7

i'm trying to print "p" to the screen every second.

when I run this:

while (true)
    Thread.Sleep(1000); 
    Console.WriteLine("p");

it doesn't print at all. But when I run this:

while (true)
    Console.WriteLine("p");
    Thread.Sleep(1000); 

Its printing without waiting at all. Can somebody please explain this to me and suggest a fix?

12
  • 12
    And that is why you should use braces with your whiles.
    – GSerg
    Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 15:27
  • 2
    You are missing { } around the loop. There's only one statement in the body in either case. First loop corresponds to infinite wait, 1 second at a time. Second doesn't wait and prints continuously. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 15:27
  • 1
    @avrum when you don't use braces only the line directly after is included in the loop. Same thing for if statements or anything else where braces are optional.
    – Nick Henry
    Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 15:31
  • 4
    @CaseyCrookston: The problem is not that it is a novice question. The problem is that it shows no effort; the question could have been answered by reading any introductory text, the C# specification, the online documentation, and so on. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 15:39
  • 1
    @CaseyCrookston: First off, I didn't downvote, and I did leave a comment. And an answer. But more importantly, you and I may disagree as to the principle usefulness of the downvote. The downvote is not a useful way to send a message to the original poster that their question is bad, yes, I agree. It is useful to warn others away from the question so that well-meaning, helpful people do not waste their time dealing with badly-asked questions. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 15:45

2 Answers 2

14

You are not looping the whole code

This :

while (true)
    Thread.Sleep(1000); 
    Console.WriteLine("p");

Is the same as this :

while (true)
{
    Thread.Sleep(1000); 
}
Console.WriteLine("p");

You need to explicitly set your braces around all the lines you want the loop to perform otherwise it only loop on the next instruction.

Something like this is what you are looking for :

while (true)
{
    Thread.Sleep(1000); 
    Console.WriteLine("p");
}
14

why didn't it work without braces?

C# is not Python. In Python, program structure is indicated by spaces. In C# whitespace is ignored entirely and program structure is determined by the grammar of the language.

In C# a block of the form { any number of statements } is itself a statement.

The grammar of while is

while( an expression that can be evaluated to bool ) 
    a single statement

But since { ... } is a single statement, if you want multiple statements in the body of your while, or if, or for or foreach and so on, you use a block.

Incidentally, you should not be using Thread.Sleep in the first place. It should only be used in testing code. Threads are expensive program resources; do not pay them to sleep! If you want to introduce a delay, then there are two things to do. In an event-driven program, start a timer and then handle the timer event when it goes off. Or, make your program asynchronous and await a Task.Delay. Sleeping is a bad practice and indicates that there is some flaw in your program design.

Now, you might say, hey, this is a console program and I genuinely want to introduce a delay in my user experience, and I don't have any events processing in the background, and so on, so why not Sleep? And I can understand that argument; it is convenient. However, (1) get in good habits now while you are still a beginner and you won't have to break them later, and (2) programs evolve. At some point you're going to want to write a program that stays interactive and responds to user keypresses, or network traffic, or some other such thing, while the UI is paused; if your threads are asleep, they're not responding to those events.

5
  • 1
    Is sensitivity to file formatting (white spaces, tabs, etc) a good or bad thing? In other words is C# > Python? ;)
    – Sinatr
    Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 16:10
  • 1
    @Sinatr: In my shop I have a claw hammer, a ball peen hammer, a tack hammer, a roofing hammer, a deadfall hammer, a rubber hammer, a framing hammer. Which one of those hammers is the good one and which one is the bad one? If you can answer that question, I think you'll find it answers your question too. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 16:20
  • 1
    I know you have to be careful.. so C# is the hammer! Cool. Thanks.
    – Sinatr
    Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 16:34
  • 3
    @Sinatr: My point is that tools are not good or bad, period. They are good or bad at achieving particular goals. The goals of C# developers and the goals of Python developers are different, so evaluating which one is better needs to have a clear goal stated, and a clear metric for betterness. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 16:44
  • 1
    @Sinatr: To address your point more directly though: when I first heard of Python I thought that significant whitespace was crazy. Now, having written several code formatters and having learned how difficult it is to make a formatter than handles arbitrary comments and whitespace, I am much more sympathetic to the position that a language should have a default style. The hard part of programming is not the part where you figure out where to put the spaces and braces, so let's make languages that do not impose that burden on developers. Commented Nov 13, 2019 at 19:32

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