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I'm trying to catch errors when calling a procedure in Entity Framework Core 3.0, but it never hits the catch block. I tried forcing a couple of common errors like the wrong procedure name, or wrong number of parameters.

I can actually step through the code, which doesn't error out, and I can see these messages in the results view.
Invalid object name...
An insufficient number of arguments were supplied for the procedure or function...

What am I missing here? How can I catch errors like this?

        try
        {
            IEnumerable<Users> result = (from x in _db.Users.FromSqlRaw("Execute ustp_MyProcedure)").AsEnumerable()
                                         select x);
            return result;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Never gets here
        }

UPDATE
I'm still confused why EntityFramework Core 3.0 would behave differently than EF6 that I'm using in an older MVC application. I'm still using IEnumerable here, but errors in this setup DO end up in the catch block.

    private DatabseEntities db = new DatabseEntities();


    public IEnumerable<ustp_MyProcedure_Result> MyMethod(string searchString)
    {
        try
        {
            var result= (from p in db.ustp_MyProcedure(searchString)
                               select p);

            return sourceQuery;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Even as an IEnumerable, errors DO end up in this catch block
        }
    }
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2

You are assigning the result of a query to an IEnumerable variable. IEnumerable represents an unmaterialized collection. It doesn't have any items inside until it is enumerated. The database query, which you've assigned to the IEnumerable will be executed only, when the IEnumerable is enumerated.

This happens for instance, when you use it in a foreach loop, call a ToList(), ToArray() or any other LINQ method on it.

You are only getting the exception in results view. Because checking the results view materializes the collection and executes the DB query.

If you change your code to:

try
    {
        IEnumerable<Users> result = (from x in _db.Users.FromSqlRaw("Execute ustp_MyProcedure)").AsEnumerable()
                                     select x);
        return result.ToList();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        //Never gets here
    }

The exception will be raised in the try block.

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  • Let me ask this though, would it be bad practice or bad performance to return all of my procedure calls as lists? I'm looking for a recommended method of working with data like this. I just don't like the idea of unknown errors when working with IEnumerable. – madvora Nov 23 '19 at 3:39
  • 1
    An unmaterialized IEnumerable has to be materialized at some point, sooner or later. Hence, performing materialization once won't be an issue. Some errors may lead to bad performance. Like using the result IEnumerable to perform multiple queries. Each time you call result.Count(), result.Any() or result.ToList() that's a separate query sent to the DB. Every LINQ method performed on a materialized collection is performed in memory. You can see examples of using FromSqlRaw here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/querying/raw-sql Each call has a .ToList at the end. – Simon Katanski Nov 23 '19 at 22:42
  • If you are unsure, when and what SQL query is generated enable EF console logging. There are some examples here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/ef6/fundamentals/… It might be slightly different with core. – Simon Katanski Nov 23 '19 at 22:45

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