27

I have a challenge in JavaScript that I’m trying to figure out for a while already.

Consider this array:

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

I have to output this result:

arr = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]

I’m following this line of logic to position the zeros in front, adjusting the index value:

arr.sort((x, y) => {
    if (x !== 0) {
        return 1;
    }

    if (x === 0) {
        return -1;
    }

    return y - x;
});

But I’m stuck at this result:

arr = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Does anyone have any tips on how to solve this?

  • 5
    Is it guaranteed there are no negative numbers? – Michael Nov 19 at 20:57
  • 2
    Doesn't it fix if the last line is switched to return x - y;? – Mooing Duck Nov 19 at 22:24
  • 2
    Would it be efficient in JavaScript to count and remove zeros, sort the remaining elements normally? (without a custom comparator so hopefully the JS engine can use a built-in number-sorting function). Then prepend the right number of zeros to the result. If there are many zeros, removing them before sorting makes a smaller problem. Or swap the zeros to the start of the array with one pass, then sort the tail of the array? – Peter Cordes Nov 20 at 4:23
  • 2
    Does this ever even get to return y - x;? Even in javascript, I can't think of anything that would be neither ===0 nor !==0. – George T Nov 20 at 9:42
  • 2
    JSPerf for answers: jsperf.com/stackoverflow-question-58933996-v2 – Salman A Nov 21 at 7:01

10 Answers 10

28

You could sort by the delta of b and a (for descending sorting) and take Number.MAX_VALUE, for falsy values like zero.

This:

Number.MAX_VALUE - Number.MAX_VALUE

is equal to zero.

let array = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

array.sort((a, b) => (b || Number.MAX_VALUE) - (a || Number.MAX_VALUE));

console.log(...array);

  • 11
    Your comparison function will return NaN if both a and b are zero. This may be undesired behavior. – dan04 Nov 19 at 23:06
  • 18
    The results of Array.prototype.sort are implementation-defined if the comparator ever returns NaN, so this comparator is a bad idea. It tries to be clever, and gets it wrong. – user2357112 supports Monica Nov 20 at 0:11
  • 3
    What if an element inside the array is Infinity? The comparison function returns 0 when comparing an Infinity number to 0. – Marco Nov 20 at 8:15
  • 4
    thank you all. i take the greatest number which can be substracted by itself, and hope this number isn't used in op's array. – Nina Scholz Nov 20 at 8:37
  • 3
    Absolutely un-readable. Cool, but unreadable. – Salman A Nov 20 at 11:15
22

As mdn docs says:

If a and b are two elements being compared, then:

If compareFunction(a, b) returns less than 0, sort a to an index lower than b (i.e. a comes first).

If compareFunction(a, b) returns 0, leave a and b unchanged with respect to each other, but sorted with respect to all different elements. Note: the ECMAscript standard does not guarantee this behavior, thus, not all browsers (e.g. Mozilla versions dating back to at least 2003) respect this.

If compareFunction(a, b) returns greater than 0, sort b to an index lower than a (i.e. b comes first).

compareFunction(a, b) must always return the same value when given a specific pair of elements a and b as its two arguments. If inconsistent results are returned, then the sort order is undefined.

So, the compare function has the following form:

function compare(a, b) {
  if (a is less than b by some ordering criterion) {
    return -1;
  }
  if (a is greater than b by the ordering criterion) {
    return 1;
  }
  // a must be equal to b
  return 0;
}

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

arr.sort((x, y) => {
    if (x > 0 && y > 0) {
        return y - x;
    }
    return x - y;
});

console.log(arr);

  • 3
    +1 for giving what appears to be the only solution so far with a comparison function that's actually consistent (as defined in the standard) for all inputs, including negative numbers. – Ilmari Karonen Nov 20 at 2:58
  • 3
    @IlmariKaronen: Unfortunately, the comparison is consistent for negative numbers, but it's the wrong comparison for negative numbers. Negatives sort before 0 with this comparator, and they sort in ascending order. – user2357112 supports Monica Nov 20 at 8:37
  • 2
    @user2357112supportsMonica Nevertheless, OP has not specified the desired behaviour for negative numbers and, with this prototype, it is trivial to adjust the behaviour of negative numbers to fit whatever requirement OP has. What's good about this answer is that it is idiomatic and uses a standard comparison function to do the job. – J... Nov 20 at 20:01
12

If you care about efficiency, it's probably fastest to filter out the zeros first. You don't want sort to waste time even looking at them, let alone adding extra work to your comparison callback to handle that special case.

