58

I have the following code

For x = LBound(arr) To UBound(arr)

    sname = arr(x)  
    If instr(sname, "Configuration item") Then  
        '**(here i want to go to next x in loop and not complete the code below)**  

    '// other code to copy past and do various stuff

Next x  

So I thought I could simply have the statement Then Next x, but this gives a "no for statement declared" error.

So what can I put after the If instr(sname, "Configuration item") Then to make it proceed to the next value for x?

  • Thank you to people correcting me spelling, I know I suck at it, and am grateful that people would take time to help me with it. Cheers – DevilWAH Nov 20 '13 at 13:59
45

You're thinking of a continue statement like Java's or Python's, but VBA has no such native statement, and you can't use VBA's Next like that.

You could achieve something like what you're trying to do using a GoTo statement instead, but really, GoTo should be reserved for cases where the alternatives are contrived and impractical.

In your case with a single "continue" condition, there's a really simple, clean, and readable alternative:

    If Not InStr(sname, "Configuration item") Then
        '// other code to copy paste and do various stuff
    End If
  • 8
    This is less clean and readable when you have several conditions like throughout your loop. As the code gets more deeply nested it requires more headspace for the coder trying to read it. For that reason GoTo might be better here, and Arlen Beiler's answer is another decent solution. – pettys May 27 '16 at 15:32
  • 1
    I agree, those would be better answers — to a different question. Not to this one. – Jean-François Corbett May 28 '16 at 10:18
  • It sounds like we agree that, for those looking for a more general approach to VBA's lack of a "continue" statement, the alternative answers below have advantages. My intent was simply to deepen the discussion by weighing the trade-offs in the general case. – pettys May 31 '16 at 17:26
  • I work by a rule: "Check your preconditions, if they fail, then bail" Start of a method, or start of a loop, same deal. I'd use continue if I could, but instead I use a Goto because it stops levels of nesting. – Roger Willcocks Apr 17 '18 at 2:16
  • I'm not sure why everyone here is focusing on "multiple levels of nesting" when the question clearly has only one?... – Jean-François Corbett Dec 15 '18 at 15:34
82

You can use a GoTo:

Do

    '... do stuff your loop will be doing

    ' skip to the end of the loop if necessary:
    If <condition-to-go-to-next-iteration> Then GoTo ContinueLoop 

    '... do other stuff if the condition is not met

ContinueLoop:
Loop
18

A lot of years after... I like this one:

For x = LBound(arr) To UBound(arr): Do

    sname = arr(x)  
    If instr(sname, "Configuration item") Then Exit Do 

    '// other code to copy past and do various stuff

Loop While False: Next x
14
For i=1 To 10
    Do 
        'Do everything in here and

        If I_Dont_Want_Finish_This_Loop Then
            Exit Do
        End If 

        'Of course, if I do want to finish it,
        'I put more stuff here, and then...

    Loop While False 'quit after one loop
Next i
  • This looks to be the neatest way to get out of using Goto for continuing For loops I've seen. I Imagine you could adapt the same approach for avoiding Goto in other circumstances too, for that matter... – tobriand May 29 '15 at 16:24
  • 1
    Good answer. Alfredo Yong's answer is the same idea, but Alfredo's answer's compactness makes it more readable for me. – pettys May 27 '16 at 15:33
  • Wow. Ladies and gentleman, the "Do Once or Exit Do to Continue" idiom. – Jean-François Corbett Apr 18 '18 at 8:26
8

A few years late, but here is another alternative.

For x = LBound(arr) To UBound(arr)
    sname = arr(x)  
    If InStr(sname, "Configuration item") Then  
        'Do nothing here, which automatically go to the next iteration
    Else
        'Code to perform the required action
    End If
Next x
  • 2
    yeah, but this is the standard choice for the problem at hand causing ugly nesting if it is more than one continue condition – Andreas Dietrich Dec 17 '18 at 9:58
0

This can also be solved using a boolean.

For Each rngCol In rngAll.Columns
    doCol = False '<==== Resets to False at top of each column
    For Each cell In Selection
        If cell.row = 1 Then
            If thisColumnShouldBeProcessed Then doCol = True
        End If
        If doCol Then
            'Do what you want to do to each cell in this column
        End If
    Next cell
Next rngCol

For example, here is the full example that:
(1) Identifies range of used cells on worksheet
(2) Loops through each column
(3) IF column title is an accepted title, Loops through all cells in the column

Sub HowToSkipForLoopIfConditionNotMet()
    Dim rngCol, rngAll, cell As Range, cnt As Long, doCol, cellValType As Boolean
    Set rngAll = Range("A1").CurrentRegion
    'MsgBox R.Address(0, 0), , "All data"
    cnt = 0
    For Each rngCol In rngAll.Columns
        rngCol.Select
        doCol = False
        For Each cell In Selection
            If cell.row = 1 Then
                If cell.Value = "AnAllowedColumnTitle" Then doCol = True
            End If
            If doCol Then '<============== THIS LINE ==========
                cnt = cnt + 1
                Debug.Print ("[" & cell.Value & "]" & " / " & cell.Address & " / " & cell.Column & " / " & cell.row)
                If cnt > 5 Then End '<=== NOT NEEDED. Just prevents too much demo output.
            End If
        Next cell
    Next rngCol
End Sub

Note: If you didn't immediately catch it, the line If docol Then is your inverted CONTINUE. That is, if doCol remains False, the script CONTINUES to the next cell and doesn't do anything.

Certainly not as fast/efficient as a proper continue or next for statement, but the end result is as close as I've been able to get.

-1

I sometimes do a double do loop:

Do

    Do

        If I_Don't_Want_to_Finish_This_Loop Then Exit Do

        Exit Do

    Loop

Loop Until Done

This avoids having "goto spaghetti"

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