134

For caching purposes I need to generate a cache key from GET arguments which are present in a dict.

Currently I'm using sha1(repr(sorted(my_dict.items()))) (sha1() is a convenience method that uses hashlib internally) but I'm curious if there's a better way.

  • That seems good to me. – Devin Jeanpierre May 4 '11 at 13:22
  • 3
    this might not work with nested dict. shortest solution is to use json.dumps(my_dict, sort_keys=True) instead, which will recurse into dict values. – Andrey Fedorov Apr 8 '14 at 19:15
  • 2
    FYI re: dumps, stackoverflow.com/a/12739361/1082367 says "The output from pickle is not guaranteed to be canonical for similar reasons to dict and set order being non-deterministic. Don't use pickle or pprint or repr for hashing." – Matthew Cornell Dec 16 '14 at 12:49
  • sort the dict keys, not the items, i would also send the keys to the hash function. – nyuwec May 26 '16 at 12:59
  • 1
    Interesting backstory about hashing mutable data structures (like dictionaries): python.org/dev/peps/pep-0351 was proposed to allow arbitrarily freezing objects, but rejected. For rationale, see this thread in python-dev: mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2006-February/060793.html – FluxLemur Mar 29 '18 at 16:47

11 Answers 11

99

If your dictionary is not nested, you could make a frozenset with the dict's items and use hash():

hash(frozenset(my_dict.items()))

This is much less computationally intensive than generating the JSON string or representation of the dictionary.

UPDATE: Please see the comments below, why this approach might not produce a stable result.

  • 9
    This didn't work for me with a nested dictionary. I haven't tried the solution below (too complicated). The OP's solution works perfectly fine. I substituted sha1 with hash to save an import. – spatel Jan 18 '12 at 7:51
  • 9
    @Ceaser That won't work because tuple implies ordering but dict items are unordered. frozenset is better. – Antimony Jul 30 '12 at 11:55
  • 25
    Beware of the built-in hash if something needs to be consistent across different machines. Implementations of python on cloud platforms like Heroku and GAE will return different values for hash() on different instances making it useless for anything that must be shared between two or more "machines" (dynos in the case of heroku) – Ben Roberts Apr 22 '15 at 22:40
  • 6
    It might be interesting the hash() function does not produce a stable output. This means that, given the same input, it returns different results with different instances of the same python interpreter. To me, it looks like some sort of seed value is generated every time the interpreter is started. – Hermann Schachner May 28 '15 at 11:03
  • 7
    expected. the seed is introduced for security reason as far as I remember to add some kind of memory randomization. So you cannot expect the hash to be the same between two python processes – Nikokrock May 29 '15 at 13:03
118

Using sorted(d.items()) isn't enough to get us a stable repr. Some of the values in d could be dictionaries too, and their keys will still come out in an arbitrary order. As long as all the keys are strings, I prefer to use:

json.dumps(d, sort_keys=True)

That said, if the hashes need to be stable across different machines or Python versions, I'm not certain that this is bulletproof. You might want to add the separators and ensure_ascii arguments to protect yourself from any changes to the defaults there. I'd appreciate comments.

  • 5
    This is just being paranoid, but JSON allow most characters to show up in strings without any literal escaping, so the encoder gets to make some choices about whether to escape characters or just pass them through. The risk then is that different versions (or future versions) of the encoder could make different escaping choices by default, and then your program would compute different hash values for the same dictionary in different environments. The ensure_ascii argument would protect against this entirely hypothetical problem. – Jack O'Connor Apr 9 '14 at 4:31
  • 4
    I tested the performance of this with different dataset, it's much much faster than make_hash. gist.github.com/charlax/b8731de51d2ea86c6eb9 – charlax Sep 18 '14 at 22:33
  • 2
    @charlax ujson doesn't guarantee the order of the dict pairs, so it's not safe to do that – arthurprs Jul 3 '15 at 12:48
  • 10
    This solution only works as long as all keys are strings, e.g. json.dumps({'a': {(0, 5): 5, 1: 3}}) fails. – kadee Jun 1 '16 at 11:01
  • 3
    @LorenzoBelli, you can overcome that by adding default=str to the dumps command. Seems to work nicely. – mlissner May 4 '18 at 23:10
59

EDIT: If all your keys are strings, then before continuing to read this answer, please see Jack O'Connor's significantly simpler (and faster) solution (which also works for hashing nested dictionaries).

