2

In a high coupling environment, Changing one module affects another. Okay, but I can't see how is it possible (other than changing method signature or return type)?

Well, If I change one class then, it only way it can break the code in some other class if:

  1. If I suddenly change the return type of a method - then I would have to go to another class and fix the mismatch of types.
  2. If I change the method signature - then I would have to go to all dependent classes and change the method arguments everywhere the changed method is called.

For the same reason, It is good to depend on abstractions (interfaces), so that we have a guarantee that defined methods will be there.

Other than this, How else could changing a class affect another depending class?

  • Think about what would happen if you changed the size of a class. What would need to be updated? – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Nov 12 at 14:17
  • @NathanOliver-ReinstateMonica I am not very experienced. I don't know. What would need to be updated? – lynxx Nov 12 at 14:30
  • Changing behaviors also affect coupled classes. ;-) – Jarod42 Nov 12 at 14:32
  • 2
    Do you want the list about Java or C++? The languages have different features. – Öö Tiib Nov 12 at 14:38
  • 1
    Return null pointer instead of NullObject would probably lead to null pointer exception / crash / UB at usage. – Jarod42 Nov 12 at 14:46
4

Even though this is tagged "Java", I'm going to give a broader answer.

Coupling is expressed in terms of what assumption module A makes when it uses module B. The more assumptions module A makes, the more it is coupled with module B.

A module's API is basically the set of assumptions its consumers can make. Return type or method signature are just assumptions that the compiler can verify.

For example, SimCity was coupled with Windows 3.x memory allocator. The memory allocator had a contract that said you can assume X, Y, and Z, and that's it. Any other behavior cannot be assumed. But SimCity assumed it, and as a result, They could not change the memory allocator in Windows 95 (well, not while SimCity was executing).

Obviously that wasn't intentional coupling - any assumption about a module beyond its interface should be unintentional, but it's still an assumption.

Other examples include:

  • A password hashing API that tells its consumers what the hash algorithm is. Consumers might then hard-code the length of the hashed password into the database schema, which means that changing it to a more secure algorithm with longer hashes will only be possible after DB migrations.
  • Everyone who uses protobuf is coupled not only with its API, but also with its wire format. If Google wanted to change the wire format, it will break every deployment where either the producer or the consumer have not upgraded.
  • If you use e.g. GCC's GNU Compiler Extensions then you are coupled with GCC. If you want to (or have to) use another compiler, you better hope they also happen to implement the same extensions.
  • Every program is coupled to its programming language. For example, if Oracle wanted to change Java so that function overloading is not possible e.g. because of some fatal design bug that only manifests once in 100 years, all Java programs would stop compiling.
  • If you write a POSIX program you depend on the implementation being POSIX. If your POSIX programs uses POSIX basename(3), but your implementation breaks its semantics, then your program doesn't work on this implementation (GNU introduced a compatibility macro to avoid that).
3
+50

Consider you are an author of a class A, which does simple sorting of objects in ascending order by any attribute of the object.

Say, class B and C, use that functionality to process the list in certain way. Class B is strict and it wants sorting of objects in ascending order only. Class c, does not except the list on particular order.

Now, you make change in your class A, the functionality returns the objects sorted in descending fashion based on same/other attribute of the object.

Here, class B will say that you ha e changed the contract and need to adjust it's further processing.

Class C is okay here as it does not bother about the sorting.

Thus, changing the logic also affects the client who uses the existing functionality. Hence, while writing any independent module/library versioning is done.

1

The way you're thinking about the coupling problem is not quite right. It isn't about having to change one module because you changed another. It's about having to change many modules to accomplish a single task.

In a loosely coupled environment, each module has a well-defined job. There are things in the heads of the people who control it that each module is responsible for, so that when someone want something small (big wants break down into small wants), it gets done by changing one or at most a few modules.

In a highly coupled environment, the purpose of each module is difficult to define. When it gets documented, the docs use lots of words like "helps" or "allows this other module to", etc. The actual things that people want are implemented by coordinated behaviour among multiple modules, and to even know that one module behaves correctly, you have to consider many.

I hope you can see why maintaining a highly coupled system is a nightmare, and I hope you want to write loosely coupled systems instead.

