38

I have a class like this:

struct event_counts {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}

    // more stuff

};

Usually I want to default (zero) initialize the counts array as shown.

At selected locations identified by profiling, however, I'd like to suppress the array initialization, because I know the array is about to be overwritten, but the compiler isn't smart enough to figure it out.

What's an idiomatic and efficient way to create such a "secondary" zero-arg constructor?

Currently, I'm using a tag class uninit_tag which is passed as a dummy argument, like so:

struct uninit_tag{};

struct event_counts {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}

    event_counts(uninit_tag) {}

    // more stuff

};

Then I call the no-init constructor like event_counts c(uninit_tag{}); when I want to suppress construction.

I'm open to solutions that don't involve the creation of a dummy class, or are more efficient in some way, etc.

  • "because I know the array is about to be overwritten" Are you 100% sure your compiler isn't doing that optimization for you already? case in point: gcc.godbolt.org/z/bJnAuJ – Frank Nov 16 at 0:08
  • 5
    @Frank - I feel like the answer to your question is in the second half of the sentence you quoted? It doesn't belong in the question, but a variety of things can happen: (a) often the compiler simply isn't strong enough to eliminate the dead stores (b) sometimes only a subset of the elements are overwritten and this defeats the optimization (but only that same subset is later read) (c) sometimes the compiler could do it, but is defeated e.g., because the method isn't inlined. – BeeOnRope Nov 16 at 0:11
  • Do you have any other constructors in your class? – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Nov 16 at 0:16
  • 1
    @Frank - eh, your case in point shows that gcc does not eliminate the dead stores? In fact, if you had made me guess I'd have thought that gcc would get this very simple case right, but if it fails here then imagine any slightly more complicated case! – BeeOnRope Nov 16 at 0:20
  • 1
    @uneven_mark - yes, gcc 9.2 does it at -O3 (but this optimization is uncommon compared to -O2, IME), but earlier versions didn't. In general, dead store elimination is a thing, but it is very fragile and subject to all the usual caveats, such as the compiler being able to see the dead stores at the same time it sees the dominating stores. My comment was more to clarify what Frank was trying to say because he said "case in point: (godbolt link)" but the link shows both stores being performed (so maybe I'm missing something). – BeeOnRope Nov 16 at 0:44
32

The solution you already have is correct, and is exactly what I'd want to see if I were reviewing your code. It is as efficient as possible, clear and concise.

  • 1
    The main issue I have is whether I should declare a new uninit_tag flavor in every place that I want to use this idiom. I was hoping there was something like such an indicator type already, perhaps in std::. – BeeOnRope Nov 16 at 0:16
  • 9
    There is not an obvious choice from the standard library. I wouldn't define a new tag for every class where I want this feature--I would define a project-wide no_init tag and use it in all my classes where it's needed. – John Zwinck Nov 16 at 0:18
  • 2
    I think the standard library has manly tags for differentiating iterators and such stuff and the two std::piecewise_construct_t and std::in_place_t. None of them seems reasonable to use here. Maybe you would like to define a global object of your type to use always, so you don't need the braces in every constructor call. The STL does this with std::piecewise_construct for std::piecewise_construct_t. – n314159 Nov 16 at 0:27
  • It is not as efficient as possible. In the AArch64 calling convention for instance the tag has to be stack-allocated, with knock-on effects (can't tail-call either...): godbolt.org/z/6mSsmq – TLW Nov 18 at 1:04
  • 1
    @TLW Once you add body to constructors there is no stack allocation, godbolt.org/z/vkCD65 – R2RT says Reinstate Monica Nov 21 at 8:38
7

If the constructor body is empty, it can be omitted or defaulted:

struct event_counts {
    std::uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];
    event_counts() = default;
};

Then default initialization event_counts counts; will leave counts.counts uninitialized (default initialization is a no-op here), and value initialization event_counts counts{}; will value initialize counts.counts, effectively filling it with zeros.

  • 3
    But then again you have to remember to use value initialization and OP wants it to be safe by default. – doc Nov 16 at 19:37
  • @doc, I agree. This is not the exact solution for what OP wants. But this initialization mimics built-in types. For int i; we accept that it is not zero-initialized. Maybe we should also accept that event_counts counts; is not zero-initialized and make event_counts counts{}; our new default. – Evg Nov 16 at 19:44
  • you have some good point here. – doc Nov 18 at 13:31
4

I like your solution. You might have also considered nested struct and static variable. For example:

struct event_counts {
    static constexpr struct uninit_tag {} uninit = uninit_tag();

    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}

    explicit event_counts(uninit_tag) {}

    // more stuff

};

With static variable uninitialized constructor call may seem more convenient:

event_counts e(event_counts::uninit);

You can of course introduce a macro to save typing and make it more of a systematic feature

#define UNINIT_TAG static constexpr struct uninit_tag {} uninit = uninit_tag();

struct event_counts {
    UNINIT_TAG
}

struct other_counts {
    UNINIT_TAG
}
2

I think an enum is a better choice than either a tag class or a bool. You don't need to pass an instance of a struct and it's clear from the caller which option your are getting.

struct event_counts {
    enum Init { INIT, NO_INIT };
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts(Init init = INIT) {
        if (init == INIT) {
            std::fill(counts, counts + MAX_COUNTERS, 0);
        }
    }
};

Then creating instances looks like this:

event_counts e1{};
event_counts e2{event_counts::INIT};
event_counts e3{event_counts::NO_INIT};

