1

I have custom type below:

-- (Int,Int,Int) = (Year, Month, Day)
type Birth = (Int, Int, Int)
type Book = String
data Author = Author Book Book Book Birth

I was thinking that (Q1) if there is a way to iterate over the property inside Author, which means a function fun applied to a Author type will return Book values separately. I have thought using

BookA :: Author -> Book
BookA (Author bkA _ _ _) = bkA

or case...ofstatement to get all three books separately, but it is too redundant. Is there a way iterately or recursively?

Also, (Q2) how can I get the BirthDay in a single function insdead of these:

birth :: Author -> Birth
birth (Author _ _ _ birth) = birth

bDay :: Birth -> Int
bDay (_,_,bDay) = bDay

Thank you guys so much.

1
  • 3
    Why not make it a list Author [Book] Birth? Nov 15, 2019 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

3

Q1: You can get all three books at the same time by pattern matching, and then return them as a list:

books :: Author -> [Book]
books (Author a b c _) = [a, b, c]

But are you sure you want to define your Author like that? What if an author has two books or four? Such author wouldn't fit your definition, would it?

As @WillemVanOnsem pointed out in the comments, a more robust definition would be to make Author contain a list of Book instead of three books separately:

data Author = Author [Book] Birth

Q2: You can compose the two functions you have:

authorBDay :: Author -> Int
authorBDay = bDay . birth

Or, alternatively, you can pattern match directly:

authorBDay :: Author -> Int
authorBDay (Author _ _ _ (_,_,d)) = d

Patterns can be nested. That's their primary point.

2
  • But this (the nested pattern matching) does get pretty unwieldy as you add more levels of nesting, which is one of the main reasons Lens exists. Nov 16, 2019 at 0:06
  • Thank you so much for replying. Basically authors have three book exactly saying in the assignment. I was also wondering if there is a way to iterate over a single tuple with 3 elements?
    – G TTT
    Nov 19, 2019 at 12:53
2

I was thinking that (Q1) if there is a way to iterate over the property inside Author (…)

Although you can do that with Data, it here looks a bit overkill. You can here simply match the tree books, and return these in a list:

BookA :: Author -> [Book]
BookA (Author bkA bkB bkC _) = [bkA, bkB, bkC]

Here it makes more sense however to define a list of Books for an Author, since now you basically say that each Author has written exactly three books. By making a list, an Author can have written, zero, one, or more books:

data Author = Author [Book] Birth

You can even use records syntax, and let Haskell write the getters for you:

data Author = Author { booksA :: [Book], birth :: Birth }

Also, (Q2) how can I get the BirthDay in a single function insdead of these (…)

You can use nested patterns, like:

bday :: Author -> Birth
bdayA (Author _ _ _ (_, _, bd)) = bd

But often in Haskell one makes small reusable functions that can be combined. If you thus define birth and bDay, like you did, you can define the birthday of an Author with:

birth :: Author -> Birth
birth (Author _ _ _ birth) = birth

bDay :: Birth -> Int
bDay (_,_,bDay) = bDay

bDayA :: Author -> Int
bDayA = bDay . birth
3
  • Thank you so much for replying. The answer is really clear. I am also wondering if there is a way to do recursion in a single tupe with 3 elements, since I can only find questions about recursion on a list of tuples.
    – G TTT
    Nov 19, 2019 at 12:51
  • @GTTT: yes, by making use of the lens library for example. But it is a bit "overwhelming", with something like toListOf each. Nov 19, 2019 at 12:55
  • That’s fine, I’ll check both documents. Thanks a lot.
    – G TTT
    Nov 19, 2019 at 12:59

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