30

I have a csv of 7 million biodiversity records where taxonomy levels are as columns. For instance:

RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis
3,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Brassicales,Brassicaceae,Arabidopsis,Arabidopsis thaliana
4,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Fabales,Fabaceae,Phaseoulus,Phaseolus vulgaris

I want to create a visualization in D3, but data format must be a network, where each different value of column is a child of the previous column for a certain value. I need to go from the csv to something like this:

{
  name: 'Animalia',
  children: [{
    name: 'Chordata',
    children: [{
      name: 'Mammalia',
      children: [{
        name: 'Primates',
        children: 'Hominidae'
      }, {
        name: 'Carnivora',
        children: 'Canidae'
      }]
    }]
  }]
}

I haven't come up with an idea of how to do this without using a thousand for loops. Does anybody have a suggestion on how to create this network either on python or javascript?

1
  • Not related to your question, but just after I wrote my answer I noticed a nan for the Phylum containing Magnoliopsida. What's that nan? The Phylum is Anthophyta, or alternatively Magnolia (it's the old Phylum Angiospermae). Nov 21 '19 at 11:03
17

For creating the exact nested object you want we'll use a mix of pure JavaScript and a D3 method named d3.stratify. However, have in mind that 7 million rows (please see the post scriptum below) is a lot to compute.

It's very important to mention that, for this proposed solution, you'll have to separate the Kingdoms in different data arrays (for instance, using Array.prototype.filter). This restriction occurs because we need a root node, and in the Linnaean taxonomy there is no relationship between Kingdoms (unless you create "Domain" as a top rank, which will be the root for all eukaryotes, but then you'll have the same problem for Archaea and Bacteria).

So, suppose you have this CSV (I added some more rows) with just one Kingdom:

RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis latrans
3,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Cetacea,Delphinidae,Tursiops,Tursiops truncatus
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Pan,Pan paniscus

Based on that CSV, we'll create an array here named tableOfRelationships which, as the name implies, has the relationships between the ranks:

const data = d3.csvParse(csv);

const taxonomicRanks = data.columns.filter(d => d !== "RecordID");

const tableOfRelationships = [];

data.forEach(row => {
  taxonomicRanks.forEach((d, i) => {
    if (!tableOfRelationships.find(e => e.name === row[d])) tableOfRelationships.push({
      name: row[d],
      parent: row[taxonomicRanks[i - 1]] || null
    })
  })
});

For the data above, this is the tableOfRelationships:

+---------+----------------------+---------------+
| (Index) |         name         |    parent     |
+---------+----------------------+---------------+
|       0 | "Animalia"           | null          |
|       1 | "Chordata"           | "Animalia"    |
|       2 | "Mammalia"           | "Chordata"    |
|       3 | "Primates"           | "Mammalia"    |
|       4 | "Hominidae"          | "Primates"    |
|       5 | "Homo"               | "Hominidae"   |
|       6 | "Homo sapiens"       | "Homo"        |
|       7 | "Carnivora"          | "Mammalia"    |
|       8 | "Canidae"            | "Carnivora"   |
|       9 | "Canis"              | "Canidae"     |
|      10 | "Canis latrans"      | "Canis"       |
|      11 | "Cetacea"            | "Mammalia"    |
|      12 | "Delphinidae"        | "Cetacea"     |
|      13 | "Tursiops"           | "Delphinidae" |
|      14 | "Tursiops truncatus" | "Tursiops"    |
|      15 | "Pan"                | "Hominidae"   |
|      16 | "Pan paniscus"       | "Pan"         |
+---------+----------------------+---------------+

Have a look at null as the parent of Animalia: that's why I told you that you need to separate your dataset by Kingdoms, there can be only one null value in the whole table.

