9

I have to implements a function that takes a string as an input and finds the non-duplicate character from this string.

So an an example is if I pass string str = "DHCD" it will return "DHC" or str2 = "KLKLHHMO" it will return "KLHMO"

2
  • Could you post what you have tried so far?
    – SquareCog
    Feb 26 '09 at 1:47
  • I afraid LINQ maybe slow
    – Red Hot
    Feb 26 '09 at 1:57

21 Answers 21

32

A Linq approach:

public static string RemoveDuplicates(string input)
{
    return new string(input.ToCharArray().Distinct().ToArray());
}
1
  • 4
    I don't think you to need to cast to char array here?
    –  Pat
    Mar 31 '18 at 17:32
7

It will do the job

string removedupes(string s)
{
    string newString = string.Empty;
    List<char> found = new List<char>();
    foreach(char c in s)
    {
       if(found.Contains(c))
          continue;

       newString+=c.ToString();
       found.Add(c);
    }
    return newString;
}

I should note this is criminally inefficient.

I think I was delirious on first revision.

2
  • 1
    am I guessing correctly that you intentionally left the inefficiencies as an exercise to the reader, or do you want suggestions on making this work faster?
    – SquareCog
    Feb 26 '09 at 1:49
  • Indeed you are correct, if it is homework then the OP can filter through and create one that isn't terrible. It also serves as a baseline for understanding what is happening. I don't need suggestions on improvements, thanks though. Feb 26 '09 at 1:56
6

For arbitrary length strings of byte-sized characters (not for wide characters or other encodings), I would use a lookup table, one bit per character (32 bytes for a 256-bit table). Loop through your string, only output characters that don't have their bits turned on, then turn the bit on for that character.

string removedupes(string s)
{
    string t;
    byte[] found = new byte[256];
    foreach(char c in s)
    {
        if(!found[c]) {
            t.Append(c);
            found[c]=1;
        }
    }
    return t;
}

I am not good with C#, so I don't know the right way to use a bitfield instead of a byte array.

If you know that your strings are going to be very short, then other approaches would offer better memory usage and/or speed.

5
  • I think this will be significantly faster than Quintin Robinson's approach, but will use significantly more memory for short strings.
    – Sparr
    Feb 26 '09 at 1:54
  • But significantly less memory for medium or long strings, if a bit array is used.
    – Sparr
    Feb 26 '09 at 3:03
  • Your heart is in the right place, but your logic is a bit off. It should be if(found[c]){t+=c; found[c] = 1;} No else block needed. Your current code won't do the trick.
    – BFree
    Feb 26 '09 at 3:22
  • Cannot implicitly convert type 'byte' to 'bool' on if (found[c])?
    – GONeale
    Mar 2 '13 at 3:31
  • @GONeale I'm not sure the right way to do that conversion in C#, try if(!!found[c])
    – Sparr
    Mar 3 '13 at 5:38
4
    void removeDuplicate()
    {
      string value1 = RemoveDuplicateChars("Devarajan");
    }

     static string RemoveDuplicateChars(string key)
    {
        string result = "";          
        foreach (char value in key)
            if (result.IndexOf(value) == -1)                   
                result += value;
        return result;
    }
1
  • 1
    You don't need the following lines 1) string result = ""; and 2) result += value; Returning table would suffice. May 19 '14 at 21:10
3

It sounds like homework to me, so I'm just going to describe at a high level.

  • Loop over the string, examining each character
  • Check if you've seen the character before
    • if you have, remove it from the string
    • if you haven't, note that you've now seen that character
2

this is in C#. validation left out for brevity. primitive solution for removing duplicate chars from a given string

    public static char[] RemoveDup(string s)
    {
        char[] chars = new char[s.Length];
        int unique = 0;
        chars[unique] = s[0];  // Assume: First char is unique
        for (int i = 1; i < s.Length; i++)
        {
            // add char in i index to unique array 
            // if char in i-1 != i index
            // i.e s = "ab" -> a != b
            if (s[i-1] != s[i]
            chars[++unique] = s[i];
        }
        return chars;
    }
1

My answer in java language.
Posting here so that you might get a idea even it is in Java language.Algorithm would remain same.

public String removeDup(String s)
  {
    if(s==null) return null;
    int l = s.length();
    //if length is less than 2 return string
    if(l<2)return s;
    char arr[] = s.toCharArray();

    for(int i=0;i<l;i++)
    {
      int j =i+1; //index to check with ith index
      int t = i+1; //index of first repetative char.

      while(j<l)
      {
        if(arr[j]==arr[i])
        {
          j++;

        }
        else
        {
          arr[t]=arr[j];
          t++;
          j++;
        }

      }
      l=t;
    }

    return new String(arr,0,l);
  }
1

you may use HashSet:

 static void Main()
    {
        string textWithDuplicates = "aaabbcccggg";

