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Due to a cyclic dependency with the video class i am forward declaring an class which is inside another namespace. This class is used for a shared pointer which is stored in the mmu class. Once i assign the shared pointer in the constructor of the class, it errors out with invalid use of incomplete type ‘using element_type = class graphic::Video {aka class graphic::Video}’ .

mmu.h

#pragma once
#include "../cartridge/cartridge.h"

/* forward decleration */
namespace graphic {
    class Video;
}

namespace memory {

    class Mmu {
        public:

            std::shared_ptr<Cartridge> cartridge;
            std::shared_ptr<graphic::Video> video;


            Mmu(std::shared_ptr<Cartridge>&, std::shared_ptr<graphic::Video>&);

    };
}

mmu.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "mmu.h"

namespace memory {
    Mmu::Mmu(std::shared_ptr<Cartridge> &_cartridge, std::shared_ptr<graphic::Video> &_vid)
    : video(_vid)
    {
        video->initializeColorPallete(); //errors
    }

caller.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include "caller.h"

Caller::Caller(std::vector<uint8_t> cartridgeData) 
    :cartridge(getCartridge(std::move(cartridgeData))),
     cpu(std::make_unique<cpu::CPU>(mmu)),
     video(std::make_shared<graphic::Video>(mmu, cpu)),
     mmu(std::make_shared<memory::Mmu>(cartridge, video))
    {

    }

video->initializeColorPallete(); errors out in the constructor.

  • 5
    Because graphic::Video is still an incomplete type at the time of calling the method on it. Include the actual class into your cpp file. – Hatted Rooster Nov 12 '19 at 16:27
  • 1
    Voting to close as a typo. You never included the file in mmu.cpp that defines Video. – NathanOliver Nov 12 '19 at 16:27
  • 1
    On top of that, you will need a destructor for class Mmu defined in the cpp for the std::shared_ptr<graphic::Video> member. The default destructor generated from declaration wouldn't know how to destruct a graphic::Video object. – ypnos Nov 12 '19 at 16:28
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    To say with different words what has been spoken: Forward declarations help to break out of cyclic dependencies in header files, but the full definition is still required to use this type. How else could compiler know if graphic::Video type has method initializeColorPallete, how many parameters it takes and what is it's return type. – Yksisarvinen Nov 12 '19 at 16:31
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    @parktomatomi Thanks, but you're not really answering my question. Try to have a class member unique_ptr<T> with forward-declared T. At least with current GCC, it will not compile (when the class is instantiated) without having a destructor declared that is defined somewhere where T is known (can be empty). With shared_ptr<T>, surprisingly for me, the problem does not exist. – ypnos Nov 12 '19 at 21:59
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So, just reiterating your requirements:

  • You don't know the full implementation of Video
  • You need to use Video in Mmu
  • Video needs an Mmu, directly or indirectly, creating a cyclic type dependency.

This is a good fit for a pure virtual interface. Make a contract with only the methods of Video needed by Mmu:

/* instead of a forward decleration */
namespace graphic {
    class IVideo {
    public:
        virtual void initializeColorPallete() = 0;
        virtual ~IVideo() = default; // always always always needed with interfaces
    };
}

Because these are virtual methods, a consumer of an IVideo doesn't need to know any details about the full type, because there will be a little table of function pointers at the top called a vtable.

Then Mmu will take an IVideo

namespace memory {
    class Mmu {
        public:

            std::shared_ptr<Cartridge> cartridge;
            std::shared_ptr<graphic::IVideo> video;
            Mmu(std::shared_ptr<Cartridge>, std::shared_ptr<graphic::IVideo>);
    };
}

And Video will implement IVideo:

// Mmu doesn't need to know anything about me
class Video : public graphic::IVideo {
    void initializeColorPallete() override { /* doin' its thing */ }
};

And you can pass a smart pointer of Video to the IVideo input of Mmu:

std::shared_ptr<graphic::IVideo> my_video = std::make_shared<Video>(/*...*/);

Because the destructor of IVideo is virtual, shared_ptr can safely delete it without know anything more about the implementation.

Another small tip: don't use lvalue references to smart pointers. shared_ptr depends on the copying of value types to count its dependencies. Same with unique_ptr which needs to be moved to be transferred.

Another small tip: cycles can be a bit dangerous with shared_ptr. If you pass a weak_ptr at some point in the cycle, that will prevent a memory leak. In general, prefer unique_ptr for ownership and dumb pointers/references for non-ownership but that's a different debate.

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