11

All the constructors of std::span are declared constexpr, however I can't seem to get any of them to work in a constexpr context. Uncommenting any of the constexpr below will result in a compilation error.

#include <array>
#include <span>

int main()
{
    constexpr int carray[3] = { 0, 1, 2 };
    constexpr std::array<int, 3> array{ 0, 1, 2 };
    using S = std::span<const int, 3>;

    /*constexpr*/ S span1{ array.data(), 3 };
    /*constexpr*/ S span2{array.begin(), array.end()};
    /*constexpr*/ S span3{carray};
    /*constexpr*/ S span4{array};
}

Is it in fact possible to create a constexpr span type, since it seems like constructors can never be evaluated at compile time when they have to initialize a pointer or reference?

13

You can't use non-static function local variables in a constant expression like that. You need address stability and that is only achieved by static objects. Modifying the code to

constexpr std::array<int, 3> array{ 0, 1, 2 };
constexpr int carray[3] = { 0, 1, 2 };

int main()
{
    using S = std::span<const int, 3>;

    constexpr S span1{ array.data(), 3 };
    constexpr S span2{array.begin(), array.end()};
    constexpr S span3{carray};
    constexpr S span4{array};
}

or

int main()
{
    static constexpr std::array<int, 3> array{ 0, 1, 2 };
    static constexpr int carray[3] = { 0, 1, 2 };
    using S = std::span<const int, 3>;

    constexpr S span1{ array.data(), 3 };
    constexpr S span2{array.begin(), array.end()};
    constexpr S span3{carray};
    constexpr S span4{array};
}

Allows you to create a constexpr std::span.

  • 5
    Scope is not the problem. Storage duration is. Static local should work. – eerorika Nov 20 at 19:48
  • It also works if all are function local objects within a constexpr function (without explicit static). Do such objects have default static storage duration or is this something different? – n314159 Nov 20 at 19:57
  • @n314159 I'm not sure if that is allowed or if you've fallen into the dreaded: if no specialization of a constexpr function is a core constant expression the function is ill-formed, no diagnostic required clause. [expr.const]/10 only allows static variables. – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Nov 20 at 20:06
  • @n314159: I’m not sure exactly what you’re saying works (or “works”), but be careful of the difference between using something as a constant expression in a function (constexpr or no) and using something to construct a constant expression via a constexpr function. – Davis Herring Nov 21 at 1:51
  • You might want to say that non-static (constant) values can be used in constant expressions, but not their addresses. – Davis Herring Nov 21 at 3:34

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