0

I am receiving the following array from an API response:

[ 
  {group: '1', , value: 'a'}
  {group: '1', , value: 'b'}
  {group: '2', , value: 'c'}
  {group: '2', , value: 'd'}
]  

I want to convert it to the following (want order of groups as received, values can be ordered in any way):

[
  {group: '1', values: ['b', 'a'] },
  {group: '2', values: ['c', 'd'] },
]

Which Javascript function will be the most efficient to convert it?

I am able to do this by:

let result = [];

data.reduce((groupNumber, input) => {
  if (!groupNumber[input.group]) {
     groupNumber[input.group] = {group: input.group, values: []};
     result.push(groupNumber[input.group]);
  }
  groupNumber[input.group].values.push(input);
  return groupNumber;
}, {});

Is reduce the correct function to be used here? Is there a more efficient approach?

Secondly, will reduce preserve the order in the result? If I am actually receiving the data with group 1 entries first, group 2 next, and so on, can I rely on result being ordered similarly?

Note that I only care about the order of the groups, not about the values inside the group.

9
  • @CertainPerformance The title may be a little confusing. The example correctly explains what I want to achieve (basically, convert an array to an array of array) Nov 15 '19 at 7:21
  • Oh wait, I see it now, sorry Nov 15 '19 at 7:23
  • Check this answer from the duplicate if you want to preserve the order
    – adiga
    Nov 15 '19 at 7:26
  • 1
    @adiga His current code actually does preserve the order, because he's pushing to a separate array inside the .reduce callback. Nov 15 '19 at 7:28
  • @CertainPerformance you are right. They are using accumulator as a mapper. Sorry OP
    – adiga
    Nov 15 '19 at 7:29
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Actually either by using reduce() or any other Array methods, the order will be always preserved as they will be executed from index 0 till the end of the array.

But reduce() is mainly used to accumulate the array elements into a single element, it's not the best method for doing such thing but it can be used as well.

Note that your actual code using reduce() isn't returning the right output.

In my opinion I think Array.map() method is better in this case, but it should be used in combination with Array.filter() to remove duplicate elements that will be kept with map():

var result = data.map(v => {
  v.values = data.filter(e => e.group == v.group).map(x => x.value);
  delete v.value;
  return v;
}).filter(x => !x.values.some(e => !e));

Demo:

let data = [{
  group: '1',
  value: 'a'
}, {
  group: '1',
  value: 'b'
}, {
  group: '2',
  value: 'c'
}, {
  group: '2',
  value: 'd'
}];


var result = data.map(v => {
  v.values = data.filter(e => e.group == v.group).map(x => x.value);
  delete v.value;
  return v;
}).filter(x => !x.values.some(e => !e));

console.log(result);

0

I would save my reply because we have a great explanation why your approach is great, because you have O(N) computational complexity (Thanks for the great comments to @CertainPerformance) and you iterate your array just one time.

Testing whether reduce method preserve order of object keys:

It looks like reduce method is not preserving order of keys. Here we see that keys are sorted in order how then iterated through source array myArray, however in Chrome browser this behavior is not reproducible(keys are sorted):

var myArray = [{letter: 'c'}, {letter:'e'}, {letter: 'e'}, {letter:'b'}, {letter: 'c'}, {letter:'a'}, {letter:'b'}, {letter:'a'}, {letter: 'd'}, {letter: 'd'}, {letter: 'd'}, {letter: 'd'}];
var myOrderedKeys = myArray.reduce((a, {letter}) => {
a[letter] = a[letter] || letter;
a[letter] = letter;

return a;
}, {})

console.log(myOrderedKeys);

Another example where we have more than one letter:

let notSimpleLetters = [{letter: 'ce'}, {letter:'ec'}, {letter: 'ec'}, {letter:'bw'}, {letter: 'ce'}, {letter:'aw'}, {letter:'ba'}, {letter:'aa'},
                    {letter: 'df'}, {letter: 'cb'}, {letter: 'dc'}, {letter: 'da'}];
let notSimpleKeys = notSimpleLetters.reduce((a, {letter}) => {
a[letter] = a[letter] || letter;
a[letter] = letter;

return a;
}, {})

console.log(notSimpleKeys);

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  • 3
    It doesn't answer either of the questions (of whether .reduce is appropriate, or whether it preserves the property order), and does not produce the right output for different orderings of data. Nov 15 '19 at 7:28
  • 2
    OP's current code does actually preserve key order. Reducing into an object using numeric keys will not preserve the order of the properties on the object, but OP isn't iterating over the object later, so it's OK. (though, this is confusing, which is why I'd personally avoid reduce here) Nov 15 '19 at 8:18
  • 2
    Object property order can be relied on, if the properties are non-numeric. The specification does not say this yet, but it will soon, and all engines implement it anyway. Nov 15 '19 at 8:18
  • 2
    Well, in OP's code, at least the order of the group objects in the array is proper, but the values property does need to be fixed to be an array of strings rather than an array of objects Nov 15 '19 at 8:26
  • 2
    Yep. OP's code is preserving the desired order, even over numeric keys, but his value properties are malformed. Your code fixes the value properties but doesn't preserve the group order because each group is numeric. Nov 15 '19 at 8:33

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