Finally, based on that table, we create the hierarchy using d3.stratify():

const stratify = d3.stratify()
    .id(function(d) { return d.name; })
    .parentId(function(d) { return d.parent; });

const hierarchicalData = stratify(tableOfRelationships);

And here is the demo. Open your browser's console (the snippet's one is not very good for this task) and inspect the several levels (children) of the object:

const csv = `RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis latrans
3,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Cetacea,Delphinidae,Tursiops,Tursiops truncatus
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Pan,Pan paniscus`;

const data = d3.csvParse(csv);

const taxonomicRanks = data.columns.filter(d => d !== "RecordID");

const tableOfRelationships = [];

data.forEach(row => {
  taxonomicRanks.forEach((d, i) => {
    if (!tableOfRelationships.find(e => e.name === row[d])) tableOfRelationships.push({
      name: row[d],
      parent: row[taxonomicRanks[i - 1]] || null
    })
  })
});

const stratify = d3.stratify()
  .id(function(d) {
    return d.name;
  })
  .parentId(function(d) {
    return d.parent;
  });

const hierarchicalData = stratify(tableOfRelationships);

console.log(hierarchicalData);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/d3/5.7.0/d3.min.js"></script>


PS: I don't know what kind of dataviz you'll create, but you really should avoid taxonomic ranks. The whole Linnaean taxonomy is outdated, we don't use ranks anymore: since the phylogenetic systematics was developed in mid-60's we use only taxa, without any taxonomic rank (evolutionary biology teacher here). Also, I'm quite curious about these 7 million rows, since we have described just over 1 million species!

1
  • 3
    .@gerardo Thanks for your answer, I'll see if it works in a sample of the 7M rows. The database contains repeated rows for many species. so the idea is to show how many records there are for a certain taxonomic rank. The idea is to create something similar to Mike Bostock's Zoomable Icicle Tree. Nov 14 '19 at 4:23
7
+250

It is easy to do exactly what you need using python and python-benedict library (it is open source on Github, note: I am the author):

Installation pip install python-benedict

from benedict import benedict as bdict

# data source can be a filepath or an url
data_source = """
RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis
3,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Brassicales,Brassicaceae,Arabidopsis,Arabidopsis thaliana
4,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Fabales,Fabaceae,Phaseoulus,Phaseolus vulgaris
"""
data_input = bdict.from_csv(data_source)
data_output = bdict()

ancestors_hierarchy = ['kingdom', 'phylum', 'class', 'order', 'family', 'genus', 'species']
for value in data_input['values']:
    data_output['.'.join([value[ancestor] for ancestor in ancestors_hierarchy])] = bdict()

print(data_output.dump())
# if this output is ok for your needs, you don't need the following code

keypaths = sorted(data_output.keypaths(), key=lambda item: len(item.split('.')), reverse=True)

data_output['children'] = []
def transform_data(d, key, value):
    if isinstance(value, dict):
        value.update({ 'name':key, 'children':[] })
data_output.traverse(transform_data)

for keypath in keypaths:
    target_keypath = '.'.join(keypath.split('.')[:-1] + ['children'])
    data_output[target_keypath].append(data_output.pop(keypath))

print(data_output.dump())

The first print output will be:

{
    "Animalia": {
        "Chordata": {
            "Mammalia": {
                "Carnivora": {
                    "Canidae": {
                        "Canis": {
                            "Canis": {}
                        }
                    }
                },
                "Primates": {
                    "Hominidae": {
                        "Homo": {
                            "Homo sapiens": {}
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    },
    "Plantae": {
        "nan": {
            "Magnoliopsida": {
                "Brassicales": {
                    "Brassicaceae": {
                        "Arabidopsis": {
                            "Arabidopsis thaliana": {}
                        }
                    }
                },
                "Fabales": {
                    "Fabaceae": {
                        "Phaseoulus": {
                            "Phaseolus vulgaris": {}
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The second printed output will be:

