15

The issue seems to be that certain letters like g, y, q, etc. that have a tail that slopes downwards, do not allow for vertical centering. Here's an image to showcase the problem a.

The characters in the green box are basically perfect, as they have no downward tail. Those in the red box demonstrate the problem.

I would like for all characters to be perfectly vertically centered. In the image, characters with a downward tail are not vertically centered. Is this possible to rectify?

Here is the fiddle that demonstrates the problem in full.

.avatar {
    border-radius: 50%;
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;
    width: 125px;
    height: 125px;
    font-size: 60px;
    background-color: rgb(81, 75, 93);
    font-family: "Segoe UI";
    margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.character {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    line-height: 100%;
    color: #fff;
}
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">W</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">y</div>
</div>

13
  • 1
    This is an interesting question. The answer might be in here: iamvdo.me/en/blog/…
    – dwjohnston
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:08
  • 2
    in this case you need to define what is the center. For me the y is actually centred and the A maybe not. let's not talk when we have different font-family, alignment will get even worse Nov 18, 2019 at 23:12
  • 1
    That's just how letters work. They are aligned, because the v in the y and o part in the g are on the same line as the lowest point for the capital letters. With your logic, Å, Ä, Ö would be aligned just as A and O but they can't be. If you want to do something special about it, you need to use javascript to check if it's a small-cap and then nudge the character up a few characters. Nov 18, 2019 at 23:12
  • 1
    I'm curious if there is a useful answer here. The problem would seem to be that that these genuinely are centered. ie. say you could move the y and the g up, what about if you had a lowercase a? how should that display?
    – dwjohnston
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:14
  • 2
    Open your font in any font editor. Edit every character until you're happy with what you see as "centered". Save and use as your brand new font-family. Should take not more than 15 min. I see no other sane way besides SVG or other trickeries using canvas & co. But I'll think about this question. Nov 18, 2019 at 23:19

4 Answers 4

6

Here is my solution using JS. The idea is to transform the element into an image in order to get its data as pixel then loop through them to find the top and bottom of each character and apply a translation to fix the alignment. This will work with dynamic font properties.

The code is not optimized but it highlight the main idea:

var elems = document.querySelectorAll(".avatar");

var fixes = [];


for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
  var current = elems[i];
  domtoimage.toPixelData(current)
    .then(function(im) {
      /* Search for the top limit */
      var t = 0;
      for (var y = 0; y < current.scrollHeight; ++y) {
        for (var x = 0; x < current.scrollWidth; ++x) {
          var j = (4 * y * current.scrollHeight) + (4 * x);
          if (im[j] == 255 && im[j + 1] == 255 && im[j + 2] == 255) {
            t = y;
            break;
          }
        }
      }
      /* Search the bottom limit*/
      var b = 0;
      for (var y = (current.scrollHeight - 1); y >= 0; --y) {
        for (var x = (current.scrollWidth - 1); x >= 0; --x) {
          var j = (4 * y * current.scrollHeight) + (4 * x);
          if (im[j] == 255 && im[j + 1] == 255 && im[j + 2] == 255) {
            b = current.scrollHeight - y;
            break;
          }
        }
      }
      /* get the difference and apply a translation*/
      var diff = (b - t)/2;
      fixes.push(diff);
      /* we apply the translation when all are calculated*/
      if(fixes.length == elems.length) {
        for (var k = 0; k < elems.length; k++) {
          elems[k].querySelector('.character').style.transform = "translateY(" + fixes[k] + "px)";
        }
      }
    });
}
.avatar {
  border-radius: 50%;
  display: inline-flex;
  vertical-align:top;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  width: 125px;
  height: 125px;
  font-size: 60px;
  background: 
    linear-gradient(red,red) center/100% 1px no-repeat,
    rgb(81, 75, 93);
  font-family: "Segoe UI";
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.character {
  color: #fff;
}
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://css-challenges.com/wp-content/themes/ronneby_child/js/dom-to-image.js"></script>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">W</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">y</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-size:35px">a</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-size:25px">2</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">o</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">|</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">@</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">Â</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-family:arial">Q</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">~</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">8</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">ä</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">ç</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">$</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">></div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">%</div>
</div>

