8

Suppose I have the following code:

from scipy import *
import multiprocessing as mp
num_cores = mp.cpu_count()
from joblib import Parallel, delayed
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def func(x,y):
    return y/x
def main(y, xmin,xmax, dx):
    x = arange(xmin,xmax,dx)
    output = Parallel(n_jobs=num_cores)(delayed(func)(i, y) for i in x)
    return x, asarray(output)
def demo():
    x,z = main(2.,1.,30.,.1)
    plt.plot(x,z, label='All values')
    plt.plot(x[z>.1],z[z>.1], label='desired range') ## This is better to do in main()
    plt.show()

demo()

I want to calculate output only until output > a given number (it can be assumed that elements of output decreases monotonically with increase of x) and then stop (NOT calculating for all values of x and then sorting, that's inefficient for my purpose). Is there any way to do that using Parallel, delayed or any other multiprocessing?

  • You can use numpy also. I have added few numbers. The selection [z>.1] in the demo function should be done in the main function to make the code more efficient. – user247534 Nov 28 at 5:04
  • I know it'd be messy but I'd create one list, pass it to the function and the function would append the result to that list. Then outside I would check whether the list contains a number higher than that and then terminate the threads somehow. Now that I think about this there are probably smarter methods to do this like Queues – Maxxik CZ Nov 28 at 6:30
1
+50

There was no output > a given number specified so I just made one up. after testing I had to reverse the condition for proper operation output < a given number.

I would use a pool, launch the processes with a callback function to check the stop condition, then terminate the pool when ready. but that would cause a race condition which would allow results to be omitted from running processes that were not allowed to finish. I think this method has minimal modification to your code and is very easy to read. The order of list is NOT guaranteed.

Pros: very little overhead
Cons: could have missing results.

Method 1)

from scipy import *
import multiprocessing

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


def stop_condition_callback(ret):
        output.append(ret)
        if ret < stop_condition:
            worker_pool.terminate()


def func(x, y, ):
    return y / x


def main(y, xmin, xmax, dx):
    x = arange(xmin, xmax, dx)
    print("Number of calculations: %d" % (len(x)))

    # add calculations to the pool
    for i in x:
        worker_pool.apply_async(func, (i, y,), callback=stop_condition_callback)

    # wait for the pool to finish/terminate
    worker_pool.close()
    worker_pool.join()

    print("Number of results: %d" % (len(output)))
    return x, asarray(output)


def demo():
    x, z_list = main(2., 1., 30., .1)
    plt.plot(z_list, label='desired range')
    plt.show()


output = []
stop_condition = 0.1

worker_pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
demo()

This method has more overhead but will allow processes which have started to finish. Method 2)

from scipy import *
import multiprocessing

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


def stop_condition_callback(ret):
    if ret is not None:
        if ret < stop_condition:
            worker_stop.value = 1
        else:
            output.append(ret)


def func(x, y, ):
    if worker_stop.value != 0:
        return None
    return y / x


def main(y, xmin, xmax, dx):
    x = arange(xmin, xmax, dx)
    print("Number of calculations: %d" % (len(x)))

    # add calculations to the pool
    for i in x:
        worker_pool.apply_async(func, (i, y,), callback=stop_condition_callback)

    # wait for the pool to finish/terminate
    worker_pool.close()
    worker_pool.join()

    print("Number of results: %d" % (len(output)))
    return x, asarray(output)


def demo():
    x, z_list = main(2., 1., 30., .1)
    plt.plot(z_list, label='desired range')
    plt.show()


output = []
worker_stop = multiprocessing.Value('i', 0)
stop_condition = 0.1

worker_pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
demo()

Method 3) Pros: No results will be left out
Cons: This steps way outside what you would normally do.

take Method 1 and add

def stopPoolButLetRunningTaskFinish(pool):
    # Pool() shutdown new task from being started, by emptying the query all worker processes draw from
    while pool._task_handler.is_alive() and pool._inqueue._reader.poll():
        pool._inqueue._reader.recv()
    # Send sentinels to all worker processes
    for a in range(len(pool._pool)):
            pool._inqueue.put(None)

Then change stop_condition_callback

def stop_condition_callback(ret):
    if ret[1] < stop_condition:
        #worker_pool.terminate()
        stopPoolButLetRunningTaskFinish(worker_pool)
    else:
        output.append(ret)
0

I would use Dask to execute in parallel, and specifically the futures interface for realtime feedback of the results as they are completed. When done, you could either cancel the remaining futures in flight, lease the unneeded ones to finish asynchronously or close down the cluster.

from dask.distributed import Client, as_completed
client = Client()  # defaults to ncores workers, one thread each
y, xmin, xmax, dx = 2.,1.,30.,.1

def func(x, y):
    return x, y/x
x = arange(xmin,xmax,dx)
outx = []
output = []
futs = [client.submit(func, val, y) for val in x]
for future in as_completed(futs):
    outs = future.result()
    outx.append(outs[0])
    output.append(outs[1])
    if outs[1] < 0.1:
        break

Notes: - I assume you meant "less than", because otherwise the first value already passes (y / xmin > 0.1) - the outputs are not guaranteed to be in the order you input them if you want to fetch results as they become ready, but with such a fast calculation, perhaps they always are (this is why I had the func return the input value too) - if you stop computing, the output will be shorter than the full set of inputs, so I'm not quite sure what you want to print.

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