1

For example i have some data

df = pd.DataFrame(np.array([[1, 2, 3], [-6, -5, -4], [7, 8, 9]]), columns=['a', 'b', 'c'])

I want the output to be {'a': 1, 'b': 0, 'c': 2}

Where one row has an absolute max in column 'a' (2nd row where the absolute max of that row -6, is column 'a'), 0 rows have absmax in column 'b', and 2 rows have absmax in column 'c' (3 and 9)

  • 6
    df.abs().idxmax(axis=1).value_counts().reindex(df.columns, fill_value=0) – piRSquared Nov 22 '19 at 21:59
  • Damn @piRSquared, you beat me to the punch. Probably worth posting as an answer. – James Nov 22 '19 at 22:01
3

piR has a nice solution using idxmax in the comments.

df.abs().idxmax(axis=1).value_counts().reindex([*df], fill_value=0).to_dict()
# {'a': 1, 'b': 0, 'c': 2}

As an alternative, you can bypass the reindex step if you convert the result into a Categorical array:

pd.Categorical(df.abs().idxmax(axis=1), categories=[*df]).value_counts().to_dict()
# {'a': 1, 'b': 0, 'c': 2}

There's no reason to prefer one over the other, this is just another way of doing it.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    GOLFED: {**pd.Categorical(df.abs().idxmax(1), [*df]).value_counts()} – piRSquared Nov 25 '19 at 15:18

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