-1

I want to have a node that will be able to point to another node through the function insert. However, I've messed up somehow so that the pointer p does not point to the next Node. I'm unsure of how to use my function in a way such that it will point to the recurred variable a.

This issue is occurring on a AVL tree assignment I've been working on. I've recreated the error in a simpler fashion in the below code.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Node {
    int data;
    Node *next = NULL;
};

Node* insert(Node *a) {
    cout << "inserter" << endl;
    if (a != NULL) {
        a->next = insert(a->next);
    }
    else {
        cout << "inserting" << endl;
        Node *a = new Node;
        a->data = 10;
        a->next = NULL;
    }

    return a;
}

int main() {
    Node *p = new Node;

    p->data = 5;

    insert(p);

    cout << "please" << endl;
    cout << p->data << endl;
    cout << p->next << endl;
    cout << p->next->data << endl;
    cout << "done" << endl;

    return 0;
}

The output is:

inserter
inserter
inserting
please
5
000000

And then it crashes, as p->next is not pointing to anything. I don't know how I can get it to point to the recurrsed pointer a. My main objective is to have a->next be changed without using a returning function, instead a void function that can change a->next using an & in the pass by reference. But I'm unsure how to incorporate the & into a pointer. This hasn't been working (Node *&a).

3

Your main reason for p->next being null is that the pointer you want to return is out of scope when you return it. Outside of else {}, the new pointer you created is no longer valid.

else {
    cout << "inserting" << endl;
    a = new Node;
    a->data = 10;
    a->next = NULL;
}

Because of the Node* before a in your code, you are declaring a new Node pointer, instead of using the one that was passed to the function.

0

In your code, it doesn't seem like you are implementing a tree. It seems more like you are implementing a linked list.

Whatever. In the way you are doing, you can never track the starting node. You have to save it for traversing the tree/linked list.

struct node
{
 int data;
 node *next;
};

node *head, *tail;

void createnode(int value)
{
  node *temp=new node;
  temp->data=value;
  temp->next=NULL;
  if(head==NULL)
  {
    head=temp;
    tail=temp;
    temp=NULL;
  }
  else
  { 
    tail->next=temp;
    tail=temp;
  }
}

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