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Problem: I have an array terrain of shape (N+2,N+2,4). In the last dimension, we have either 1's or -1's, -1 if the arrow in that direction is pointing TO the point in question and 1 if the arrow points FROM the point in that direction. The order is north, south, east, west. So, 1,-1,1,1 would correspond to:

enter image description here

The code I'm trying to work with is the following. But that doesn't work since they are all plotted FROM the point. I couldn't find a way to easily plot from or to the point in the desired direction based on the value of the position in terrain[i,j] that corresponds to the direction in question.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
N=3
terrain = np.zeros((N+2,N+2,4))

for i in range(1, N+1):
    for j in range(1, N+1):
        terrain[i,j] = np.random.choice([-1,1],4)

for i in range(N+2):
    for j in range(N+2):
        iterr.append([i,j])

iterr = np.array(iterr)

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
plt.quiver(iterr[:,0], iterr[:,1], terrain[:,:,0].reshape(((N+2)**2,1)), np.zeros(((N+2)**2,1)), color='k')
plt.quiver(iterr[:,0], iterr[:,1], terrain[:,:,1].reshape(((N+2)**2,1)), np.zeros(((N+2)**2,1)), color='yellow')
plt.quiver(iterr[:,0], iterr[:,1], np.zeros(((N+2)**2,1)), terrain[:,:,2].reshape(((N+2)**2,1)), color='blue')
plt.quiver(iterr[:,0], iterr[:,1], np.zeros(((N+2)**2,1)), terrain[:,:,3].reshape(((N+2)**2,1)), color='red')
  • Can you change your code to a minimal, reproducible example ? – Jan Kuiken Nov 16 '19 at 12:14
  • I believe now it should be clearer what terrain is like, which I guess was the problem. Hopefully it's clear that the problem is with the plotting aspect of it. – Fhoenix Nov 16 '19 at 16:14
  • The code is still not a minimal, reproducible example. There are several issues before the plt.quiver calls. What libraries are imported? The return terrain doesn't make sense in this context. The iterr = line has problems. itertools probably is a the library, which method of this library do you want to use? What is the value of N? The chance of getting an answer from the stackoverflow community about the plotting aspect will be better if all of the code before plt.quiver works as expected. – Jan Kuiken Nov 16 '19 at 16:58
  • I'm sorry, I thought I already understood the minimal reproducible example thing, but I was missing the second part of it. – Fhoenix Nov 16 '19 at 22:26
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Probably plt.quiver(X, Y, U, V, C, **kw) is not the easiest method to use in your case. The quiver method will always plot an arrow vector (u,v) from (x,y).

It is probably easier to iterate over the data and use plt.arrow(x, y, dx, dy, **kwargs) to draw the arrows.

Using your data structures and plt.arrow I wrote this, where I skipped all the 0 values in terrain:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
N=3
terrain = np.zeros((N+2,N+2,4))

for i in range(1, N+1):
    for j in range(1, N+1):
        terrain[i,j] = np.random.choice([-1,1],4)

iterr = []
for i in range(N+2):
    for j in range(N+2):
        iterr.append([i,j])

iterr = np.array(iterr)

#-------------------------------------------------

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, aspect='equal')

X = iterr[:,0]
Y = iterr[:,1]
cardinal_vectors = [(0,1), (0,-1), (1,0), (-1,0)]   # north, south, east, west
cardinal_colors  = ['black', 'green', 'blue', 'red'] 

# plot all points        
plt.plot(X,Y,'k.')

for x, y, arrow_directions in zip(X, Y, terrain.reshape(((N+2)**2,4))):

    for direction, vector, color in zip(arrow_directions, 
                                        cardinal_vectors, 
                                        cardinal_colors):

        arrow_size = 0.5
        head_size  = 0.2
        arrow_args = {'length_includes_head' : True,
                      'head_width'           : head_size, 
                      'head_length'          : head_size, 
                      'width'                : 0.02,
                      'fc'                   : color, 
                      'ec'                   : color}

        dx = vector[0] * arrow_size
        dy = vector[1] * arrow_size 

        if direction == 1:
            # arrow FROM (x,y)
            plt.arrow(x, y, dx, dy, **arrow_args)
        if direction == -1:
            # arrow TO (x,y)
            plt.arrow(x + dx, y + dy, -dx, -dy, **arrow_args)

plt.show()

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