    10.324    13.3511    13.4425    14.690
 f2a(x[[1]], y[[1]])  1310.186  1316.869  1480.1526  1344.8795  1386.322
         f4(df[[1]])  1329.307  1336.869  1363.4238  1358.7080  1365.427
         f5(df[[1]]) 37051.756 37106.026 38187.8278 37876.0940 38416.276
       max neval
    20.753    10
  2676.030    10
  1439.402    10
 42292.588    10

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