UPDATE

Here is a first optimization of the code:

var elems = document.querySelectorAll(".avatar");
var k = 0;

for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
  domtoimage.toPixelData(elems[i])
    .then(function(im) {
     var l = im.length;
      /* Search for the top limit */
      var t = 0;
      for (var j = 0; j < l; j+=4) {
          if (im[j+1] == 255) { /* Since we know the colors, we can only test the G composant */
            t = Math.ceil((j/4)/125);
            break;
          }
      }
      /* Search the bottom limit*/
      var b = 0;
      for (var j = l - 1; j >= 0; j-=4) {
          if (im[j+1] == 255) {
            b = 125 - Math.ceil((j/4)/125);
            break;
          }
      }
      /* get the difference and apply a translation*/
      elems[k].querySelector('.character').style.transform = "translateY(" + (b - t)/2 + "px)";
      k++;
    });
}
.avatar {
  border-radius: 50%;
  display: inline-flex;
  vertical-align:top;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  width: 125px;
  height: 125px;
  font-size: 60px;
  background: 
    linear-gradient(red,red) center/100% 1px no-repeat,
    rgb(81, 75, 93);
  font-family: "Segoe UI";
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.character {
  color: #fff;
}
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://css-challenges.com/wp-content/themes/ronneby_child/js/dom-to-image.js"></script>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">W</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">y</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-size:35px">a</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-size:25px">2</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">o</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">|</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">@</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">Â</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character" style="font-family:arial">Q</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">~</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">8</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">ä</div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">ç</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">$</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">></div>
</div>
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character">%</div>
</div>

I am using dom-to-image plugin for this.

5
  • A mite slow-running, but this is the first consistently-working solution so far. (With the caveat that the technically-centered  looks weird.)
    – Brilliand
    Nov 19, 2019 at 0:44
  • 1
    @Brilliand I explicitely used  to show that his centring isn't optimal as I commented in his answer ;) He will probably change his mind after seeing this and accept the way font works Nov 19, 2019 at 0:46
  • This looks pretty good. I think I'll use this, if I can make it more efficient. Currently it seems a bit slow.
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 19, 2019 at 2:05
  • @ChronBag yes you can work on the code and optimise it, there is room for this. I didn't do it as it my take a lot of time and it's not really the purpose of the question. I wanted to focus on the main idea. Will probably do later by the way. Nov 19, 2019 at 7:52
  • @ChronBag added an optimization, a little faster I guess. Nov 19, 2019 at 15:57
1

Maybe there is a better answer, but it sounds like the only way to is to manually apply different styles depending on whether it is one of:

  • Capital letter
  • Lowercase with a tail
  • Lowercase with a stalk
  • Lowercase with neither

Now note that, in my understanding, the relative heights of tails and stalks I think is defined by the font. I'm not sure if there's a way to access that programatically - so you might need to adjust these values with the font.

Note also that this solution wouldn't work for supporting multiple languages - as you would need to define which category every single character fits in across dozens of different character sets.

const letters = ['a', 'b', 'y', 'X', 'c', 'y', 'A', 'B', 'Y']; 

function getAdditionalClass(char){
    //To do - fill arrays with the rest of the appropriate letters
    if (['y', 'g'].includes(char)) {
        return "tail"; 
    }
    if (['b', 'd'].includes(char)) {
        return "stalk"; 
    }
    
    if (['a', 'c'].includes(char)) {
        return "small"; 
    }
    
    return "capital"; 
}

letters.forEach(v => {
  const avatar = document.createElement("div"); 
  avatar.className = "avatar"; 
  const character = document.createElement("div");
  character.textContent = v; 
  character.className = `character ${getAdditionalClass(v)}`; 
  
  avatar.appendChild(character); 
  
  const root = document.getElementById("root"); 
  
  root.appendChild(avatar); 
  
});
.avatar {
    border-radius: 50%;
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
    width: 125px;
    height: 125px;
    font-size: 60px;
    background-color: rgb(81, 75, 93);
    font-family: "Segoe UI";
    margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.character {
    position: relative;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    line-height: 100%;
    color: #fff;
}