Especially if you expect a significant number of zeros, one pass over the data to filter them out should be much better than doing a larger O(N log N) sort that will look at each zero multiple times.

You can efficiently prepend the right number of zeros after you're done.

It's also just as easy to read the resulting code. I used TypedArray because it's efficient and makes numeric sorting easy. But you can use this technique with regular Array, using the standard idiom of (a,b)=>a-b for .sort.

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

let nonzero_arr = Int32Array.from(arr.filter(n => n != 0));
let zcount = arr.length - nonzero_arr.length;
nonzero_arr.sort();      // numeric TypedArray sorts numerically, not alphabetically

// Reverse the sorted part before copying into the final array.
nonzero_arr.reverse();

 // efficient-ish TypedArray for main result
let revsorted = new Int32Array(arr.length);   // zero-filled full size
revsorted.set(nonzero_arr, zcount);           // copy after the right number of zeros

console.log(Array.from(revsorted));      // prints strangely for TypedArray, with invented "0", "1" keys

/*
   // regular Array result
let sorted = [...Array(zcount).fill(0), ...nonzero_arr]  // IDK if this is efficient
console.log(sorted);
*/

I don't know if TypedArray .sort() and then .reverse is faster than using a custom comparison function to sort in descending order. Or if we can copy-and-reverse on the fly with an iterator.


Also worth considering: only use one TypedArray of the full length.

Instead of using .filter, loop over it and swap the zeros to the front of the array as you go. This takes one pass over your data.

Then use .subarray() to get a new TypedArray view of the non-zero elements of the same underlying ArrayBuffer. Sorting that will leave you the full array with a zero start and a sorted tail, with the sort only ever looking at the non-zero elements.

I didn't see a partition function in the Array or TypedArray methods, but I barely know JavaScript. With good JIT, a loop shouldn't be too much worse than a built-in method. (Especially when that method involves a callback like .filter, and unless it uses realloc under the hood to shrink, it has to figure out how much memory to allocate before it actually filters).

I used regular-Array .filter() before converting to a TypedArray. If your input is already a TypedArray you don't have this problem, and this strategy gets even more attractive.

  • This can probably be simpler, and/or more idiomatic, or at least more compact. IDK if JS engines manage to eliminate / optimize away a lot of the copying or zero-initializing, or if it would help to use loops instead of TypedArray methods e.g. to copy backwards instead of reverse + .set. I didn't get around to speed-testing it; if someone wants to do that I'd be interested. – Peter Cordes Nov 20 at 10:37
  • According to @Salman's testing this answer performs like crap for smallish arrays (of ~1000 elements, 10% of which are 0). Presumably all the creation of new arrays hurts. Or maybe careless mixing of TypedArray and regular? In-place partition inside a TypedArray into all-zero and non-zero + subarray sort might be much better, as suggested in the 2nd section of my answer. – Peter Cordes Nov 23 at 22:10
7

Just modify the condition of your compare function like this -

let arr = [-1, 0, 1, 0, 2, -2, 0, 3, -3, 0, 4, -4, 0, 5, -5];
arr.sort((a, b) => {
   if(a && b) return b-a;
   if(!a && !b) return 0;
   return !a ? -1 : 1;
});

console.log(arr);

  • 6
    This is not a consistent comparator if any of the inputs can be negative; according to your comparator, 0 sorts before 1 which sorts before -1 which sorts before 0. – Ilmari Karonen Nov 20 at 2:29
  • Updated with negative inputs – Harunur Rashid Nov 21 at 5:41
  • @SalmanA , If both are zero, the condition !a is still true. It will return -1 – Harunur Rashid Nov 21 at 8:01
  • I dont think thats a big deal is a and b both are zero @SalmanA – Harunur Rashid Nov 21 at 8:19
  • 1
    To be exact, I edited the answer. Just added a condition for a=b=0 – Harunur Rashid Nov 21 at 8:23
5

Not playing code golf here:

