24

In the module System.Info I see these functions:

os :: String
arch :: String
compilerName :: String
compilerVersion :: Version

Why is there no IO there? They are accessing the system... Am I wrong? My expectation was something like:

os :: IO String
arch :: IO String
compilerName :: IO String
compilerVersion :: IO Version

Use case:

      print os            -- "darwin"
      print arch          -- "x86_64"
      print compilerName  -- "ghc"
27

You aren't getting that information at runtime. They are hardcoded in the compiler as installed on your system.

This is most obvious if you look at the definition for compilerName as found in http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.12.0.0/docs/src/System.Info.html.

compilerName :: String
compilerName = "ghc"

but even something like os

os :: String
os = HOST_OS

is defined in terms of an otherwise undefined name HOST_OS (a value starting with an uppercase letter??) which suggests that is just a placeholder which gets replaced during installation.

Someone can also correct me (please!), but the {-# LANGUAGE CPP #-} pragma at the top of that file suggests that HOST_OS and the like are replaced by appropriate strings by the C preprocessor before compilation.

19

The question is a good one. The answer, such as it is, is that those values are static per program compilation. They are essentially compiled into the program, and never change after that. As such, nothing (in the assumptions GHC uses) breaks if you treat them as constants. And it's more convenient to use a simple constant than an IO action.

But that's all sort of legacy reasoning. Haskell is an old language. (No really, it's older than Java by several years.) A lot of libraries have been built with reasoning that is no longer considered best practices. These are examples of that. A modern library exposing them would probably make them IO actions even though the results don't change after compilation. It's more useful to put things that aren't constants at the source level behind IO actions, though there are still some notable exceptions, like Int changing size between 32- and 64-bit platforms.

In any case... I'd say your expectations are solid, and those types are the results of historical oddities.

-9

EDIT: Thanks to @interjay and @Antal Spector-Zabusky for explaining why this answer is being downvoted. They wrote

The documentation is a bit misleading. The values are hardcoded into the GHC compiler. After 48 years you surely know that the actual code always trumps documentation. – interjay yesterday @andy256 You're absolutely right that the documentation is bad (indeed, that's part of why Francisco asked this question in the first place), and your confusion is understandable. The thing about Haskell is that if those String values could vary at runtime, that would be an egregious bug – variables aren't allowed to change. This is the significance of the IO type constructor – it represents a computation that is allowed to access the "outside world", and so one whose result can change. Making a system call is a good example of an IO action. … [1/2] – Antal Spector-Zabusky 9 hours ago @andy256 … (Another IO action could be "updating a global counter".) So when we see a String, we know that it can't be doing any communication with the OS under the hood. This is why, perhaps surprisingly if you're not used to Haskell, it wouldn't be easy to implement os :: String to do a system call – any such value is unimplementable in basic Haskell, would violate every programmer's expectation of how programs work, and potentially even trip up the compiler and optimizer (not a theoretical concern – there are Stack Overflow answers where people run into analogous problems). [2/2] – Antal Spector-Zabusky

It currently has two delete votes. I will let that process take it's course, but suggest it actually has some value. On a side note, their explanations show that the question was weak, and so are the answers, since a Haskell newbie could easily follow the reasoning that I did.

Original answer:

I am not a Haskell programmer, but the two answers already given do not match the documentation that the OP linked.

My interpretation of the documentation follows.

os :: String - This gives you "The operating system on which the program is running."

I expect that this will issue a system call to obtain the information. Because the system the program is compiled on may be different to the one it runs on it cannot be a value inserted by the compiler. If the code is being interpreted then the interpreter can provide the result, which must be obtained via a system call.

arch :: String - This gives you "The machine architecture on which the program is running."

Again, I expect that this will issue a system call to obtain the information. Because the system the program is compiled on may be different to the one it runs on it cannot be a value inserted by the compiler.

compilerName :: String - This gives you "The Haskell implementation with which the program was compiled or is being interpreted."

This value is certainly inserted by the compiler / interpreter.

compilerVersion :: String - This gives you "The version of compilerName with which the program was compiled or is being interpreted."

This value is certainly inserted by the compiler / interpreter.

While you may consider the first two call to be obtaining input, the result comes from values held by the Operating System. I/O generally refers to secondary storage access.

  • 3
    It is not true for haskell. Here any computations are unordered and their result can be cached. Functions are pure, so if a function accepts no args, than it is much like a constant. Functions of one arg look like just hashmaps or dictionaries, which compute the value based on the key. You cannot use external environment, do syscalls in such functions, you cannot even get a random number or current date. But if you actually want to use that "sequencing", or environment, then you need to use IO monad to emulate the state, emulate the sequence of operations – Yuri Kovalenko Nov 19 at 8:32
  • "You cannot use external environment, do syscalls in such functions" – Sure you can, especially if "you" are the Haskell compiler! It would be very easy for a Haskell implementation to implement os :: String so that it does a system call when it's evaluated. – Tanner Swett Nov 19 at 11:34
  • 2
    I don't think you understand the significance of the IO monad in Haskell. – Sneftel Nov 19 at 15:43
  • @Sneftel You are, of course, correct. I chose to answer because after 48 years of programming in every paradigm, and writing the odd compiler, the initial answers didn't match the documentation, and they still don't. It clearly says that os and arch are obtained at runtime. – andy256 Nov 20 at 9:47
  • 1
    The documentation is a bit misleading. The values are hardcoded into the GHC compiler. After 48 years you surely know that the actual code always trumps documentation. – interjay Nov 21 at 16:59

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