4

I'd like to reuse the parsing logic of << ... >> on a string to get back a list as a result. Say, I already have the string in a variable, $input, how can I parse it without using EVAL (e.g., EVAL "<< $input >>")?

A more general question from this is perhaps: How can I reuse any of the parsing logic used by various quoting constructs (e.g., qqww:v:!c)?

5

For your particular example you could use val:

my $a = 42;
say << $a b c       >>.perl;       # (IntStr.new(42, "42"), "b", "c")
say ("$a", "b", "c")>>.&val.perl;  # same
say << "$a b" c     >>.perl;       # ("42 b", "c")
say ("$a b", "c"   )>>.&val.perl;  # same

But you'd have to know about val.

I'd like to reuse the parsing logic of << ... >> on a string to get back a list as a result.

You could spelunk the Rakudo compiler's source code to zoom in on what function is getting called. Thus you might discover that val is the relevant function for your example.

Parsing of language constructs starts with Grammar.nqp.

An in-page search for << yields a LOT of matches. I happen to know that the << ... >> construct is a "circumfix" operator. So a few seconds later I'm at the line in Grammar.nqp where its parsing starts. Reformatted onto several lines the line boils down to

token circumfix:sym«<< >>» {

  :dba('shell-quote words')

  '<<' ~ '>>'

  <nibble(
    self.quote_lang(
      self.slang_grammar('Quote'),
      "<<", ">>", ['qq', 'ww', 'v']
    )
  )>

}

The trail then immediately goes cold. There's a quote_lang method in the same source file but it's clearly too high level. Where is slang_grammar defined?

If you encounter such a dead end the next place to look is NQP. And sure enough we find matches there.

But now what? Really, this is all far too complicated.

A more general question from this is perhaps: How can I reuse any of the parsing logic used by various quoting constructs (e.g., qqww:v:!c)?

Indeed.

Another route, often better that spelunking the source code, is to read the doc. But in this case I'm not finding an obvious path from qq:ww:v to val.

Which leads to a third route -- post an SO question. :)


This answer is... incomplete. But I'm going to publish it as is anyway in the hope it's helpful and/or I'll have time to improve it tonight or tomorrow. Or, better still, maybe someone has a better answer.

  • Thanks, I appreciate your help and effort. The amount of syntax and features in Raku make it a rich and powerful language, but also very complex. I know the grammar for parsing the Q lang is probably in Grammar.nqp, but that file has 5000+ lines..., and I've yet to learn Grammar and NQP. – cowbaymoo Nov 22 at 20:12
  • 1
    cowbaymoo : the QGrammar is found here: github.com/rakudo/rakudo/blob/… – user0721090601 Nov 24 at 1:58

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