{
    "children": [
        {
            "name": "Animalia",
            "children": [
                {
                    "name": "Chordata",
                    "children": [
                        {
                            "name": "Mammalia",
                            "children": [
                                {
                                    "name": "Carnivora",
                                    "children": [
                                        {
                                            "name": "Canidae",
                                            "children": [
                                                {
                                                    "name": "Canis",
                                                    "children": [
                                                        {
                                                            "name": "Canis",
                                                            "children": []
                                                        }
                                                    ]
                                                }
                                            ]
                                        }
                                    ]
                                },
                                {
                                    "name": "Primates",
                                    "children": [
                                        {
                                            "name": "Hominidae",
                                            "children": [
                                                {
                                                    "name": "Homo",
                                                    "children": [
                                                        {
                                                            "name": "Homo sapiens",
                                                            "children": []
                                                        }
                                                    ]
                                                }
                                            ]
                                        }
                                    ]
                                }
                            ]
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "name": "Plantae",
            "children": [
                {
                    "name": "nan",
                    "children": [
                        {
                            "name": "Magnoliopsida",
                            "children": [
                                {
                                    "name": "Brassicales",
                                    "children": [
                                        {
                                            "name": "Brassicaceae",
                                            "children": [
                                                {
                                                    "name": "Arabidopsis",
                                                    "children": [
                                                        {
                                                            "name": "Arabidopsis thaliana",
                                                            "children": []
                                                        }
                                                    ]
                                                }
                                            ]
                                        }
                                    ]
                                },
                                {
                                    "name": "Fabales",
                                    "children": [
                                        {
                                            "name": "Fabaceae",
                                            "children": [
                                                {
                                                    "name": "Phaseoulus",
                                                    "children": [
                                                        {
                                                            "name": "Phaseolus vulgaris",
                                                            "children": []
                                                        }
                                                    ]
                                                }
                                            ]
                                        }
                                    ]
                                }
                            ]
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}
5

var log = console.log;
var data = `
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis
3,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Brassicales,Brassicaceae,Arabidopsis,Arabidopsis thaliana
4,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Fabales,Fabaceae,Phaseoulus,Phaseolus vulgaris`;
//make array of rows with array of values
data = data.split("\n").map(v=>v.split(","));
//init tree
var tree = {};
data.forEach(row=>{
    //set current = root of tree for every row
    var cur = tree; 
    var id = false;
    row.forEach((value,i)=>{
        if (i == 0) {
            //set id and skip value
            id = value;
            return;
        }
        //If branch not exists create. 
        //If last value - write id
        if (!cur[value]) cur[value] = (i == row.length - 1) ? id : {};
        //Move link down on hierarhy
        cur = cur[value];
    });
}); 
log("Tree:");
log(JSON.stringify(tree, null, "  "));

//Now you have hierarhy in tree and can do anything with it.
var toStruct = function(obj) {
    let ret = [];
    for (let key in obj) {
        let child = obj[key];
        let rec = {};
        rec.name = key;
        if (typeof child == "object") rec.children = toStruct(child);
        ret.push(rec);
    }
    return ret;
}
var struct = toStruct(tree);
console.log("Struct:");
console.log(struct);

5

This seems straightforward, so maybe I'm not understanding your problem.

The data structure you want is a nested set of dictionaries, key/value pairs. Your top level kingdom dictionary has a key for each of your kingdoms, whose values are phylum dictionaries. A phylum dictionary (for one kingdom) has a key for each phylum name and each key has a value that is a class dictionary, and so on.

To make it simple to code, your genus dictionaries will have a key for each species, but the values for the species will be empty dictionaries.