One of the important parts of that is depending on abstractions. Those abstractions are often defined by interfaces, but what's important about them is not that they are interfaces, it's that they are abstract. It's easy to make a highly-coupled system where everything depends on interfaces. Then when you have to make a change you'll find yourself changing a lot of interfaces in addition to the modules that use them.

1

Even if interface didn't change, implementation can easily break your expectation, for example:

Old implementation method

public void doStuff(){
    //real doing stuuf...
}

New implementation method

public void doStuff(){
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Stop supporting doing stuff");
}

This is why you need to have regression testing when upgrading dependency modules

Also your dependency module have other dependencies that can break, for example break in lombok change with jackson dependency

1

One especially treacherous dependency is if a class' inner implementation calls internally a public method of the same class.

As a real-life example (this problem really occurs in the Collection framework, the HashSet.addAll() vs. ArrayList.addAll() implementation), imagine a class Container with some internal storage of Integers, having two public methods: addMultiple() and addSingle():

Implementation 1

class public Container {
    private Integer[] storage = new Integer[0];

    public void addMultiple(List<Integer> numbers) {
        // Simple, but slow implementation
        for (Integer number : numbers) {
            // !!! Here is the hidden problem !!!
            addSingle(number);
        }
    }

    public void addSingle(Integer number) {
        storage = copyOf​(storage, storage.length + 1)
        storage[storage.length - 1] = number;
    }
}

Now, you want to add some functionality, like multiplying each number with 2 before adding it to the container. And you decide for the stupid way of extending the Container class like this:

class public DoubleContainer extends Container {
    @Override
    public void addSingle(Integer number) {
        super addSingle(number * 2);
    }
}

You implement your DoubleContainer while Container has the Implementation 1. It works as you would expect, each number is doubled weather added either with addSingle() or with addMultiple().

And then suddenly, they change to the Implementation 2.

Implementation 2

class public Container {
    private Integer[] storage = new Integer[0];

    public void addMultiple(List<Integer> numbers) {
        // New, improved, faster implementation
        int position = storage.length;
        storage = copyOf​(storage, storage.length + numbers.getSize())
        for (Integer number : numbers) {
            storage[position++] = number;
        }
    }

    public void addSingle(Integer number) {
        storage = copyOf​(storage, storage.length + 1)
        storage[storage.length - 1] = number;
    }
}

Voilà: your code is broken. Numbers added via addAll() are not doubled. So you fix it: you override also the addAll() method:

class public DoubleContainer extends Container {
    @Override
    public void addMultiple(List<Integer> numbers) {
        List<Integer> doubledNumbers = numbers.stream()
            .map(number -> number * 2)
            .collect(Collectors.toList());
        super addMultiple(doubledNumbers);
    }

    @Override
    public void addSingle(Integer number) {
        super addSingle(number * 2);
    }
}

But you cannot sleep in peace either - what if they again revert to the old implementation? The numbers would be then quadrupled...

As you can see, the implementation 2 did not change the public methods. There can even be an interface, it does not change the case.

For the record: not that I would recommend using inheritance in this way (for more, read Effective Java by Joshua Bloch, Item 16: Favor composition over inheritance)! However, your question was "How else could changing a class affect another depending class?" and here is one of the possible answers.

0

Something not brought up in the other answers...

If a Class A is directly calling an implementation of another class B. When Class B is changed, it has to be recompiled, and since Class A has a direct coupling to B, Class A ALSO has to be re-compiled.

This reduces the independent deploy-ability of both classes.

Meaning, that if B is changed then A has to be recompiled to work properly.

This comes from Uncle Bob, you can read about it in one of his blog postings Microservices and Jars.

-1

Say you have two classes: Class A and Class B. Let's also say that Class A has a dependency of Class B amongst other fields, and uses some computation from B:

class A {
  private C myC;
  private B myB;
  ...
  private void someMethod() {
    String foo = myB.bar();
    myC.setField(foo);
  }
}

If you change something in B which directly (or indirectly) affects the result of bar(), then you could have all sorts of affects inside of A, as well as C. This doesn't have to be a change in return type, it could lead in an incorrect calculation which both A and C depend on.

Note that this example shows tight coupling, so something could change in any of these classes that could easily affect the others without you necessarily realizing.

  • Can you be more specific about the side effects and incorrect calculations. Your answer looks like a more general answer. – lynxx Nov 16 at 11:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.