.small {
    top: 45%; 
}

.stalk {
    top: 50%;
}

.tail {
    top: 41%;
}

.capital {
    top: 50%;
}

#root {
    display: flex; 
    flex-flow: row wrap; 
}
<div id = "root">

</div>

4
  • I was hoping to avoid something like this, but it may be the only solution. If nothing else comes along, I'll probably use this. Thanks
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:36
  • 2
    If the letter can be any unicode letter (from any alphabet), then this becomes unworkable.
    – Brilliand
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:37
  • You forget the ÂË and âë Nov 18, 2019 at 23:37
  • Ah yeah, good point @Brilliand My users will be able to use any unicode text for their display names, so this solution is even more brittle.
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:38
0

This is a tricky situation!

From what I can tell, this will be most difficult to make natively scalable (i.e. %, vw or vh values instead of px or em). If you need to make this look pretty on mobile or tablet, please consider using my solution with @media breakpoints.

My solution essentially detects if it is a lowercase element with a tail and adds a class to offset the height to compensate for the tail.

In my testing, it didn't appear that any additional handlers were required for capital letters or lower case letters without a tail. Be feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

There's a JSFiddle if you want to mess around and change / test this solution.

var circles = document.getElementsByClassName('circle');
var tails = ['q', 'y', 'p', 'g', 'j'] ;

Array.from(circles).forEach(render);
  
function render(element) { 		
    if(element.innerText == element.innerText.toLowerCase() &&
    	tails.includes(element.innerText)) {
    	element.className += " scale";
    }
}
.circle {
  height: 150px;
  width: 150px;
  background-color: #bbb;
  border-radius: 50%;
  display: inline-block;
  text-align: center;
  vertical-align: middle;
  line-height: 150px;
  font-size: 50px;
}

.scale {
  line-height: 135px;
}
<div>
  <div class="circle">W</div>
  <div class="circle">X</div>
</div>
<div>
  <div class="circle">y</div>
  <div class="circle">t</div>
</div>

Let me know your thoughts and if I've missed anything. It'd be cool to get a final solution for this as I've had similar issues in the past myself!

4
  • This seems to be similar to dwjohnston's solution, and subject to the same pitfalls as his. Nevertheless, it is appreciated, and I might end up going with something along these lines if nothing more ideal comes along.
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:48
  • I suppose as a last resort, you could go down the path of pixel counting - as seen here whereby you would detect it's actual height in pixels and then apply the appropriate offset.
    – EGC
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:54
  • 1
    Yeah I mentioned that idea in the comments to the OP. Maybe that's the way to go.
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:57
  • Sorry about noting your idea again.. too many comments, obviously missed it!
    – EGC
    Nov 19, 2019 at 0:05
-1

You would probably need a helperclass for this, so that you can translate the lowercase letters more than the capital letters. A simple script can easily put these helper classes on automatically.

Hope this solves the problem for you :)

.avatar {
    border-radius: 50%;
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
    width: 125px;
    height: 125px;
    font-size: 60px;
    background-color: rgb(81, 75, 93);
    font-family: "Segoe UI";
    margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.character {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    line-height: 100%;
    color: #fff;
}
.character-lowercase {
  transform: translateY(-60%);
}
.character-capital {
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character character-capital">W</div>
</div>

<div class="avatar">
  <div class="character character-lowercase">y</div>
</div>

6
  • your y is not centered. Tweek some more! Nov 18, 2019 at 23:28
  • I also don't know ahead of time what the letters will be.
    – Chron Bag
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:28
  • I understand that, but a script that checks if the letter is upper- or lowercase and puts a helperclass on the HTML based on that will fix that easily :)
    – someone
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:36
  • @RagnaRoaldset I think he doesn't mean upper or lower case. He meant there is lowercase yet different shape of character. Compare o and y and you'll get that. The characters with tails creates the problem in first place (mentioned in post).
    – Anna
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:39
  • 1
    You could always create an array for all letters with tails, and loop through it to check if the letter in the div matches before applying the class :) But I get it, just tried to come with an solution :) hope someone comes up with it :)
    – someone
    Nov 18, 2019 at 23:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.