8

What is the correct way to declare and use a FILE * pointer in C/C++? Should it be declared global or local? Can somebody show a good example?

18

It doesn't matter at all whether it's local or global. The scope of the file pointer has nothing to do with its use.

In general, it's a good idea to avoid global variables as much as possible.

Here's a sample showing how to copy from input.txt to output.txt:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
    FILE *fin, *fout; int c;

    // Open both files, fail fast if either no good.

    if ((fin = fopen("input.txt", "r")) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot read from input.txt");
        return 1;
    }

    if ((fout = fopen("output.txt", "w")) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot write to output.txt");
        fclose(fin);
        return 1;
    }

    // Transfer character by character.

    while ((c = fgetc(fin)) >= 0) {
        fputc (c, fout);
    }

    // Close both files and exit.

    fclose(fin);
    fclose(fout);

    return 0;
}
4

It's just an ordinary pointer like any other.

FILE *CreateLogFile() 
{
    return fopen("logfile.txt","w"); // allocates a FILE object and returns a pointer to it
}

void UsefulFunction()
{
   FILE *pLog = CreateLogFile(); // it's safe to return a pointer from a func
   int resultsOfWork = DoSomeWork();
   fprintf( pLog, "Work did %d\n", resultsOfWork );  // you can pass it to other functions
   fclose( pLog ); // just be sure to clean it up when you are done with fclose()
   pLog = NULL;    // and it's a good idea to overwrite the pointer afterwards
                   // so it's obvious you deleted what it points to
}
1

Here is the first hit on google for "file io in c"

http://www.cs.bu.edu/teaching/c/file-io/intro/

Here is the third hit from gamedev with more of a C++ slant

http://www.gamedev.net/reference/articles/article1127.asp

You declare the pointer in the scope that you need it.

1
int main(void)
{
  char c;
  FILE *read;
  read = fopen("myfile", "r"); // opens "myfile" for reading
  if(read == NULL)
  {
    perror("Error: could not open \"myfile\" for reading.\n");
    exit(1);
  }
  c = fgetc(read);
  fclose(read);
  printf("The first character of myfile is %c.\n", c);
  return 0;
}

You're perfectly allowed to declare global filehandles if you like, just like any other variable, but it may not be recommended.

This is the C way. C++ can use this, but I think there's a more C++ friendly way of doing it. As a note, I hate it when questions are marked C/C++, because C and C++ are not the same language and do not work the same. C++ has a lot of different ways to do things that C doesn't have, and they may be easier for you to do in the context of C++ but are not valid C. So while this will work for either language, it's not what you want if you predominantly use C++.

EDIT: Added some error checking. Always use error checking in your code.

0

First, keep in mind that a file pointer (and the associated allocated structure) is based on the lower level open() read() write() calls. The associated file descriptor (obtained by fileno(file_pointer) is the least interesting thing, but something you might want to watch your scope with.

If your going to declare a file pointer as global in a module, its usually a very good idea to keep it static (contained within that module / object file). Sometimes this is a little easier than storing it in a structure that is passed from function to function if you need to write something in a hurry.

For instance, (bad)

#include <stdio.h>
#include ...

#define MY_LOG_FILE "file.txt"

FILE *logfile

Better done as:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MY_LOG_FILE "file.txt"

static FILE *logfile;

int main(void)
{

UNLESS, you need several modules to have access to that pointer, in which case you're better off putting it in a structure that can be passed around.

If its needed only in one module, consider declaring it in main() and letting other functions accept a file pointer as an argument. So, unless your functions within the module have so many arguments that another would be unbearable .. there's (usually) no reason to declare a file pointer globally.

Some logging libraries do it, which I don't care for ... especially when dealing with re-entrant functions. Nevermind C's monolithic namespace :)

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.