2
#include <stdio.h>

int strcompare (char*);
int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int argIndex;
for(argIndex = 1; argIndex <= argc; argIndex++)
{
    strcompare(argv[argIndex]);
    printf("%s has %d letters in it\n", argv[argIndex], strcompare(argv[argIndex]));
}
return 0;
}

int strcompare (char *str)
{
    int index, letterDex = 0;
    for (index = 0; *str != '0'; index++)
    {
        letterDex++;
    }
}

The assignment is to count the number of letters in a word, when I compile I don't get any errors, but when I try to run it it just doesn't work at all

./cma_length noah bruh conner

and nothing comes after it when I hit enter.

3
  • 1
    You should be getting at least one warning from your compiler. If youa re not turn all the warnings on. Nov 18 '19 at 23:44
  • What does strcompare return ? More to the point, does strcompare return anything ? And yet does it claim it will ? Also, check that for condition. Do you understand that will run until a hard digit character '0' is encountered, unbounded by anything else, and as you've provided no such strings containing a '0' digit character in your input, your code will run pass their end-of-string terminators and off of the cliff of undefined behavior. Are you sure you didn't mean for that to stop on a terminator rather than a digit-'0' ?
    – WhozCraig
    Nov 18 '19 at 23:58
  • 2
    Your code does not compile without errors with gcc -Wall. I'm getting warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type].
    – Kaz
    Nov 19 '19 at 0:00
6

Four problems:

  • missing the return statement on your strcompare
  • youwasn't updating the pointer of the char*
  • in C array that have 4 element, has the last element in index 3, so in the for loop condition, you have to check for<, not for <=
  • *str != '0' is wrong, you are checking if the char is the char 0, not the escape char, which is \0 so check for this char in this way *str != '\0'

With those things done, the code will be this:

#include <stdio.h>
int strcompare (char*);
int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int argIndex;
    for(argIndex = 1; argIndex < argc; argIndex++){
        strcompare(argv[argIndex]);
        printf("%s has %d letters in it\n", argv[argIndex], strcompare(argv[argIndex]));
    }
    return 0;
}

int strcompare (char *str){
     int letterDex;
     for (letterDex = 1; *str != '\0'; letterDex++){
         str++;
     }
     return letterDex;
}

Also the index variable was useless, so i've just removed it

0
1

It doesn't look like code which compiles. The function strcompare should return an int and in the implementation above it doesn't return anything. I assume there's a return letterDex; at the end of your function but you lost it when copying the code here.

In the for loop in the strcompare function you're comparing the *str to '0'. Now there are two things that are wrong here I think:

  1. You're comparing *str to '0' but you don't change the pointer value. So you're comparing the first character to '0' all the time. You should either do str[index] != '0' or instead of using index increment the pointer.

  2. I think that you want to look for a '\0' instead of '0'. The '\0' is a null terminator character meaning the end of the string.

The reason why you're not seeing anything happening is because you're stuck in an infinite loop.

1
  • 1
    missing the problem that cause segmentation fault inside the forloop in the main function Nov 19 '19 at 0:06

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