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(Python) I would like to generate all possible combinations with length 9 out of a sorted list list with 150 numbers. However, that's not very efficient, so I want to have a condition where the difference between each of the selected numbers is 150 or less in order to only generate combinations, that I can use later on. How can I achieve this in Python? The input list is sorted and I need the output to be sorted as well.

I already tried the combinations function from itertools, but as I already mentioned, that's not efficient and would produce more than a billion possible combinations.

itertools.combinations(list, 9)

Thanks in advance#

I already found this solution, which was very good. However the output wasn't sorted which was my problem. import itertools import random

def combs(nums):
    result = set()
    for lower in nums:
        options = [n for n in nums if lower <= n <= lower + 150]
        result.update(itertools.combinations(options, 9))
    return result

print(combs([random.randrange(0, 5000) for _ in range(150)]))
  • just a note: 150 choose 9 is is actually a few dozen trillions possible combinations – Adam.Er8 Nov 24 at 14:51
  • Yeah i know, 150^9, exactly 38 443 359 375 000 000 000 – JaKalli123 Nov 24 at 14:53
  • 1
    Does your sorted data have repeated elements? E.g. [3, 4, 4, 5, 8, ...]. If so, should combination with equal numbers be skipped? – facehugger Nov 24 at 16:48
  • 1
    @facehugger No, every element is only once in the list. – JaKalli123 Nov 24 at 16:53
  • 1
    @JaKali - yes sorry I was unclear. I meant mathematically permutations are defined by their order as well as their contents whereas combinations have no intrinsic order; it just happens that they come out of itertools ordered. If you mean no more than 150 difference between adjacent elements when numerically ordered, that's clear enough. This constraint may reduce the number of combinations but it's not at all clear that it makes the process of finding the combinations any faster overall. – SimonN Nov 24 at 21:56
3

Here it is:

from itertools import combinations, islice, takewhile

def mad_combinations(data, comb_lenth, diff, create_comb=tuple):
    assert comb_lenth >= 2
    sorted_nums = sorted(frozenset(data))
    stop_index = len(sorted_nums) # or use None - what is faster?
    combination = [None]*comb_lenth # common memory

    def last_combinator(start_index, right_max_number):
        """Last combination place loop"""
        return takewhile(right_max_number.__ge__, islice(sorted_nums, start_index, stop_index))
        # In other words:
        # for x in islice(sorted_nums, start_index, stop_index):
        #     if x <= right_max_number:
        #         yield x
        #     else: return

    def _create_combinator(next_place_combinator, current_combination_place):
        # this namespace should store variables above
        def combinator(start_index, right_max_number):
            """Main loop"""
            for i, combination[current_combination_place] in \
                enumerate(
                    takewhile(
                        right_max_number.__ge__,
                        islice(sorted_nums, start_index, stop_index)),
                    start_index + 1):
                yield from ( # it yields last combination place number
                    next_place_combinator(i, combination[current_combination_place] + diff))

        return combinator

    for combination_place in range(comb_lenth-2, 0, -1): # create chain of loops
        last_combinator = _create_combinator(last_combinator, combination_place)

    last_index = comb_lenth - 1
    # First combination place loop:
    for j, combination[0] in enumerate(sorted_nums, 1):
        for combination[last_index] in last_combinator(j, combination[0] + diff):
            yield create_comb(combination) # don't miss to create a copy!!!

The function above is roughly equivalent to:

def example_of_comb_length_3(data, diff):
    sorted_nums = sorted(frozenset(data))
    for i1, n1 in enumerate(sorted_nums, 1):
        for i2, n2 in enumerate(sorted_nums[i1:], i1 + 1):
            if n2 - n1 > diff:break
            for n3 in sorted_nums[i2:]:
                if n3 - n2 > diff:break
                yield (n1, n2, n3)

Versions that use filter:

def insane_combinations(data, comb_lenth, diff):
    assert comb_lenth >= 2
    for comb in combinations(sorted(frozenset(data)), comb_lenth):
        for left, right in zip(comb, islice(comb, 1, comb_lenth)):
            if right - left > diff:
                break
        else:
            yield comb


def crazy_combinations(data, comb_lenth, diff):
    assert comb_lenth >= 2
    last_index = comb_lenth - 1
    last_index_m1 = last_index - 1
    last_rule = (lambda comb: comb[last_index] - comb[last_index_m1] <= diff)
    _create_rule = (lambda next_rule, left, right:
        (lambda comb: (comb[right] - comb[left] <= diff) and next_rule(comb)))
    for combination_place in range(last_index_m1, 0, -1): 
        last_rule = _create_rule(last_rule, combination_place - 1, combination_place)
    return filter(last_rule, combinations(sorted(frozenset(data)), comb_lenth))

