5

I'm trying to go into some deep of stack allocation, so I intended to obtain a stack configuration like this:

0x000009 -> 0,
0x000005 -> 1,
0x000001 -> 2,
...

here is the code:

int main(){

    int i;
    int j;
    int pseudoarray;

    printf("address of i \t\t%p\n",&i);
    printf("address of j \t\t%p\n",&j);
    printf("address of pseudoarray \t%p\n\n",&pseudoarray);

    for(i =0;i<10;i++){

        *((&pseudoarray)-i)=i;
        printf("Written at \t%p value \t%d\n\n",(&pseudoarray)-i, i);

        for(j =0; j<10;j++){
            printf("Read at \t%p value \t%d\n",(&pseudoarray-j), *((&pseudoarray-j)));
        }
        printf("\n\n\n");
    }

    printf("\n%d times done",i);

    return 0;
}

However it writes only up to the third cell, and then nothing is written.

Here is what it prints (printings from 6^th operation of writing to 10 is the same as 5):

C:\Users\Halib\OneDrive\Documents\Corsi\Corso C>plain.exe
address of i            0061FF1C
address of j            0061FF18
address of pseudoarray  0061FF14

Written at      0061FF14 value  0

Read at         0061FF14 value  0         <-- wrote a 0 here
Read at         0061FF10 value  4200912
Read at         0061FF0C value  4201019
Read at         0061FF08 value  4201019
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263



Written at      0061FF10 value  1

Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1         <-- wrote a 1 here
Read at         0061FF0C value  4201019
Read at         0061FF08 value  4201019
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263



Written at      0061FF0C value  2

Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1
Read at         0061FF0C value  2
Read at         0061FF08 value  2
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263



Written at      0061FF08 value  3

Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1
Read at         0061FF0C value  2
Read at         0061FF08 value  2          <-- I expected 3 here
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263



Written at      0061FF04 value  4

Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1
Read at         0061FF0C value  2
Read at         0061FF08 value  2
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280    <-- expected 4 here
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263



Written at      0061FF00 value  5

Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1
Read at         0061FF0C value  2
Read at         0061FF08 value  2
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214946
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199673
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  157728263

EDIT:

code modified: attempt:

int i;
int j;
int pseudoarray;

printf("address of i \t\t%p\n",&i);
printf("address of j \t\t%p\n",&j);
printf("address of pseudoarray \t%p\n\n",&pseudoarray);


for(i =0;i<10;i++){

    *((&pseudoarray)+i)=i;
}

    printf("\n\n");

for(j =0; j<10;j++){
        printf("Read at \t%p value \t%d\n",(&pseudoarray+j), *((&pseudoarray+j)));
    }

return 0;

produced following output:

address of i            0061FF1C
address of j            0061FF18
address of pseudoarray  0061FF14



Read at         0061FF14 value  0
Read at         0061FF10 value  1
Read at         0061FF0C value  2
Read at         0061FF08 value  2
Read at         0061FF04 value  6422280
Read at         0061FF00 value  4214921
Read at         0061FEFC value  4199645
Read at         0061FEF8 value  6422312
Read at         0061FEF4 value  -2
Read at         0061FEF0 value  -498040528

Could someone help me out? Thanks a lot.

18
  • 4
    You explicitly attempt to exploit undefined behavior and expect everything to work flawlessly? Unless you have very good knowledge about the stack layout generated by your specific compiler (it differs between different compilers, and could even differ between versions of the same compiler) it's like poking at a hornets nest while blindfolded and hoping that you miss the nest. Nov 25, 2019 at 14:07
  • 2
    @Someprogrammerdude It's probably not clobbering the return address from main as stacks normally grow downwards.
    – Ian Abbott
    Nov 25, 2019 at 14:29
  • 1
    @AlbertoTiraboschi If you really want to see what it is doing, you'll need to look at (or debug) the generated code at the assembly language level.
    – Ian Abbott
    Nov 25, 2019 at 14:32
  • 1
    obviously you have the same problem in your edit, since you are still calling those printf
    – sephiroth
    Nov 25, 2019 at 14:48
  • 1
    Because the processor doesn't know about that. The stack pointer here is updated when main() is called, and it reserves 12 bytes for the variables i, j and pseudoarray. When you push more stuff on the stack (i.e. when you call a function), it gets placed right after that. Assigning values to arbitrary memory like *((&pseudoarray)+i) does NOT update the stack pointer; also, it may or may not cause segmentation fault.
    – sephiroth
    Nov 25, 2019 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

7

The writing hasn't stopped working, but your way of printing the values is corrupting them. Assume that your stack pointer is normally at 0061FF08. When you go to call printf() in your inner loop, it is going to emit code that looks something like:

...
      push  %r0   / assume it computed *(&pseudoarray-j) int r0
      push  %r1   /  assume it computed &pseudoarray-1 into r1
      push  %r3   /  fmt string
      call  printf
      add   $12, %sp
 ....

