2

I'm trying to solve the HackerRank problem Big Sorting:

Problem Statement:

Consider an array of numeric strings where each string is a positive number with anywhere from 1 to 1000000 digits. Sort the array's elements in non-decreasing, or ascending order of their integer values and print each element of the sorted array on a new line.

Function Description

Complete the bigSorting function in the editor below. It should return the sorted string array.

bigSorting has the following parameter(s):

  • unsorted: an unsorted array of integers as strings

Input Format

The first line contains an integer N, denoting the number of strings in unsorted.

Each of the N subsequent lines contains an integer string unsorted[i].

Constraints

  • 1 <= N <= 200000
  • Each string is guaranteed to represent a positive integer without leading zeros.
  • The total number of digits across all strings in unsorted is between 1 and 1000000 (inclusive).

Output Format

Print each element of the sorted array on a new line.

My code:

n = int(raw_input())

unsorted = []

for _ in xrange(n):
    unsorted_item = raw_input()
    unsorted.append(unsorted_item)

result = sorted(unsorted)
print (result)

But it's giving a completely different result:

Input

6
31415926535897932384626433832795
1
3
10
3
5

Expected Output

1
3
3
5
10
31415926535897932384626433832795

Actual Output

1
10
3
3
31415926535897932384626433832795
5
  • 1
    You need to convert the strings to numbers otherwise you are sorting in alphabetical order. – Mark Meyer Nov 24 '19 at 0:14
  • @MarkMeyer You don't need to convert them to numbers, and it's faster not to; see my answer. – kaya3 Nov 24 '19 at 1:34
4

What you’re doing is not enough because you need to sort by text length - shorter strings come first - and in the lexicographical order if strings are of the same length. So, a simple solution could be this:

n = int(input())
unsorted = []
for _ in range(n):
    unsorted_item = input()
    unsorted.append(unsorted_item)

for element in sorted(unsorted, key=int):
    print(element)
| improve this answer | |
4

Anatolii's solution is certainly the simplest one, because these strings all represent numbers, and they should be sorted in numerical order.

Here's an alternative solution which doesn't require parsing the strings as ints: because they're all positive, then numbers with more digits are always larger, and numbers with equally many digits can be compared as strings. So, first we compare by string length, then strings of equal length are compared the way strings are usually compared.

We can use a tuple (len(s), s) as the comparison key; they are compared by their first component (string length), then by their second component (the string itself) as a tie-breaker.

result = sorted(unsorted, key=lambda s: (len(s), s))

This is a much more efficient solution on average, because parsing ints is slow, but comparing strings is usually fast because they usually differ within the first few digits. In the worst case, you have to compare every digit, but parsing as an int always requires looking at every digit.

I tried with lists of 1,000 strings representing numbers in the range 0 to 10^(10^4), i.e. numbers up to 10^4 digits long; the solution without int is over a hundred times faster:

>>> import random, timeit
>>> lst = [ str(random.randint(0, 10**10**4)) for i in range(1000) ]
>>> timeit.timeit(lambda: sorted(lst, key=lambda s: (len(s), s)), number=10)
0.01330024599974422
>>> timeit.timeit(lambda: sorted(lst, key=int), number=10)
4.78583431900006
| improve this answer | |
  • That's a nice idea. However, when I time string of a more reasonable length — say random.randint(0, 10**20) I find that the int sort performs much better. – Mark Meyer Nov 24 '19 at 2:00
  • OK, but the problem statement says that the strings can be up to 1000000 digits - i.e. up to 10**10**6, which is much larger than 10**10**4. – kaya3 Nov 24 '19 at 2:01
  • Oh, yes, I misread that to be 0 - 1000000. It's a nice solution. – Mark Meyer Nov 24 '19 at 2:02
  • 1
    You make a valid point though - this problem is artificial, and this solution should not be used in real code where you're comparing numeric strings that are probably much shorter. The reason int is faster for numbers up to 10**20 is presumably because the overhead of creating and comparing tuples is higher than the overhead of parsing a 20-digit number. Internally, since int objects know their own bit_length, comparisons will look at that first before comparing the actual bits of the number, which is conceptually the same as this solution does for strings. – kaya3 Nov 24 '19 at 2:07

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