Although an answer has been accepted, the title of the question is "Hashing a python dictionary", and the answer is incomplete as regards that title. (As regards the body of the question, the answer is complete.)

Nested Dictionaries

If one searches Stack Overflow for how to hash a dictionary, one might stumble upon this aptly titled question, and leave unsatisfied if one is attempting to hash multiply nested dictionaries. The answer above won't work in this case, and you'll have to implement some sort of recursive mechanism to retrieve the hash.

Here is one such mechanism:

import copy

def make_hash(o):

  """
  Makes a hash from a dictionary, list, tuple or set to any level, that contains
  only other hashable types (including any lists, tuples, sets, and
  dictionaries).
  """

  if isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)):

    return tuple([make_hash(e) for e in o])    

  elif not isinstance(o, dict):

    return hash(o)

  new_o = copy.deepcopy(o)
  for k, v in new_o.items():
    new_o[k] = make_hash(v)

  return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items()))))

Bonus: Hashing Objects and Classes

The hash() function works great when you hash classes or instances. However, here is one issue I found with hash, as regards objects:

class Foo(object): pass
foo = Foo()
print (hash(foo)) # 1209812346789
foo.a = 1
print (hash(foo)) # 1209812346789

The hash is the same, even after I've altered foo. This is because the identity of foo hasn't changed, so the hash is the same. If you want foo to hash differently depending on its current definition, the solution is to hash off whatever is actually changing. In this case, the __dict__ attribute:

class Foo(object): pass
foo = Foo()
print (make_hash(foo.__dict__)) # 1209812346789
foo.a = 1
print (make_hash(foo.__dict__)) # -78956430974785

Alas, when you attempt to do the same thing with the class itself:

print (make_hash(Foo.__dict__)) # TypeError: unhashable type: 'dict_proxy'

The class __dict__ property is not a normal dictionary:

print (type(Foo.__dict__)) # type <'dict_proxy'>

Here is a similar mechanism as previous that will handle classes appropriately:

import copy

DictProxyType = type(object.__dict__)

def make_hash(o):

  """
  Makes a hash from a dictionary, list, tuple or set to any level, that 
  contains only other hashable types (including any lists, tuples, sets, and
  dictionaries). In the case where other kinds of objects (like classes) need 
  to be hashed, pass in a collection of object attributes that are pertinent. 
  For example, a class can be hashed in this fashion:

    make_hash([cls.__dict__, cls.__name__])

  A function can be hashed like so:

    make_hash([fn.__dict__, fn.__code__])
  """

  if type(o) == DictProxyType:
    o2 = {}
    for k, v in o.items():
      if not k.startswith("__"):
        o2[k] = v
    o = o2  

  if isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)):

    return tuple([make_hash(e) for e in o])    

  elif not isinstance(o, dict):

    return hash(o)

  new_o = copy.deepcopy(o)
  for k, v in new_o.items():
    new_o[k] = make_hash(v)

  return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items()))))

You can use this to return a hash tuple of however many elements you'd like:

# -7666086133114527897
print (make_hash(func.__code__))

# (-7666086133114527897, 3527539)
print (make_hash([func.__code__, func.__dict__]))

# (-7666086133114527897, 3527539, -509551383349783210)
print (make_hash([func.__code__, func.__dict__, func.__name__]))

NOTE: all of the above code assumes Python 3.x. Did not test in earlier versions, although I assume make_hash() will work in, say, 2.7.2. As far as making the examples work, I do know that

func.__code__ 

should be replaced with

func.func_code
  • isinstance takes a sequence for the second argument, so isinstance(o, (set, tuple, list)) would work. – Xealot Feb 13 '13 at 1:42
  • @Xealot Great thanks for that. Updated. – jomido Feb 13 '13 at 13:50
  • thanks for making me realize frozenset could consistently hash querystring parameters :) – Xealot Feb 14 '13 at 14:26
  • 1
    The items need to be sorted in order to create the same hash if the dict item order is different but the key values aren't -> return hash(tuple(frozenset(sorted(new_o.items())))) – Bas Koopmans Oct 28 '13 at 13:11
  • Nice! I also added a call to hash around lists and tuples. Otherwise it takes my lists of integers that happen to be values in my dictionary, and returns back lists of hashes, which is not what I want. – osa Jan 7 '15 at 23:09
12

Here is a clearer solution.