Or, to make it more like the tag class approach, use a single-value enum instead of the tag class:

struct event_counts {
    enum NoInit { NO_INIT };
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}
    explicit event_counts(NoInit) {}
};

Then there are only two ways to create an instance:

event_counts e1{};
event_counts e2{event_counts::NO_INIT};
  • I agree with you: enum are simpler. But maybe you forgot this line: event_counts() : counts{} {} – bluish Nov 21 at 8:18
  • @bluish, my intention was not to initialize counts unconditionally, but only when INIT is set. – TimK Nov 21 at 14:57
  • @bluish I think main reason to choose a tag class is not to achieve simplicity, but to signalize that uninitialized object is special, i.e. it uses optimization feature rather than normal part of class interface. Both bool and enum are decent, but we have to be aware that using parameter instead of overload has somewhat different semantical shade. In the former one you clearly parametrize an object, hence initialized/uninitialized stance becomes its state, whereas passing a tag object to ctor is more like asking class to perform a conversion. So it's not IMO a matter of syntactical choice. – doc Nov 22 at 3:14
  • @TimK But the OP wants the default behaviour to be the initialization of the array, so I think that your solution to the question should include event_counts() : counts{} {}. – bluish Nov 22 at 8:35
  • @bluish In my original suggestion counts is initialized by std::fill unless NO_INIT is requested. Adding the default constructor as you suggest would make two different ways of doing default initialization, which isn't a great idea. I've added another approach that avoids using std::fill. – TimK Nov 22 at 17:04
1

You may want to consider a two-phase initialization for your class:

struct event_counts {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() = default;

    void set_zero() {
       std::fill(std::begin(counts), std::end(counts), 0u);
    }
};

The constructor above does not initialize the array to zero. To set the elements of the array to zero, you have to call the member function set_zero() after construction.

  • 7
    Thanks, I considered this approach but want something that keeps the default safe - i.e., zero by default, and only in a few selected places I override the behavior to the unsafe one. – BeeOnRope Nov 16 at 0:15
  • 3
    This will require extra care to be taken at all but the uses that are supposed to be uninitialized. So it is an extra source of bugs relative to OPs solution. – walnut Nov 16 at 0:15
  • @BeeOnRope one could also provide std::function as a constructor argument with something similar to set_zero as default argument. You would then pass a lambda function if you want uninitialized array. – doc Nov 16 at 3:25
1

I would do it like this:

struct event_counts {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}

    event_counts(bool initCounts) {
        if (initCounts) {
            std::fill(counts, counts + MAX_COUNTERS, 0);
        }
    }
};

The compiler will be smart enough to skip all the code when you use event_counts(false), and you get to say exactly what you mean instead of making your class' interface so weird.

  • 8
    You're right about efficiency, but boolean parameters don't make for readable client code. When you're reading along, and you see the declaration event_counts(false), what does that mean? You have no idea without going back and looking at the name of the parameter. Better to at least use an enum, or, in this case, a sentinel/tag class as shown in the question. Then, you get a declaration more like, event_counts(no_init), which is obvious to everyone in its meaning. – Cody Gray Nov 16 at 14:15
  • I think this is also decent solution. You could discard default ctor and use default value event_counts(bool initCountr = true). – doc Nov 16 at 19:39
  • Also, ctor should be explicit. – doc Nov 16 at 19:44
  • unfortunately currently C++ doesn't support named parameters, but we can use boost::parameter and call event_counts(initCounts = false) for readability – phuclv Nov 17 at 7:49
  • 1
    Funnily enough, @doc, event_counts(bool initCounts = true) actually is a default constructor, due to every parameter having a default value. The requirement is just that it be callable without specifying arguments, event_counts ec; doesn't care if it's parameter-less or uses default values. – Justin Time 2 Reinstate Monica Nov 17 at 19:23
1

I'd use a subclass just to save a bit of typing:

struct event_counts {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];

    event_counts() : counts{} {}
    event_counts(uninit_tag) {}
};    

struct event_counts_no_init: event_counts {
    event_counts_no_init(): event_counts(uninit_tag{}) {}
};

You can get rid of the dummy class by the changing the argument of the not initializing constructor to bool or int or something, as it doesn't have to be mnemonic anymore.

You could also swap the inheritance around and define events_count_no_init with a defaulted constructor like Evg suggested in their answer, and then have events_count be the subclass:

struct event_counts_no_init {
    uint64_t counts[MAX_COUNTERS];
    event_counts_no_init() = default;
};

struct event_counts: event_counts_no_init {
    event_counts(): event_counts_no_init{} {}
};
  • This is an interesting idea, but I also feel like introducing a new type will cause friction. E.g., when I actually want a uninitialized event_counts, I'll want it to be of type event_count, not event_count_uninitialized, so I should slice right at construction like event_counts c = event_counts_no_init{};, which I think eliminates most of the savings in typing. – BeeOnRope Nov 17 at 20:41
  • @BeeOnRope Well, for most purposes an event_count_uninitialized object is an event_count object. That's the whole point of inheritance, they're not completely different types. – Ross Ridge Nov 17 at 22:14
  • Agreed, but the rub is with "for most purposes". They are not interchangeable - e.g., if you try to see assign ecu to ec it works, but not the other way around. Or if you use template functions, they are different types and end with with different instantiations even if the behavior ends up being identical (and sometimes it won't be e.g., with static template members). Especially with heavy use of auto this can definitely crop up and be confusing: I wouldn't want the way an object was initialized to be permanently reflected in its type. – BeeOnRope Nov 17 at 22:29

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