This should be what you want; no strange libraries required.

import csv

def read_data(filename):
    tree = {}
    with open(filename) as f:
        f.readline()  # skip the column headers line of the file
        for animal_cols in csv.reader(f):
            spot = tree
            for name in animal_cols[1:]:  # each name, skipping the record number
                if name in spot:  # The parent is already in the tree
                    spot = spot[name]  
                else:
                    spot[name] = {}  # creates a new entry in the tree
                    spot = spot[name]
    return tree

To test it, I used your data and pprint from the standard library.

from pprint import pprint
pprint(read_data('data.txt'))

getting

{'Animalia': {'Chordata': {'Mammalia': {'Carnivora': {'Canidae': {'Canis': {'Canis': {}}}},
                                        'Primates': {'Hominidae': {'Homo': {'Homo sapiens': {}}}}}}},
 'Plantae': {'nan': {'Magnoliopsida': {'Brassicales': {'Brassicaceae': {'Arabidopsis': {'Arabidopsis thaliana': {}}}},
                                       'Fabales': {'Fabaceae': {'Phaseoulus': {'Phaseolus vulgaris': {}}}}}}}}

Reading your question again, you might want a big table of pairs ('link from more general group', 'link to more specific group'). That is, 'Animalia' links to 'Animalia:Chordata' and 'Animalia:Chordata' links to 'Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia" etc. Unfortunately, the 'nan' in your data means you need full names at each link. If (parent, child) pairs are what you want, walk the tree this way:

def walk_children(tree, parent=''):
    for child in tree.keys():
        full_name = parent + ':' + child
        yield (parent, full_name)
        yield from walk_children(tree[child], full_name)

tree = read_data('data.txt')
for (parent, child) in walk_children(tree):
    print(f'parent="{parent}" child="{child}"')

giving:

parent="" child=":Animalia"
parent=":Animalia" child=":Animalia:Chordata"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates:Hominidae"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates:Hominidae" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates:Hominidae:Homo"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates:Hominidae:Homo" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Primates:Hominidae:Homo:Homo sapiens"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora:Canidae"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora:Canidae" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora:Canidae:Canis"
parent=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora:Canidae:Canis" child=":Animalia:Chordata:Mammalia:Carnivora:Canidae:Canis:Canis"
parent="" child=":Plantae"
parent=":Plantae" child=":Plantae:nan"
parent=":Plantae:nan" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales:Brassicaceae"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales:Brassicaceae" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales:Brassicaceae:Arabidopsis"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales:Brassicaceae:Arabidopsis" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Brassicales:Brassicaceae:Arabidopsis:Arabidopsis thaliana"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales:Fabaceae"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales:Fabaceae" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales:Fabaceae:Phaseoulus"
parent=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales:Fabaceae:Phaseoulus" child=":Plantae:nan:Magnoliopsida:Fabales:Fabaceae:Phaseoulus:Phaseolus vulgaris"
2
  • This doesn't return a nested dict with name and children as requested in the question. Nov 21 '19 at 13:37
  • No it doesn't. What was requested was "something like this"; I take that as trying to find the idea data structure. One could just construct a custom structure by walking the tree, a four line exercise. Nov 21 '19 at 15:38
3

In Python, one way to encode a tree is to use a dict, where the keys represent nodes and the associated value is the node's parent:

{'Homo sapiens': 'Homo',
 'Canis': 'Canidae',
 'Arabidopsis thaliana': 'Arabidopsis',
 'Phaseolus vulgaris': 'Phaseoulus',
 'Homo': 'Hominidae',
 'Arabidopsis': 'Brassicaceae',
 'Phaseoulus': 'Fabaceae',
 'Hominidae': 'Primates',
 'Canidae': 'Carnivora',
 'Brassicaceae': 'Brassicales',
 'Fabaceae': 'Fabales',
 'Primates': 'Mammalia',
 'Carnivora': 'Mammalia',
 'Brassicales': 'Magnoliopsida',
 'Fabales': 'Magnoliopsida',
 'Mammalia': 'Chordata',
 'Magnoliopsida': 'nan',
 'Chordata': 'Animalia',
 'nan': 'Plantae',
 'Animalia': None,
 'Plantae': None}

An advantage of this is that you ensure the nodes are unique, since dicts can't have duplicate keys.