        Console.WriteLine(textWithDuplicates.Count());  
        var letters = new HashSet<char>(textWithDuplicates);
        Console.WriteLine(letters.Count());

        foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c);   
    }
1
 class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool[] doesExists = new bool[256];
            String st = Console.ReadLine();
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (char ch in st)
            {
                if (!doesExists[ch])
                {
                    sb.Append(ch);
                    doesExists[ch] = true;
                }
            }
            Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
        }
    }
1

Revised version of the first answer i.e: You don't need ToCharArray() function for this to work.

public static string RemoveDuplicates(string input)
{
    return new string(input.Distinct().ToArray());
}
0
0

char *remove_duplicates(char *str) { char *str1, *str2;

if(!str)
    return str;

str1 = str2 = str;

while(*str2)            
{   
    if(strchr(str, *str2)<str2)
    {
        str2++;
        continue;
    }

    *str1++ = *str2++;      
}
*str1 = '\0';

return  str;

}

0
char* removeDups(const char* str)
{
 char* new_str = (char*)malloc(256*sizeof(char));
 int i,j,current_pos = 0,len_of_new_str;
 new_str[0]='\0';

 for(i=0;i<strlen(str);i++)
{
 len_of_new_str = strlen(new_str);
for(j=0;j<len_of_new_str && new_str[j]!=str[i];j++)
   ;
  if(j==len_of_new_str)
   {
     new_str[len_of_new_str] = str[i];
     new_str[len_of_new_str+1] = '\0';
   }
}
  return new_str;
}

Hope this helps

0
0
String str="AABBCANCDE";  
String newStr=""; 
for( int i=0; i<str.length(); i++)
{
 if(!newStr.contains(str.charAt(i)+""))
 newStr= newStr+str.charAt(i);
 }
 System.out.println(newStr);
0

// Remove both upper-lower duplicates

public static string RemoveDuplicates(string key)
    {
        string Result = string.Empty;
        foreach (char a in key)
        {
            if (Result.Contains(a.ToString().ToUpper()) || Result.Contains(a.ToString().ToLower()))
                continue;
            Result += a.ToString();
        }
        return Result;
    }
0
var input1 = Console.ReadLine().ToLower().ToCharArray();
var input2 = input1;
var WithoutDuplicate = input1.Union(input2);
2
  • Although this code might solve the problem, a good answer should always contain an explanation.
    – BDL
    Feb 8 '17 at 13:42
  • Agreed. I just posted another way to achieve the result. Ofcourse "Distinct() " from the same library addresses the cause. Feb 10 '17 at 4:00
0
Console.WriteLine("Enter String");

string str = Console.ReadLine();

string result = "";
result += str[0]; // first character of string

for (int i = 1; i < str.Length; i++)
{
    if (str[i - 1] != str[i])
        result += str[i];
}

Console.WriteLine(result);
0

I like Quintin Robinson answer, only there should be some improvements like removing List, because it is not necessarry in this case. Also, in my opinion Uppercase char ("K") and lowercase char ("k") is the same thing, so they should be counted as one.

So here is how I would do it:

private static string RemoveDuplicates(string textEntered)
    {

        string newString = string.Empty;

        foreach (var c in textEntered)
        {
            if (newString.Contains(char.ToLower(c)) || newString.Contains(char.ToUpper(c)))
            {
                continue;
            }
            newString += c.ToString();
        }
        return newString;
    }
1
  • This isn't an improvement. Contains has to scan all characters. String manipulation creates new temporary strings. This results in at n^2 scans and quite a lot of temporary strings. The top-voted answer with LINQ and Distinct is actually faster (only scans once) and consumes less memory Jan 31 '18 at 13:20
0

Not sure how optimal it is:

public static string RemoveDuplicates(string input)
{
    var output = string.Join("", input.ToHashSet());
    return output;
}
0

Below is the code to remove duplicate chars from a string

        var input = "SaaSingeshe";
        var filteredString = new StringBuilder();
        foreach(char c in input)
        {
            if(filteredString.ToString().IndexOf(c)==-1)
            {
                filteredString.Append(c);
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine(filteredString);
        Console.ReadKey();
0

namespace Demo { class Program {

  static void Main(string[] args) {
     string myStr = "kkllmmnnouo";
     Console.WriteLine("Initial String: "+myStr);
    // var unique = new HashSet<char>(myStr);
     HashSet<char> unique = new HashSet<char>(myStr);
     Console.Write("New String after removing duplicates: ");

     foreach (char c in unique) 
        Console.Write(c);   
  }    } }
0

this works for me

private string removeDuplicateChars(String value)
{
    return new string(value.Distinct().ToArray());
}
0

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