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How can I find out the disk usage of a single table inside a SQLite database without copying it in a new empty database?

77

You can use sqlite3_analyzer from http://www.sqlite.org/download.html.

It's a really cool tool. It shows you the number of pages used by each table with and without indexes (each page, by default, is 1024 bytes).

This is a sample sqlite3_analyzer output for the Northwind database:

*** Page counts for all tables with their indices ********************

EMPLOYEES............................. 200         34.4% 
ORDERS................................ 152         26.2% 
CATEGORIES............................ 90          15.5% 
ORDER DETAILS......................... 81          13.9% 
CUSTOMERS............................. 17           2.9% 
SQLITE_MASTER......................... 11           1.9% 
PRODUCTS.............................. 7            1.2% 
SUPPLIERS............................. 7            1.2% 
TERRITORIES........................... 6            1.0% 
CUSTOMERCUSTOMERDEMO.................. 2            0.34% 
CUSTOMERDEMOGRAPHICS.................. 2            0.34% 
EMPLOYEETERRITORIES................... 2            0.34% 
REGION................................ 2            0.34% 
SHIPPERS.............................. 2            0.34% 

It also generates SQL statements which can be used to create a database with usage statistics, which you can then analyze.

  • Thanks you very much! Just what I was looking for... – MrMage Jul 29 '12 at 15:13
  • 1
    Beware, sqlite3_analyze takes a long time to run. – alecco May 29 '13 at 20:22
  • Haha! So this is what sqlite3_analyzer does! – Alix Axel Jun 3 '13 at 13:33
  • Oh my god!! A very great tool!! I've squeezed the sqlite site tons of times and I've never realized on it. – Peregring-lk Jun 5 '15 at 23:21
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    How does it work on linux? I unzipped it, but I cannot start it – rubo77 Aug 21 '16 at 21:52
5

I realize that this answer totally violates the spirit of the question, but it does get you the size without copying the file...

$ ls -lh db.sqlite
-rw-r--r-- 1 dude bros 44M Jan 11 18:44 db.sqlite
$ sqlite3 db.sqlite
sqlite> drop table my_table;
sqlite> vacuum;
sqlite> ^D
$ ls -lh db.sqlite
-rw-r--r-- 1 dude bros 23M Jan 11 18:44 db.sqlite
  • That's sneaky! I'd suggest to add a comment above the code that explains what the snippet does, it took me a few moments. – Moot Jan 24 '18 at 22:49
  • Are you sure it didn't copy the file underneath? The vacuum needs as much disk space as the size of the db, at least, I think (I'm not too sure about this, but some stuff I think I remember reading, and my experiments with nearly full partitions, lead me to believe something like that to be the case.) – msouth Jan 26 at 18:16
  • also, the space you recovered via the vacuum might have been reclaimed from other tables, so you probably need to vacuum; test file size; drop table; vacuum; test file size – msouth Jan 26 at 18:17
1

If you are on linux or OSX, or otherwise have the unix utilities awk (and optionally, sort) available, you can do the following to get counts and estimated size via dump analysis:

# substitute '.dump' for '.dump mytable' if you want to limit to specific table
sqlite3 db.sqlite3 '.dump' | awk -f sqlite3_size.awk | sort -k3 -n -r

which returns:

table            count   est. size
my_biggest_table 1090    60733958
my_table2        26919   7796902
my_table3        10390   2732068

and uses awk script:

/INSERT INTO/ {                              # parse INSERT commands
    split($0, name, "\"");                   # extract "xxx" from INSERT INTO "xxx"
    split($0, values, "VALUES");             # extract everything after VALUES
    gsub(/[\047,]/, "", values[2]);          # remove single-quotes and commas
    sizes[name[2]] += length(values[2]) - 3; # subtract 3 for parens and semicolon
    counts[name[2]] += 1;
}

END {
    print "table\tcount\test. size"
    for(k in sizes) {
        # print and sort in descending order
        print k "\t" counts[k] "\t" sizes[k] | "sort -k3 -n -r";
    }
}

The estimated size is based on the string length of the "INSERT INTO" command, and so is not going to equal the actual size on disk, but for me, count plus the estimated size is more useful than other alternatives such as page count.

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