12

I'm an intro computer science student working in Python 3.7.1.

We were working with "Additorials" where you take a number and take get the sum of the number plus every number before it. Ie: for the number 10-- 10+1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9 = 55

I had to write a program that performed this operation as a function. However, I did it in a way that shouldn't work, but it does.

def bigAdd(n):
    for i in range(0,n):
        n+=i
    return n

for example, if I input the number 10, it returns 55

But... Why?

If the upper limit of this loop is n, and it is constantly being incremented by i, shouldn't it run forever because it is constantly raising its limit? Why does it return any answer, let alone the correct one?

  • 3
    The value of n is used once to create the range, any subsequent changes in value have no effect on the existing range. – Alexander Cécile Nov 21 at 17:05
  • The "range" object is created once when the loop is entered first and in turn produces an iterator once. Both isn't affected by changes of n afterwards. – Michael Butscher Nov 21 at 17:06
  • @AlexanderCécile and [@]MichaelButscher - your comments are the answer to OP's question (the other answers are correctly shocked by the non-initialized + bad loop range working) – Cireo Nov 22 at 5:15
  • @Cireo The current top answer does mention it, but somehow calls it the “second question”... What do you mean by correctly shocked ? – Alexander Cécile Nov 22 at 5:22
  • @AlexanderCécile the structure is non-intuitive, not to the point where it seems obfuscated or golfed a la sum(range(2*x-1,0,-2)), but n still is the parameter, the return and the loop boundary, and the order of addition is n + 0 + 1 + 2 + ... + n-1 (I see that this ordering is from his "Additorial" definition). All this is not intended as a critique, I don't think it was deliberate – Cireo Nov 22 at 5:36
20

You are adding to n, which initially is 10 (or whichever upper bound you are using). Thus your result is indeed 10 (the initial value) + 0 + 1 + ... + 9 (from the range).

Having said that, I'd still recomment not using the initial value of n and instead getting the sum of range(1, n+1), as that's much clearer.

>>> sum(range(1, n+1))
55

Or if you want to show off:

>>> n*(n+1)//2
55

About your second question:1 No, the range(0, n) is evaluated only once, when the for loop is first entered, not in each iteration. You can think of the code as being roughly2 equivalent to this:

r = range(0, n) # [0, 1, 2, 3, ..., n-2, n-1]
for i in r:
    n+=i

In particular, Python's for ... in ... loop is not the "typical" for (initialization; condition; action) loop known from Java, C, and others, but more akin to a "for-each" loop, iterating over each element of a given collections, generator, or other kind of iterable.

1) Which, I now realise, is actually your actual question...

2) Yes, a range does not create a list but a special kind of iterable, that's why I said "roughly".

  • You might want to explain what "range(0, n) is evaluated only once" actually means. – Mars Nov 22 at 6:39
14

range(0,n) is evaluated once before the loop is entered.

This isn't like a typical for loop from other languages that has a condition that is constantly checked. range returns a range object that produces numbers, and the upper limit is set when the range object is created. Changing n has no effect on the range object that's already been constructed.

4

This is because int values are immutable and range captures that particular instance only once at the beginning.

When inside the loop, the variable n which was pointing to the value 10 initially is re-pointing everytime to a new int instance when you are adding some number to it. And since range is evaluated only once it keeps the reference to the original int instance 10.

The int instance which is referenced by the range function at the beginning, is not at all mutated in the for-loop and is still pointing the int instance value of 10.

That is why the loop is completed even though n is now pointing to a different number every time.

Try this example snippet, you can prove this:

def bigAdd(n):
    for i in range(0,n):
        #temp captures the int before the addition
        temp = n
        n+=i
        print(temp is n)
    return n

The output is:

bigAdd(10)
True
False
False
False
False
False
False
False
False
False
Out[8]: 55

The first line prints True as 10 + 0 is 10 so both are the same instance.

  • 3
    This i believe is the more correct answer especially in reference to OPs background in the question. – Jab Nov 21 at 17:09
  • 2
    I think this answer is somewhat misleading, and the conclusion is incorrect. As noted in @Carcigenicate's answer, the reason that modifying n doesn't matter is because range is evaluated once. Using a mutable value would give the same effect. x = [n]; for i in range(0, x[0]): x[0]+= i will also complete. – Cireo Nov 22 at 5:42
  • 1
    @Cireo x[0] isn't a mutable value-- x is mutable and contains an immutable at index 0 – Mars Nov 22 at 6:07
  • 3
    range(start, stop) is a constructor. stop gets set to the value of n. stop is then holds it's own value--it's pointing to '10', not to n. – Mars Nov 22 at 6:13
  • 2
    The reason that the first statement prints true is not because temp and n are pointing at each other, the first statement prints true because the immutable object 10 was created in memory. The system remembers this immutable object, so now any time something is equal to "10", it points to that cached memory. – Mars Nov 22 at 6:28
2

As I understand it when you have range(0,n) you define a generator with upper limit 10, because n was 10, and after that the generator doesn't change.

2

The range() function returns a series of numbers on first instance. In your case, from 0 to n-1. So, if you call bigAdd(10), you'll get numbers from 0 to 9.

The function then increments the originally-input number (in your case, 10) by the sum of all the smaller numbers (in this case, 0 + 1 + ... + 9) which is 45. So, adding the 45 to the original 10 gives you 55.

  • 1
    That's true in py2, but not so in py3. Py3 will generate the numbers 1 at a time – Mars Nov 22 at 6:24
1

The range function is taking a value of n as its upper bound which prevents the for loop from funning forever. The for loop stops when i has the same value as n (which in the example you gave is 10.

So your code

for i in range(0,n):

is the equivalent of saying "first let i have a value of 0, then on the next iteration of the loop, let i have a value of 1, ..... and so on until i has a value of 10".

1

Well, you can solve this problem in a loop, but why not use the Gaußsche Summenformel (sorry for the German link, I couldn't find the english name of it), which is indeed

n (n+1)
-------
   2

Put this in a function and return the value:

def gaussian_sum(n):
    return (n * (n+1)) // 2
  • 1
    The result is always an integer, so // 2 is better. – L. F. Nov 22 at 8:33
  • 3
    While a completely right answer when the question was "how can I compute this number", it completely ignores the understanding issue with the for loop. – glglgl Nov 22 at 9:27
  • @L.F. thanks, I added it. – Christoph Jüngling Nov 24 at 10:47

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