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My webapp webapp has two tables already registered in models.py. Let's call them Model1 and Model2. They're built, they work, they're both registered in my webapp's admin.py and the entire webapp is running. I can go to the admin console (/admin) and see that both the tables are there, and I can look through them.

I wanted to add a third table, Model3. I wrote out the code in models.py - it looks very similar to the other two models, with slightly different fields. I modified admin.py to include it, like the other two. I then deleted the migrations folder and I did the following Django commands:

$ python manage.py makemigrations webapp
Migrations for 'webapp':
  webapp/migrations/0001_initial.py
    - Create model Model1
    - Create model Model3
    - Create model Model2
$ python manage.py migrate webapp
Operations to perform:
  Apply all migrations: admin, webapp, auth, contenttypes, sessions
Running migrations:
  Applying auth.0010_alter_group_name_max_length... OK
  Applying auth.0011_update_proxy_permissions... OK

I'm not sure what those migrations are that are actually getting run (I haven't changed Model1 and Model2 recently). When I run the webapp and enter the admin console, Model3 appears along with Model1 and Model2, but clicking on it yields the following error:

Internal Server Error: /admin/webapp/model3/
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/.../venv/lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/utils.py", line 84, in _execute
    return self.cursor.execute(sql, params)
  File "/.../venv/lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/sqlite3/base.py", line 383, in execute
    return Database.Cursor.execute(self, query, params)
sqlite3.OperationalError: no such table: webapp_model3

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/.../venv/lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/core/handlers/exception.py", line 34, in inner
    response = get_response(request)
  File "/.../lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/core/handlers/base.py", line 115, in _get_response
    response = self.process_exception_by_middleware(e, request)
  ... 
  (24 frames omitted)
  ...
  File "/.../venv/lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/utils.py", line 84, in _execute
    return self.cursor.execute(sql, params)
  File "/.../venv/lib/python3.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/sqlite3/base.py", line 383, in execute
    return Database.Cursor.execute(self, query, params)
django.db.utils.OperationalError: no such table: webapp_model3

I also get this type of error when I try to access the model programmatically (importing it from models.py works fine, but actually accessing Model3.objects triggers the error).

I'm sure I've forgotten to do something, but I'm at a loss as to what.

This is using the default sqlite database that Django provides out-of-the-box. I cannot delete my database altogether - having to repopulate it with the same information it currently has is troublesome for reasons that are not relevant to this question. I can restore from recent backup as much as I want, and I've been doing that as I test solutions to this. In the past, I've been able to make modifications to Model1 and Model2 without needing to delete and recreate the database.


The contents of the generated webapp/migrations/0001_initial.py are:

# Generated by Django 2.2.5 on 2019-11-20 18:55

import webapp.models
from django.db import migrations, models
import django.db.models.deletion


class Migration(migrations.Migration):

    initial = True

    dependencies = [
    ]

    operations = [
        migrations.CreateModel(
            name='Model1',
            fields=[
                ('key1', models.FloatField(blank=True, primary_key=True, serialize=False)),
                ('key2', models.CharField(default=None, max_length=10)),
                ('key3', models.CharField(default=None, max_length=100)),
                ('key4', models.TextField(blank=True, default=None, null=True)),
                ('key5', models.ImageField(blank=True, default=None, upload_to=webapp.models.func1)),
            ],
        ),
        migrations.CreateModel(
            name='Model3',
            fields=[
                ('NewKey1', models.FloatField(blank=True, primary_key=True, serialize=False)),
                ('NewKey2', models.CharField(default=None, editable=False, max_length=10)),
                ('NewKey3', models.CharField(default=None, editable=False, max_length=100)),
                ('NewKey4', models.TextField(blank=True, default=None, editable=False, null=True)),
                ('NewKey5', models.TextField()),
            ],
        ),
        migrations.CreateModel(
            name='Model2',
            fields=[
                ('KeyA', models.IntegerField(primary_key=True, serialize=False)),
                ('KeyB', models.CharField(default=None, max_length=100)),
                ('KeyC', models.CharField(default=None, max_length=100)),
                ('KeyD', models.CharField(default=None, max_length=100)),
                ('KeyE', models.TextField(blank=True, default=None, null=True)),
                ('KeyF', models.ImageField(default=None, upload_to=webapp.models.func2)),
                ('KeyG', models.ImageField(default=None, upload_to=webapp.models.func3)),
                ('KeyH', models.BooleanField(default=False)),
                ('KeyI', models.ForeignKey(on_delete=django.db.models.deletion.CASCADE, to='webapp.Model1')),
            ],
        ),
    ]

  • Please edit your question and add the content of the migration file webapp/migrations/0001_initial.py. – heemayl Nov 20 '19 at 19:12
  • @heemayl Added the contents of 0001_initial.py, after anonymizing it to fit with the MCVE – Green Cloak Guy Nov 20 '19 at 19:21
  • Okay. Django actually keeps a table to keep track of already applied migrations. So presumably the 0001_initial.py has already been applied hence Django did not run it. Create a new file e.g. 0002_auto_20191120.py and put only the migrations.CreateModel chunk for Model3 from the 0001_initial file. Also put 0001_initial as a dependency (put inside dependencies). Then run migrate. – heemayl Nov 20 '19 at 19:24
  • @heemayl That worked. Specifically, just removing the _initial migration file and replacing it with 0001_auto_20192210.py, which contained only the Model3 chunk (if I didn't, it gave me an error about multiple leaf nodes or something). And then finally running migrate. Can you add that as a full answer? – Green Cloak Guy Nov 20 '19 at 19:32
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Django uses django_migrations table to keep track of all the already applied migrations. So presumably the 0001_initial has already been applied hence Django did not run it on migrate.

You need to:

  • create a new migration file yourself e.g. 0001_auto_20191120.py
  • put only the migrations.CreateModel chunk for Model3 from the 0001_initial.py file
  • put 0001_initial as a dependency (put inside the dependencies list of the migration file)
  • run python manage.py migrate webapp

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