def freeze(o):
  if isinstance(o,dict):
    return frozenset({ k:freeze(v) for k,v in o.items()}.items())

  if isinstance(o,list):
    return tuple([freeze(v) for v in o])

  return o


def make_hash(o):
    """
    makes a hash out of anything that contains only list,dict and hashable types including string and numeric types
    """
    return hash(freeze(o))  
8

The code below avoids using the Python hash() function because it will not provide hashes that are consistent across restarts of Python (see hash function in Python 3.3 returns different results between sessions). make_hashable() will convert the object into nested tuples and make_hash_sha256() will also convert the repr() to a base64 encoded SHA256 hash.

import hashlib
import base64

def make_hash_sha256(o):
    hasher = hashlib.sha256()
    hasher.update(repr(make_hashable(o)).encode())
    return base64.b64encode(hasher.digest()).decode()

def make_hashable(o):
    if isinstance(o, (tuple, list)):
        return tuple((make_hashable(e) for e in o))

    if isinstance(o, dict):
        return tuple(sorted((k,make_hashable(v)) for k,v in o.items()))

    if isinstance(o, (set, frozenset)):
        return tuple(sorted(make_hashable(e) for e in o))

    return o

o = dict(x=1,b=2,c=[3,4,5],d={6,7})
print(make_hashable(o))
# (('b', 2), ('c', (3, 4, 5)), ('d', (6, 7)), ('x', 1))

print(make_hash_sha256(o))
# fyt/gK6D24H9Ugexw+g3lbqnKZ0JAcgtNW+rXIDeU2Y=
  • 1
    make_hash_sha256(((0,1),(2,3)))==make_hash_sha256({0:1,2:3})==make_hash_sha256({2:3,0:1})!=make_hash_sha256(((2,3),(0,1))). This isn't quite the solution I'm looking for, but it is a nice intermediate. I'm thinking of adding type(o).__name__ to the beginning of each of the tuples to force differentiation. – Poik Sep 17 '17 at 20:01
  • If you want to sort the list as well : tuple(sorted((make_hashable(e) for e in o))) – Suraj Aug 13 at 15:12
  • make_hash_sha256() - nice! – jtlz2 Oct 31 at 19:04
  • @Suraj You shouldn't want to sort the list before hashing because lists which have their contents in different orders are definitely not the same thing. If the order of the items does not matter the problem is that you are using the wrong data structure. You should be using a set instead of a list. – scottclowe Nov 3 at 2:11
  • @scottclowe That is very true. Thanks for adding that point. There are 2 scenarios where you'd still want a list (without specific ordering needs) - 1. List of repeating items. 2. When you've to use a JSON directly. As JSON doesn't support "set" representation. – Suraj Nov 4 at 9:11
5

Updated from 2013 reply...

None of the above answers seem reliable to me. The reason is the use of items(). As far as I know, this comes out in a machine-dependent order.

How about this instead?

import hashlib

def dict_hash(the_dict, *ignore):
    if ignore:  # Sometimes you don't care about some items
        interesting = the_dict.copy()
        for item in ignore:
            if item in interesting:
                interesting.pop(item)
        the_dict = interesting
    result = hashlib.sha1(
        '%s' % sorted(the_dict.items())
    ).hexdigest()
    return result
  • Why do you think it matters that dict.items does not return a predictably ordered list? frozenset takes care of that – glarrain Jul 11 '14 at 22:54
  • 2
    A set, by definition, is unordered. Thus the order in which objects are added is irrelevant. You do have to realize that the built-in function hash does not care about how the frozenset contents are printed or something like that. Test it in several machines and python versions and you'll see. – glarrain Jul 13 '14 at 3:38
  • Why do you use the extra hash() call in value = hash('%s::%s' % (value, type(value)))?? – RuiDo Jul 6 '16 at 10:12
4

To preserve key order, instead of hash(str(dictionary)) or hash(json.dumps(dictionary)) I would prefer quick-and-dirty solution:

from pprint import pformat
h = hash(pformat(dictionary))

It will work even for types like DateTime and more that are not JSON serializable.

