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INTRO

I'm working as a junior DevOps Engineer on a small company where we have an app (Microservices architectures) deployed in a development cluster.
We already have a good CI/CD pipeline built where you have steps like building, Unit testing, building the docker image, Functional tests and deployment.
Now, I'm trying to add steps to test migrations and rollbacks of a PSQL dataBase. For that we are using Liquibase.
As you might know, liquibase works with migration and rollback scripts and those need to deal with data integration (data can't be lost or add from one version to another). That will make sure that I can do an update/rollback at any point, even in production.

Test Case

In this case, I'm supposing that I have the following tableA (DB schema version_0.0.0):

+------+--------+
|  id  |  id_2  |
+------+--------+
| 1    | 1      |
+------+--------+
| 1    | 2      |
+------+--------+
| 1    | 3      |
+------+--------+
| 1    | 4      |
+------+--------+

Where the PRIMARY KEY is called "tablea_pkey" and is composed by tableA (id, id_2)

And I need to upgrade the DB schema to the following (version_1.0.0):

+------+--------+--------+
|  id  |  id_2  |  id_3  |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 1      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 2      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 3      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 4      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+

Where the PRIMARY KEY will be called "tablea_pkey" and will be composed by tableA (id, id_2, id_3).

For the migration script I have the following:

ALTER TABLE tableA add column third_id BIGINT NOT NULL DEFAULT  1;
ALTER TABLE tableA DROP CONSTRAINT tablea_pkey;
ALTER TABLE ONLY  tableA ADD CONSTRAINT "tablea_pkey" PRIMARY KEY (id, id_2, id_3);

However, for my rollback script, stuff get a little bit harder because it need to make sure that it deals with data integration!
If the updated version of the table goes to production (with the application code changed too) and this value goes into the new table:

+------+--------+--------+
|  id  |  id_2  |  id_3  |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 1      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 2      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 3      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 4      | 1      |
+------+--------+--------+
| 1    | 4      | 2      |
+------+--------+--------+

How should be my script to get back to the previous version? For sure, an error will be raised if I try to rollback to the primary_key(id, id_2) because I will have repeated values on the table....

QUESTION

Can you guys please tell me how should I write my rollback script without losing any data?

  • Just my opinion: Sometimes rollback is so much hassle that it might be smarter to declare some changes as a "non-rollback-change". So there is no way to rollback from these. Just make sure that this is 100% clear to everyone involved. But of course I don't know your environment and if that is possible for you at all. But it is definitively worth thinking about the option of "non-rollbackable-changes". – Jens Nov 15 at 7:42
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If you are sure, you will need a rollback in future, a better solution will be to take backup of the table either using pg_dump or create a backup table in database.

After this, do the primary key changes, so that in future you can easily revert to the time when you did the changes.

Anyways, if you are doing rollback, any new data will be rolled back as well.

  • "Anyways, if you are doing rollback, any new data will be rolled back as well" - About that.... Not sure it's right....you should be able to do it without losing the data! If not, how do big companies deal with this? Imagine that AMAZON did an update to the DB and 12 hours later they realize that they need to rollback to the previous version... will they lose all the data that was inserted on those 12 hours? they can't.... Now, with most of the migrations/rollbacks you can deal with this data integration in an easy wat...however, you have a few cases that are more difficult, like this! – RuiSMagalhaes Nov 15 at 9:41
  • In case of primary key/unique key conflicts, either you have to rollback the conflicted rows or create a new table and import conflicted data there so that constraints can be reapplied successfully. – Lohit Gupta Nov 15 at 17:12

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