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5, -1];
arr.sort(function(a, b) {
  if (a === 0 && b !== 0) {
    // a is zero b is nonzero, a goes first
    return -1;
  } else if (a !== 0 && b === 0) {
    // a is nonzero b is zero, b goes first
    return 1;
  } else {
    // both are zero or both are nonzero, sort descending
    return b - a;
  }
});
console.log(arr.toString());

4

Don't write your own numeric sorting if it already exists. What you want to do is exactly what you say in the title; sort numbers in descending order except zeroes at the start.

const zeroSort = arr => [...arr.filter(n => n == 0),
                         ...new Float64Array(arr.filter(n => n != 0)).sort().reverse()];

console.log(zeroSort([0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 500]));

Don't write any code you don't need to; you might get it wrong.

Pick the TypedArray based on what Type of numbers you want the Array to handle. Float64 is a good default since it handles all normal JS numbers.

  • @IlmariKaronen Better? – JollyJoker Nov 20 at 12:26
  • You don't need to filter twice; as my answer shows you can filter once and subtract lengths to get a number for Array(n).fill(0). – Peter Cordes Nov 20 at 14:14
  • @PeterCordes Although it could possibly be called simpler, I think the code gets long enough to be less easy to read – JollyJoker Nov 20 at 14:41
  • Yes, efficiency would require a 1 extra line for a tmp var. My answer uses multiple extra lines because I'm used to C and C++ and assembly language, and having more separate lines makes it easier to trace compiler-generated asm back to the statement responsible for it when optimizing / profiling. Plus I don't normally do JS so I didn't feel any need to cram it all onto a couple lines. But you could do let f64arr = new Float64Array(arr.filter(n => n != 0)), then [ ...Array(arr.length - f64arr.length).fill(0), ... so it adds 1 extra line and simplifies the last line. – Peter Cordes Nov 20 at 14:47
3

You can do this like this:

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

let result = arr.sort((a,b) => {
  if(a == 0 || b == 0)
    return a-b;
  return b-a;
})
console.log(result)

or you can do this:

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

let result = arr.sort().sort((a,b) => {
  if(a > 0 && b > 0)
    return b-a
  return 0
})

console.log(result)

  • 4
    Your first solution has the same consistency issue with negative inputs as Harunur Rashid's answer. The second one is consistent, but treats all negative numbers as equal to zero, leaving their mutual sort order undefined. – Ilmari Karonen Nov 20 at 2:52
0

Trying to keep it as simple and readable as possible:

const arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

arr.sort((a, b) => {
  if (a === 0) {
    return -1;
  } else if (b === 0) {
    return 1;
  }
  return b - a;
});

console.info(arr);

If either is zero, zero comes first; otherwise, sort in descending order.

  • Thanks, this is very readable :) – lianbwl Nov 28 at 20:05
  • This doesn't work: it needs to return 0 if both a and b are 0. – Bergi Nov 28 at 20:27
  • @Bergi that's not true. If both are zero, it doesn't really matter who comes first :-) – Lucio Paiva Nov 29 at 21:31
-2

Try it with sorting the array another time:

let arr = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];

arr.sort((x, y) => {
    return y > x ? 1 : -1;
}).sort((x, y) => {
    if (x === 0) { return -1; } return 0;
})
  • 6
    The comparator in your first sort is also technically not consistent, since it's possible for compare(a, b) and compare(b, a) to both be negative, implying that a should be sorted both before and after b. Specifically, this happens whenever a and b are numerically equal. While most .sort() implementations will probably handle this minor inconsistency without even really noticing this, it still breaks the contract and could cause some sorting algorithms to produce incorrectly sorted results. To fix it, use either y > x ? 1 : y < x ? -1 : 0 or just the y - x kluge. – Ilmari Karonen Nov 20 at 2:50
  • arr.sort().reverse() would also work for the initial sort, avoiding the need to build a custom compare function. – KOVIKO Nov 25 at 15:56
-2

const myArray = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5];
const splitArray = myArray.reduce((output, item) => {
     if(!item) output[0].push(item);
    else output[1].push(item);
    return output;
}, [[], []]);
const result = [...splitArray[0], ...splitArray[1].reverse()]
console.log(result);

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