4

This is my code:

reverseEncode :: Char -> String -> Int -> Char
reverseEncode _ [] _ = ?
reverseEncode c (x:xs) offset
 | alphaPos c == (alphaPos x + offset) `mod` 26 = chr (((alphaPos x + offset) + 65) `mod` 26)
 | otherwise = reverseEncode c xs offset

It's just a small method used in a virtual Enigma Machine. After writing the function without the second line and testing it, I got this exception:

Non-exhaustive patterns in function reverseEncode

I then realised I didn't tell the function when to stop recursing. This is how that second line of code was born. Obviously, I could just check the length of the string at each step, but it doesn't look as elegant.

Is there anything in Haskell I can put instead of '?' ? If not, is there anything I can define? Or is this something that could be done in a better way?

EDIT: I've actually tried the version with checking the length of the string, and I get the same exception. So how do I make it work?

  • 1
    No there is no empty character. Are you sure you do not want to return a String? – Willem Van Onsem Nov 18 '19 at 23:39
  • I am sure. I have to return the encoded character. – Emi Buliga Nov 18 '19 at 23:44
  • Consider building a lookup table; then reverseEncode is just an application of lookup to that table. – chepner Nov 19 '19 at 14:14
9

There is no empty character. You could however use a character like the Nul character [wiki]. For example with:

reverseEncode :: Char -> String -> Int -> Char
reverseEncode _ [] _ = '\00'
reverseEncode c (x:xs) offset
    | alphaPos c == sm `mod` 26 = chr ((sm + 65) `mod` 26)
    | otherwise = reverseEncode c xs offset
    where sm = alphaPos x + offset

But a more Haskellish approach would be to change the return type. For example by using a Maybe Char instead. This is often used for "computations that can fail". So we could do this with:

reverseEncode :: Char -> String -> Int -> Maybe Char
reverseEncode _ [] _ = Nothing
reverseEncode c (x:xs) offset
    | alphaPos c == sm `mod` 26 = Just (chr ((sm + 65) `mod` 26))
    | otherwise = reverseEncode c xs offset
    where sm = alphaPos x + offset

Here the Nothing thus means we reached the end of the list without meeting the condition, and Just x means that the computation resulted in an answer x.

  • Okay, so... The result of this function is used as input to another function. When running the code with your suggested version for reverseEncode, I get an error from the function calling this function, namely " Couldn't match expected type ‘Char’ with actual type ‘Maybe Char’ ". So basically I have to change the types in every function that calls this function? – Emi Buliga Nov 18 '19 at 23:49
  • 3
    @EmiBuliga: if you use this approach, yes. The Maybe type is an instance of Monad, so you can use >>= to make "chaining" operations more convenient, etc. But that might be a bit "too advanced" for now. – Willem Van Onsem Nov 18 '19 at 23:50
  • Of course there's also (error "This was proven to never happen") :: Char :-) – Bergi Nov 18 '19 at 23:56
  • 2
    @Bergi since the OP said they were getting a "non-exhaustive patterns" error before putting that line in, I would say it's in fact been proved to happen. – Robin Zigmond Nov 19 '19 at 0:01
  • @RobinZigmond Oh, right, he said "exception". I thought it was linter/compiler warning… – Bergi Nov 19 '19 at 0:02

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