So, this just over-wrote some of your pseudoarray[-j] entries, because almost universally stacks grow down. It is complicated by ABIs preferring certain stack alignments, so you can get away with it for a few words, but once you escape that you are done.

If you want to cause some real chaos, don't subtract from pseudoarray, add to it, so you will over-write bits of the calling frame for the function you are in. Incidentally, this is how buffer overflows & similar mechanisms hijack programs. ps: When a compiler allocates stack space to a program, it typically issues a sequence like this near the top:

func:
    push  %frame     / save the frame pointer register
    mov   %sp, %frame  / save the stack end pointer.
    sub   $num, %sp    / this allocates space for local vars.

and to return:

mov  %frame, %sp
pop  %frame
ret

so during the code generation part of the function, it is free to emit sequences like:

push   %r0
call   tolower
add    $4, %sp

which modify the stack, and permit tolower to construct its own stack frame. Stack memory below the current stack pointer may be temporarily usable, but it is difficult to synchronize this with the compiler. If you wanted to experiment with it:

void play() {
   int    save[10];
   int    i;
   int    temp;
   for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
         (&temp)[-i] = 1 << i;
   }
   for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
          save[i] = (&temp)[-i];
   }
   for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
          printf("%d vs %d\n", save[i], (&temp)[-i]);
   }
}

Notes:

  1. This isn't really C. The #UB people will flash the evil eye and spout gibberish when they see this.
  2. To the degree that this will not generate consistent results, and is a bad way to program, they are right.
  3. This is discovery, which is a valid use of compiler.
  4. You may have to carefully tune your compiler options with incantations like -O0, -std=c90, to get it to behave itself.
4
  • So what is the correct way to read the stack here after writing it? Nov 25, 2019 at 14:57
  • It's not clear to me why %ro, %r1, format string are not 'appended' right below the last element written on the stack. Could you please elaborate a bit more? Nov 25, 2019 at 15:07
  • Because referencing those areas may cause memory to appear there, but the allocation of the stack is controlled by the value of the stack pointer register. Unless you change that, you are just using unassigned stack memory. I will update the answer after a meeting....
    – mevets
    Nov 25, 2019 at 15:26
  • @AlbertoTiraboschi - You are modifying that memory by writing the 1 or 2 or 3 or whatever, but then when you call printf(), it walks on top of your modifications. You have no reason to expect that changes to memory you don't own should be left untouched. Nov 25, 2019 at 15:36
1

I think the OP understands the stack well enough to access it, but not well enough to know how the rest of the system accesses it. The stack is very heavily used.

Let's look at the OP's stack memory before the call to printf:

0061FF1C variable i
0061FF18 variable j
0061FF14 variable pseudoarray   <-- YOUR MEMORY
0061FF10 pseudoarray[-1]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF0C pseudoarray[-2]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF08 pseudoarray[-3]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF04 pseudoarray[-4]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF00 pseudoarray[-5]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEFC pseudoarray[-6]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF8 pseudoarray[-7]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF4 pseudoarray[-8]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF0 pseudoarray[-9]        <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY

The values of pseudoarray[-x] are random, but not for long. This is the memory after the call to printf:

0061FF1C variable i
0061FF18 variable j
0061FF14 variable pseudoarray                   <-- YOUR MEMORY
0061FF10 value of i                             <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF0C value of pseudoarray[-i]               <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF08 address of string "Written at \t%p..." <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF04 subroutine return address              <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FF00 used by printf                         <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEFC used by printf                         <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF8 used by printf                         <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF4 used by printf                         <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY
0061FEF0 used by printf                         <-- NOT YOUR MEMORY

I might be wrong on the exact order that parameters are written, but the idea is that calling any function (generally) involves the stack, so whatever you're doing with pseudoarray[-n] is going to get overwritten every time even if you write it correctly.

You have no reason to believe that storing into memory you do not own will remain untouched.

Edit Summarizing from a comment from @sephiroth above, merely accessing memory below your stack allocation does not change the stack pointer to "reserve" the space.

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