  • 3
    Who guarantees that pformat or json always use the same order? – ThiefMaster Jan 30 '15 at 6:02
  • 1
    @ThiefMaster, "Changed in version 2.5: Dictionaries are sorted by key before the display is computed; before 2.5, a dictionary was sorted only if its display required more than one line, although that wasn’t documented."(docs.python.org/2/library/pprint.html) – Arel Jan 15 '16 at 16:21
  • 1
    This doesn't seem valid to me. The pprint modules and pformat are understood by the authors to be for display purposes and not serialization. Because of this, you shouldn't feel safe in assuming that pformat will always return a result that happens to work. – David Sanders Apr 5 '17 at 22:27
3

You could use the third-party frozendict module to freeze your dict and make it hashable.

from frozendict import frozendict
my_dict = frozendict(my_dict)

For handling nested objects, you could go with:

import collections.abc

def make_hashable(x):
    if isinstance(x, collections.abc.Hashable):
        return x
    elif isinstance(x, collections.abc.Sequence):
        return tuple(make_hashable(xi) for xi in x)
    elif isinstance(x, collections.abc.Set):
        return frozenset(make_hashable(xi) for xi in x)
    elif isinstance(x, collections.abc.Mapping):
        return frozendict({k: make_hashable(v) for k, v in x.items()})
    else:
        raise TypeError("Don't know how to make {} objects hashable".format(type(x).__name__))

If you want to support more types, use functools.singledispatch (Python 3.7):

@functools.singledispatch
def make_hashable(x):
    raise TypeError("Don't know how to make {} objects hashable".format(type(x).__name__))

@make_hashable.register
def _(x: collections.abc.Hashable):
    return x

@make_hashable.register
def _(x: collections.abc.Sequence):
    return tuple(make_hashable(xi) for xi in x)

@make_hashable.register
def _(x: collections.abc.Set):
    return frozenset(make_hashable(xi) for xi in x)

@make_hashable.register
def _(x: collections.abc.Mapping):
    return frozendict({k: make_hashable(v) for k, v in x.items()})

# add your own types here
  • This doesn't work, for example, for a dict of DataFrame objects. – James Hirschorn Mar 12 at 17:48
  • @JamesHirschorn: Updated to fail loudly – Eric Mar 13 at 0:40
  • Better! I added the following elif clause to make it work with DataFrames: elif isinstance(x, pd.DataFrame): return make_hashable(hash_pandas_object(x).tolist()) I will edit the answer and see if you accept it... – James Hirschorn Mar 15 at 17:54
  • 1
    OK. I see I was asking for something more than "hashable", which only guarantees that objects that are equal shall have the same hash. I am working on a version that will give the the same value between runs, and independent of python version, etc.. – James Hirschorn Mar 20 at 0:49
  • 1
    hash randomization is deliberate security feature enabled by default in python 3.7. – Eric Mar 20 at 1:51
0

The general approach is fine, but you may want to consider the hashing method.

SHA was designed for cryptographic strength (speed too, but strength is more important). You may want to take this into account. Therefore, using the built-in hash function is probably a good idea, unless security is somehow key here.

  • 6
    built-in hash function is not designed to store the computed value, and hash result may vary with different versions of python. – Taha Jahangir Jan 18 '13 at 7:16
0

You can use the maps library to do this. Specifically, maps.FrozenMap

import maps
fm = maps.FrozenMap(my_dict)
hash(fm)

To install maps, just do:

pip install maps

It handles the nested dict case too:

import maps
fm = maps.FrozenMap.recurse(my_dict)
hash(fm)

Disclaimer: I am the author of the maps library.

  • The library doesn't sort the list inside a dict. And hence this could produce different hash. There should be an option to sort a list too. A frozenset should help, but I wonder how would you handle the case with a nested dict containing a list of dicts. As dict are unhashable. – Suraj Aug 13 at 15:04
  • @Suraj : it does handle nested structure via .recurse. See maps.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api.html#maps.FrozenMap.recurse . Ordering in lists is semantically meaningful, if you want order independence you can convert your lists to sets prior to calling .recurse. You can also make use of the list_fn parameter to .recurse to use a different hashable data structure than tuple (.e.g frozenset) – Pedro Cattori Nov 17 at 14:26
-8

I do it like this:

hash(str(my_dict))
  • 1
    Can someone explain what is so wrong with this method? – mhristache Oct 20 '16 at 12:32
  • 7
    @maximi Dictionaries are not stable it terms of order, thus hash(str({'a': 1, 'b': 2})) != hash(str({'b': 2, 'a': 1})) (while it might work for some dictionaries, it is not guaranteed to work on all). – Vlad Frolov Mar 1 '17 at 9:48

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