29

After providing some answers here, and reading some comments, it would seem that, in practice IOException is never thrown on close for file I/O.

Are there any cases in which calling close on a Stream/Reader/Writer actually throws an IOException?

If an exception is actually thrown, how should it be dealt with?

1
  • I've also noticed that PrintWriter doesn't even have a throws clause.... Aug 3, 2009 at 10:18

5 Answers 5

29

I have found two cases:

  • Losing the network connection when there is still data in the buffer to be flushed.
  • Having the file system fill up (or reaching your user limit for file size) when there is still data in the buffer to be flushed.

Both of those examples depend on something happening while there is still data in the buffer. Close flushes the buffer before the file is closes, so if there is an error writing the data to the file it throws an IOException.

If you execute the following code passing it the name of a file to create on a network drive, and then before you press the enter key unplug your network cable, it will cause the program to throw an IOException in close.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.Writer;

public class Test
{
    public static void main(final String[] argv)
    {
        final File file;

        file = new File(argv[0]);
        process(file);
    }

    private static void process(final File file)
    {
        Writer writer;

        writer = null;

        try
        {
            writer = new FileWriter(file);
            writer.write('a');
        }
        catch(final IOException ex)
        {
            System.err.println("error opening file: " + file.getAbsolutePath());
        }
        finally
        {
            if(writer != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    try
                    {
                        System.out.println("Please press enter");
                        System.in.read();
                    }
                    catch(IOException ex)
                    {
                        System.err.println("error reading from the keyboard");
                    }

                    writer.close();
                }
                catch(final IOException ex)
                {
                    System.err.println("See it can be thrown!");
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Since Java 7 you can use try-with-resources to get out of this mess (removed explicit exception generation code for the close() operation):

private static void process(final File file) {
    try (final Writer writer = new FileWriter(file)) {
        writer.write('a');
    } catch (final IOException e) {
        // handle exception
    }
}

this will auto-magically handle the exceptions in close() and it performs an explicit null check internally.

2
17

When it does happen, it should be handled like any other IOException, not silently ignored like you see recommended so often. The assumption is, I guess, that since you're done using the stream, it doesn't matter if it was cleaned up properly.

However, cleaning up properly is important. If a close() operation does raise an exception, its likely that it involved flushing some output, committing some transaction (in the case of a database connection you thought was read-only), etc.—definitely not something that should be ignored. And, since it is rare, you're not compromising the reliability of your application significantly by aborting the operation.

2
  • 3
    Yes, but what if you only opened the file for reading? Then the problem of flushing or commmitting does not apply.
    – sleske
    Jan 13, 2011 at 10:57
  • 2
    Some form of "commit" may apply, for example the release of locks. I agree that it would be very surprising to see an exception raised when closing any sort of "read-only" resource... this would be such a rare event that I would definitely want to log it. Ignoring it with an empty catch block would not improve the quality of the program.
    – erickson
    Jan 13, 2011 at 21:09
15

For files, you may not see IOException thrown often on close(), but you'll definitely see it for non-File I/O like closing sockets to the network.

Here's an example of a Java bug where closing a UDP socket eventually caused an IOException to be thrown.

1
  • yup, anything that can "go away" can cause that to hapen. A hard drive crash could probably do it too.
    – TofuBeer
    Feb 26, 2009 at 0:25
5

It's specifically FileInputStream.close which does not throw, even if your hard drive is on fire. Presumably it is the same for socket input. For output streams you may also be flushing. Until relatively recently [see timestamps] BufferedOutputStream used to fail to close the underlying stream if flush threw.

(@MaartenBodewes would like me to point out that FileInputStream.close not throwing is not specified by the API docs. At the time of the post it was customary to elide the clause mentioning that this related to the Sun JDK (now known as Oracle JDK and OpenJDK). It appears that an obscure former reimplementation called Apache Harmony which Android used to use may have had different behaviour. Potentially other implementations, or versions of OpenJDK, may also throw.)

8
  • +1 for "even if your hard drive is on fire". I'd like to see that in the Java docs, "throws an IOException if your harddrive is on fire" ;)
    – aioobe
    Jan 13, 2011 at 11:19
  • The published API however makes no such promise: download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/…
    – Raedwald
    Jan 13, 2011 at 12:58
  • @Raedwald Indeed. The question is about "in practice". Jan 13, 2011 at 13:11
  • @TomHawtin-tackline What about this one? Removing the file handle while keeping a stream open seems to be enough... I would not even call that an exceptional exception. Oct 17, 2016 at 9:54
  • 1
    @MaartenBodewes Should have probably mentioned that is not an API guarantee and that implementations (Android 3.0 in that case) may be different. Oct 17, 2016 at 14:08
3

An examination of what can happen when calling close, how exception hiding can affect you and what you can do about it: blog post.

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