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Hi I solved my problem by creating a generator function that generates successive integers that have a special property, in increasing order.

Assume this kind of template for my program:

from itertools import islice, count

def special_gen(d):
    for n in count(1):
        if is_special(d, n):
            yield n

if __name__ == '__main__':
    first= 10
    for d in range(5):
        print(f"The first {first} special({d}) numbers are:",
              list(islice(special_gen(d), first)))

It may take a long time to generate successive terms so I am looking into using sub-processes to speed things up.

I think the following scheme is the start of splitting the calculation - this uses four separate generators and merges their outputs so the results are in order, but, I am stuck in how best to add multiprocessing so that each of the generators are in separate processes.

PROCESSES = 4

def special_gen_mod(d, mod=1, offset=0):
    for n in count(1 + offset, mod):
        if is_special(d, n):
            yield n

def special_gen(d):
    sub_generators = [special_gen_mod(d, PROCESSES, off)
                      for off in range(PROCESSES)]
    yield from heapq.merge(*sub_generators)

Please assume that time-wise is_special(d, n} is proportional to log(n) and exp(d)

Your help would be appreciated, thanks. (Standard library solutions preferred).

EXTRA The actual task is the generation of super-d numbers on Rosetta Code where I have a single-tasking solution that struggles on the d=9 case.

1 Answer 1

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You can use multiprocessing in a generator in the same way you use it in any other part of your code. You can also combine it with yield from and get a reasonably elegant solution.

def superd(d, N=5000):
    # N is the number of digits to pre-compute in each cycle
    with Pool(cpu_count() - 2) as workers:
        for offset in count(0, N):
            worker_fn_args = zip(range(offset, offset + N), [d] * N)
            is_superd_batch = workers.starmap(is_special, worker_fn_args)
            yield from [n+offset for n in range(N) if is_superd_batch[n]]

The full code for your super-d example becomes:

from multiprocessing import Pool, cpu_count
from itertools import islice, count


def is_special(n, d):
    tofind = str(d) * d
    return tofind in str(d * n ** d)


def superd(d, N=5000):
    if d != int(d) or not 2 <= d <= 9:
        raise ValueError("argument must be integer from 2 to 9 inclusive")

    with Pool(cpu_count() - 2) as workers:
        for offset in count(0, N):
            worker_fn_args = zip(range(offset, offset + N), [d] * N)
            is_superd_batch = workers.starmap(is_special, worker_fn_args)
            yield from [n+offset for n in range(N) if is_superd_batch[n]]


if __name__ == '__main__':
    for d in range(2, 10):
        print(f"{d}:", ', '.join(str(n) for n in islice(superd(d), 10)))

and generates:

2: 19, 31, 69, 81, 105, 106, 107, 119, 127, 131
3: 261, 462, 471, 481, 558, 753, 1036, 1046, 1471, 1645
4: 1168, 4972, 7423, 7752, 8431, 10267, 11317, 11487, 11549, 11680
5: 4602, 5517, 7539, 12955, 14555, 20137, 20379, 26629, 32767, 35689
6: 27257, 272570, 302693, 323576, 364509, 502785, 513675, 537771, 676657, 678146
7: 140997, 490996, 1184321, 1259609, 1409970, 1783166, 1886654, 1977538, 2457756, 2714763
8: 185423, 641519, 1551728, 1854230, 6415190, 12043464, 12147605, 15517280, 16561735, 18542300
9: 17546133, 32613656, 93568867, 107225764, 109255734, 113315082, 121251742, 175461330, 180917907, 182557181

Runtime on my machine (Intel Xeon E3-1230 @3.3GHz) is (significantly) less than the time it took me to type up this answer.

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  • Thanks so much @FirefoxMetzger for your answer. Givn my initial problem of "return those integers from a count from 1... for which a function returns True"; you parallelise it by "Using successive batches of 5000 integers from 1, apply a pool of processes to first return the boolean result of applying the function to each integer, then returning those integers where the application was successful, then moving on to the next batch of 5000 integers". This works. but a part of my question is in stating what I thought should be a natural way to answer it, and noting that I could not do it.
    – Paddy3118
    Jul 5, 2020 at 21:29
  • My earlier comment may seem perverse, but prallel programming is hard, and I hoped that someone might strive for a (new?) method to solve it more as I stated and help make parallel programming easier in future. Thank you for your work. I have a workable "pattern" for future solutions.
    – Paddy3118
    Jul 5, 2020 at 21:34
  • @Paddy3118 you can yield from a count loop (updated the code) and map will do the batching.You could also use explicit processes and an explicit queue instead. You lose the convenience of Pool though, and your workers will hog the CPU. I would only do that if absolutely necessary. Jul 6, 2020 at 4:42

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