If you want to encode a more general directed graph instead (i.e., nodes can have more than one parent), you can use lists for values and have the represent children (or parents, I suppose):

{'Homo': ['Homo sapiens', 'ManBearPig'],
'Ursus': ['Ursus arctos', 'ManBearPig'],
'Sus': ['ManBearPig']}

You could do something similar with Objects in JS, substituting Arrays for lists, if necessary.

Here's the Python code I used to create the first dict above:

import csv

ROWS = []
# Load file: tbl.csv
with open('tbl.csv', 'r') as in_file:
    csvreader = csv.reader(in_file)

    # Ignore leading row numbers
    ROWS = [row[1:] for row in csvreader]
    # Drop header row
    del ROWS[0]

# Build dict
mytree = {row[i]: row[i-1] for row in ROWS for i in range(len(row)-1, 0, -1)}
# Add top-level nodes
mytree = {**mytree, **{row[0]: None for row in ROWS}}
2

Probably the simplest way turning your data into a hierarchy is making use of D3's built-in nesting operator d3.nest():

Nesting allows elements in an array to be grouped into a hierarchical tree structure;

By registering key functions via nest.key() you can easily specify the structure of your hierarchy. Much like Gerardo laid out in his answer you can use the .columns property exposed on the data array after parsing your CSV to automate generating these key functions. The entire code boils down to the following lines:

const nester = d3.nest();                             // Create a nest operator
const [, ...taxonomicRanks] = data.columns;           // Get rid of the RecordID property
taxonomicRanks.forEach(r => nester.key(d => d[r]));   // Register key functions
const nest = nester.entries(data);                    // Calculate hierarchy

Note, however, that the resulting hierarchy does not exactly resemble the structure requested in your question as the objects are { key, values } instead of { name, children }; by the way, this similarly holds true for Gerardo's answer. This doesn't hurt for both answers, though, as the results can be congested by d3.hierarchy() by specifying a children accessor function:

d3.hierarchy(nest, d => d.values)   // Second argument is the children accessor

The following demo puts all the parts together:

const csv = `RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis latrans
3,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Cetacea,Delphinidae,Tursiops,Tursiops truncatus
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Pan,Pan paniscus`;

const data = d3.csvParse(csv);

const nester = d3.nest();
const [, ...taxonomicRanks] = data.columns;
taxonomicRanks.forEach(r => nester.key(d => d[r]));
const nest = nester.entries(data);

console.log(nest);

const hierarchy = d3.hierarchy(nest, d => d.values);

console.log(hierarchy);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/d3/5.12.0/d3.js"></script>

You might also want to have a look at d3.nest() key and values conversion to name and children in case you feel the need to have exactly your posted structure.

4
  • Enjoy d3.nest while it lasts: it will be deprecated soon. Nov 21 '19 at 0:53
  • @GerardoFurtado That was my own first thought. However, I couldn’t find any reference backing this assumption. I thought I had read about its removal and was even surprised to still find it contained in the bundle. d3-collection is archived, yet there is no deprecation note on it. Do you have any reliable information on this matter? Nov 21 '19 at 6:53
  • That's for v6, look here. Look at "d3-collection [Removed!]". Nov 21 '19 at 6:57
  • @GerardoFurtado No, that wasn’t the reference I had in mind. Still, it answers my question, sadly. Nov 21 '19 at 7:03
1

A fun challenge. Try this javascript code. I use Lodash's set for simplicity.

import { set } from 'lodash'

const csvString = `RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
    1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
    2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis
    3,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Brassicales,Brassicaceae,Arabidopsis,Arabidopsis thaliana
    4,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Fabales,Fabaceae,Phaseoulus,Phaseolus vulgaris`

// First create a quick lookup map
const result = csvString
  .split('\n') // Split for Rows
  .slice(1) // Remove headers
  .reduce((acc, row) => {
    const path = row
      .split(',') // Split for columns
      .filter(item => item !== 'nan') // OPTIONAL: Filter 'nan'
      .slice(1) // Remove record id
    const species = path.pop() // Pull out species (last entry)
    set(acc, path, species)
    return acc
  }, {})

console.log(JSON.stringify(result, null, 2))

