-2

Write a program that asks a user to input a string. Then asks a user to type in an index value(integer). You will use the charAt( ) method from the string class to find and output the character referenced by that index. Allow the user to repeat these actions by placing this in a loop until the user gives you an empty string. Now realize that If we call the charAt method with a bad value (a negative value or a integer larger than the size of the string) an exception will be thrown. Add the code to catch this exception, output a warning message and then continue with the loop

import java.util.Scanner;

class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("");
        String s;
        int ind;
        Scanner sc=new Scanner(System.in);
        while(sc.hasNext())
        {
            s=sc.next();
            if(s.length()==0)
                break;
            ind=sc.nextInt();
            try {
                char ch=s.charAt(ind);
                System.out.println("Character is "+ch);
            }
            catch(Exception e) {
                System.out.println("Bad index Error!");
            }
        }
    }
}
3

Yes. You could rely on assignment evaluating to the assigned value. Also, call Scanner.hasNextInt() before calling Scanner.nextInt(). Like,

System.out.println();
String s;
Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
while (sc.hasNext() && !(s = sc.next()).isEmpty()) {
    if (sc.hasNextInt()) {
        int ind = sc.nextInt();
        try {
            char ch = s.charAt(ind);
            System.out.println("Character is " + ch);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("Bad index Error!");
        }
    }
}
  • Thankyou so much! – vRUs Nov 13 '19 at 14:33
3

There is a bug; sc.next() cannot return an empty string in this code. Try editing it this way:

while(sc.hasNext()) {
    s = sc.next();
    if(s.length() == 0) {
        System.out.println("Woah, Nelly!");
        break;
    }
    // ...
}

See if you can get the program to print "Woah, Nelly!" by entering a blank line, or anything else. I can't, and assuming I understand the documentation correctly, it is impossible for the if condition to ever be true here (emphasis mine):

Depending upon the type of delimiting pattern, empty tokens may be returned. For example, the pattern "\\s+" will return no empty tokens since it matches multiple instances of the delimiter. The delimiting pattern "\s" could return empty tokens since it only passes one space at a time.

This pattern "\\s+" is the default one, and you haven't set a different one, so your scanner should never return an empty token. So the strict answer to "is there a way to write this program without the break statement?" is: yes, you can just delete the if(...) break; code and it doesn't change the behaviour in any way.

However, that's not really a solution to your problem because it doesn't give the user a way to exit the program. You should use nextLine() instead of next() to allow reading a blank line from the user.

  • 2
    so sad that "Woah, Nelly!" can not be printed – Scary Wombat Nov 13 '19 at 2:03
  • I looked over it. Thankyou! – vRUs Nov 13 '19 at 14:09

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