Tests:

def test(fetch, expected, comb_length, diff):
    fetch = tuple(fetch)
    assert list(insane_combinations(fetch, comb_length, diff)) == \
           list(crazy_combinations(fetch, comb_length, diff)) == \
           list(mad_combinations(fetch, comb_length, diff)) == list(expected)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test([1,2,3,4,5,6],
         comb_length=3, diff=2,
         expected=[
            (1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 4), (1, 3, 4), (1, 3, 5), (2, 3, 4), (2, 3, 5), (2, 4, 5),
            (2, 4, 6), (3, 4, 5), (3, 4, 6), (3, 5, 6), (4, 5, 6)])

    test([1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13],
         comb_length=3, diff=3,
         expected=[
             (1, 2, 3), (8, 9, 10), (8, 9, 11), (8, 9, 12), (8, 10, 11), (8, 10, 12),
             (8, 10, 13), (8, 11, 12), (8, 11, 13), (9, 10, 11), (9, 10, 12), (9, 10, 13),
             (9, 11, 12), (9, 11, 13), (9, 12, 13), (10, 11, 12), (10, 11, 13), (10, 12, 13),
             (11, 12, 13)])

I did not bother much with edge cases!! And I've tested only these 2 fetches! If you will find my answer helpful, be sure to test all possible options and write about bugs found (many bugs, I think). To check your concrete fetch use mad_combinations(your_fetch, 9, 150).

  • First of all, thank you very much for your answer. However, this doesn't help me that much because it does still have to generate all possible combinations which is not really efficient. That was my problem and I'm searching for a way, where it only generates combinations which meet the condition. – JaKalli123 Nov 24 at 17:12
  • @JaKalli123 according to my benchmarks, this solution is quite efficient; for the sample input of 150 random numbers in the range 0-5000, there are about 17 million combinations meeting the condition, and this solution runs in a little under 16 seconds on my machine. The "generate all and filter" approach should take multiple years to finish running. – kaya3 Nov 25 at 2:14
2

Here's a solution using a recursive generator function: the function combinations_max_diff takes a list of numbers nums, a number of elements k, and a maximum difference max_diff.

The helper function does all of the work; it takes a partial combination comb, a number of remaining elements r, a minimum list index i for the next element to be chosen in the combination, and a max_next which controls the maximum size of that next element.

def combinations_max_diff(nums, k, max_diff):
    # input list must be sorted
    nums = sorted(nums)
    n = len(nums)

    def helper(comb, r, i, max_next):
        if r == 0:
            yield comb
        else:
            for ii in range(i, n - r + 1):
                v = nums[ii]
                if v > max_next: break
                comb_v = comb + (v,)
                yield from helper(comb_v, r - 1, ii + 1, v + max_diff)

    return helper((), k, 0, nums[-1])

Example usage:

>>> nums = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> for c in combinations_max_diff(nums, 3, 2):
...     print(c)
... 
(1, 2, 3)
(1, 2, 4)
(1, 3, 4)
(1, 3, 5)
(2, 3, 4)
(2, 3, 5)
(2, 4, 5)
(2, 4, 6)
(3, 4, 5)
(3, 4, 6)
(3, 5, 6)
(3, 5, 7)
(4, 5, 6)
(4, 5, 7)
(4, 6, 7)
(5, 6, 7)

The question asks about efficiency, so here's some idea about that:

>>> import random, timeit
>>> nums = sorted(random.randrange(0, 5000) for _ in range(150))
>>> len(list(combinations_max_diff(nums, 9, 150)))
16932905
>>> timeit.timeit(lambda: list(combinations_max_diff(nums, 9, 150)), number=1)
15.906288493999455

So, about 16 seconds to generate about 17 million combinations, or a little under one microsecond per combination on my machine.

  • as I understand, an input is sorted set of numbers. So probably it's better to test sorted(frozenset(random.randrange(0, 5000) for _ in range(150))) – facehugger Nov 25 at 0:10
  • sorted returns a list anyway, and filtering out duplicates just means the size won't necessarily be 150. The algorithm works perfectly well in case there are any duplicates. – kaya3 Nov 25 at 0:11
  • yes, but it makes measurements depend on length of fetch. I've just tried to compare your and my resuls, and it seams unfair because my algo throws duplications out explicitly - it is much cheating – facehugger Nov 25 at 0:24
  • I've read through your solution and it seems to be the same idea as mine, but you used a mutable list where I used tuple concatenation, and you used islice and takewhile where I've used range and break. I removed the frozenset from yours to do a fair comparison, and yours is about 5% faster than mine. I tried using a mutable list with mine but that actually made it about 20% slower; if you're sufficiently interested, you might want to check whether tuple concatenation could speed up your solution. – kaya3 Nov 25 at 0:38
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    For sure. My results are too broad - from (my18sec, yours 26sec) to (my 3.2 sec, yours 4.1 sec) – facehugger Nov 25 at 0:42

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