// Then convert to the name-children structure by recursively calling this function
const convert = (obj) => {
  // If we're at the end of our chain, end the chain (children is empty)
  if (typeof obj === 'string') {
    return [{
      name: obj,
      children: [],
    }]
  }
  // Else loop through each entry and add them as children
  return Object.entries(obj)
    .reduce((acc, [key, value]) => acc.concat({
      name: key,
      children: convert(value), // Recursive call
    }), [])
}

const result2 = convert(result)

console.log(JSON.stringify(result2, null, 2))

This produces the final result (similar) to what you want.

[
  {
    "name": "Animalia",
    "children": [
      {
        "name": "Chordata",
        "children": [
          {
            "name": "Mammalia",
            "children": [
              {
                "name": "Primates",
                "children": [
                  {
                    "name": "Hominidae",
                    "children": [
                      {
                        "name": "Homo",
                        "children": [
                          {
                            "name": "Homo sapiens",
                            "children": []
                          }
                        ]
                      }
                    ]
                  }
                ]
              },
              {
                "name": "Carnivora",
                "children": [
                  {
                    "name": "Canidae",
                    "children": [
                      {
                        "name": "Canis",
                        "children": [
                          {
                            "name": "Canis",
                            "children": []
                          }
                        ]
                      }
                    ]
                  }
                ]
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    "name": "Plantae",
    "children": [
      {
        "name": "Magnoliopsida",
        "children": [
          {
            "name": "Brassicales",
            "children": [
              {
                "name": "Brassicaceae",
                "children": [
                  {
                    "name": "Arabidopsis",
                    "children": [
                      {
                        "name": "Arabidopsis thaliana",
                        "children": []
                      }
                    ]
                  }
                ]
              }
            ]
          },
          {
            "name": "Fabales",
            "children": [
              {
                "name": "Fabaceae",
                "children": [
                  {
                    "name": "Phaseoulus",
                    "children": [
                      {
                        "name": "Phaseolus vulgaris",
                        "children": []
                      }
                    ]
                  }
                ]
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
]
1

In fact, @Charles Merriam its solution is very elegant.

If you want to make a result to same as the question, then try as following.

from io import StringIO
import csv


CSV_CONTENTS = """RecordID,kingdom,phylum,class,order,family,genus,species
1,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Primates,Hominidae,Homo,Homo sapiens
2,Animalia,Chordata,Mammalia,Carnivora,Canidae,Canis,Canis
3,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Brassicales,Brassicaceae,Arabidopsis,Arabidopsis thaliana
4,Plantae,nan,Magnoliopsida,Fabales,Fabaceae,Phaseoulus,Phaseolus vulgaris
"""


def recursive(dict_data):
    lst = []
    for key, val in dict_data.items():
        children = recursive(val)
        lst.append(dict(name=key, children=children))
    return lst


def main():
    with StringIO() as io_f:
        io_f.write(CSV_CONTENTS)
        io_f.seek(0)
        io_f.readline()  # skip the column headers line of the file
        result_tree = {}
        for row_data in csv.reader(io_f):
            cur_dict = result_tree  # cursor, back to root
            for item in row_data[1:]:  # each item, skip the record number
                if item not in cur_dict:
                    cur_dict[item] = {}  # create new dict
                    cur_dict = cur_dict[item]
                else:
                    cur_dict = cur_dict[item]

    # change answer format
    result_list = []
    for cur_kingdom_name in result_tree:
        result_list.append(dict(name=cur_kingdom_name, children=recursive(result_tree[cur_kingdom_name])))

    # Optional
    import json
    from os import startfile
    output_file = 'result.json'
    with open(output_file, 'w') as f:
        json.dump(result_list, f)
    startfile(output_file)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.