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Example of two text files. The left image is before, the right one is after

I need to swap the dates in one file and put it on a new file using comprehension lists. How would I do that? This is what I have:

list1 = [x.replace("\n","").replace("/"," ").split(" ") for x in open("dobA.txt")]
list2 = [(i[len(i)-2],i[len(i)-3]) for i in list1]
with open("dobB.txt", "w") as newfile:
        newfile.write()

The top line of code makes the dates into their own string, such as "10".

The second line of code swaps the numbers I need but only prints out: [('11', '10'), ('8', '9'), ('9', '7')]

The last two are just writing a new file.

How would I swap these two numbers and put them on a new file? Thank you.

0

First of all, do this:

i[-2]

instead of

i[len(i)-2]

There are a couple of options to approach this:

Readable one without comprehensions:

with open("old_file.txt") as old_file, open("new_file.txt", "w") as new_file:
    for line in old_file:
        name, surname, date = line.split()
        day, month, year = date.split("/")
        print(f"{name} {surname} {month}/{day}/{year}", file=new_file)

Regex replace:

import re
from pathlib import Path

text = Path("old_file.txt").read_text()
replaced = re.sub(r"(\d+)/(\d+)/(\d+)", r"\2/\1/\3", text)
Path("new_file.txt").write_text(replaced)

If you really need comprehensions:

with open("old_file.txt") as old_file, open("new_file.txt", "w") as new_file:
    new_lines = [
        f"{text} {date.split('/')[1]}/{date.split('/')[0]}/{date.split('/')[2]}"
        for text, date in [line.rsplit(maxsplit=1) for line in old_file]
    ]
    print("\n".join(new_lines), file=new_file)
1

I wanted to see if this could be done in one shot. It may defy "readability".

The simplest way to flip the month and day is to take advantage of the string formatting methods on datetime objects.

See Python strftime reference for formatting options.

from pathlib import Path
import tempfile
from datetime import datetime
import operator as op

# Create temporary files for reading and writing.
_, filename = tempfile.mkstemp()
file_A = Path(filename)
_, filename = tempfile.mkstemp()
file_B = Path(filename)

contents_A = """Adam Brown 10/11/1999
Lauren Marie Smith 9/8/2001
Vincent Guth II 7/9/1980"""
file_A.write_text(contents_A)

# This version requires Python 3.8. 
# It uses the newly introduced assignment expression ":=".
# datetime objects have string formatting methods.
file_B.write_text(
    "\n".join(# re-join the lines
        [
            " ".join(# re-join the words
                (
                    # Store the split line into words. Then slice all but last.
                    " ".join((words := line.split())[:-1]),
                    # Convert the last word to desired date format.
                    datetime.strptime(words[-1], "%m/%d/%Y",).strftime("%-d/%-m/%Y",),
                )
            )
            for line in fileA.read_text().splitlines()
        ]
    )
)
print(file_B.read_text())

OUTPUT:

Adam Brown 11/10/1999

Lauren Marie Smith 8/9/2001

Vincent Guth II 9/7/1980

Without the ":=" operator it was a little more problematic. It means having to call line.split() twice in the comprehension.

file_B.write_text("\n".join([
    " ".join(
        op.add(
            line.split()[:-1],
            [
                datetime.strptime(
                    line.split()[-1], "%m/%d/%Y",
                ).strftime("%-d/%-m/%Y",),
            ],
        )
    )
    for line in fileA.read_text().splitlines()
]))

print(file_B.read_text())

OUTPUT:

Adam Brown 11/10/1999

Lauren Marie Smith 8/9/2001

Vincent Guth II 9/7/1980

  • sorry homie this is too complicaed, it should be done in like 5 lines of code – I am bad at python Nov 16 at 18:17
  • However you choose to write the comprehension, the point is to use datetime string formatting methods. – dmmfll Nov 16 at 18:31
  • I fixed the formatting. Why an arbitrary 5 lines of code? I did it in 1 expression. – dmmfll Nov 16 at 18:40
  • 1 line is good too – I am bad at python Nov 16 at 18:42

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