49

So I have a python dictionary, call it d1, and a version of that dictionary at a later point in time, call it d2. I want to find all the changes between d1 and d2. In other words, everything that was added, removed or changed. The tricky bit is that the values can be ints, strings, lists, or dicts, so it needs to be recursive. This is what I have so far:

def dd(d1, d2, ctx=""):
    print "Changes in " + ctx
    for k in d1:
        if k not in d2:
            print k + " removed from d2"
    for k in d2:
        if k not in d1:
            print k + " added in d2"
            continue
        if d2[k] != d1[k]:
            if type(d2[k]) not in (dict, list):
                print k + " changed in d2 to " + str(d2[k])
            else:
                if type(d1[k]) != type(d2[k]):
                    print k + " changed to " + str(d2[k])
                    continue
                else:
                    if type(d2[k]) == dict:
                        dd(d1[k], d2[k], k)
                        continue
    print "Done with changes in " + ctx
    return

It works just fine unless the value is a list. I cant quite come up with an elegant way to deal with lists, without having a huge, slightly changed version of this function repeated after a if(type(d2) == list).

Any thoughts?

EDIT: This differs from this post because the keys can change

8
  • Example: list1 = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], list2 = [0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. What output do you expect? Commented May 5, 2011 at 20:38
  • If they were under the same key in 2 different dicts, I think: 1 removed; 8 added (under the same key). If they were under different keys, then they are different elements.
    – Alex
    Commented May 5, 2011 at 20:43
  • This can quickly get tricky. Does order matter? What if 8 is moved to the front: [8, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], does order count, or only presence/absence (a set)? Can the list contain a nested dictionary, which in turn contains a list, etc?
    – samplebias
    Commented May 5, 2011 at 20:49
  • Can you give an example of the output it fails on?
    – Nick ODell
    Commented May 5, 2011 at 20:49
  • @samplebias: Yup. Lists can contain dictionaries, which can contain.... its turtles all the way down. I dont really need tuples, but at this point, that doesnt help much
    – Alex
    Commented May 5, 2011 at 20:51

10 Answers 10

77

In case you want the difference recursively, I have written a package for python: https://github.com/seperman/deepdiff

Installation

Install from PyPi:

pip install deepdiff

Example usage

Importing

>>> from deepdiff import DeepDiff
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> from __future__ import print_function # In case running on Python 2

Same object returns empty

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = t1
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{}

Type of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:"2", 3:3}
>>> pprint(DeepDiff(t1, t2), indent=2)
{ 'type_changes': { 'root[2]': { 'newtype': <class 'str'>,
                                 'newvalue': '2',
                                 'oldtype': <class 'int'>,
                                 'oldvalue': 2}}}

Value of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3}
>>> pprint(DeepDiff(t1, t2), indent=2)
{'values_changed': {'root[2]': {'newvalue': 4, 'oldvalue': 2}}}

Item added and/or removed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:4}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 5:5, 6:6}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff)
{'dic_item_added': ['root[5]', 'root[6]'],
 'dic_item_removed': ['root[4]'],
 'values_changed': {'root[2]': {'newvalue': 4, 'oldvalue': 2}}}

String difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'values_changed': { 'root[2]': {'newvalue': 4, 'oldvalue': 2},
                      "root[4]['b']": { 'newvalue': 'world!',
                                        'oldvalue': 'world'}}}

String difference 2

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!\nGoodbye!\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'values_changed': { "root[4]['b']": { 'diff': '--- \n'
                                                '+++ \n'
                                                '@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@\n'
                                                '-world!\n'
                                                '-Goodbye!\n'
                                                '+world\n'
                                                ' 1\n'
                                                ' 2\n'
                                                ' End',
                                        'newvalue': 'world\n1\n2\nEnd',
                                        'oldvalue': 'world!\n'
                                                    'Goodbye!\n'
                                                    '1\n'
                                                    '2\n'
                                                    'End'}}}

>>> 
>>> print (ddiff['values_changed']["root[4]['b']"]["diff"])
--- 
+++ 
@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@
-world!
-Goodbye!
+world
 1
 2
 End

Type change

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n\n\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'type_changes': { "root[4]['b']": { 'newtype': <class 'str'>,
                                      'newvalue': 'world\n\n\nEnd',
                                      'oldtype': <class 'list'>,
                                      'oldvalue': [1, 2, 3]}}}

List difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3, 4]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{'iterable_item_removed': {"root[4]['b'][2]": 3, "root[4]['b'][3]": 4}}

List difference 2:

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 3, 2, 3]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'iterable_item_added': {"root[4]['b'][3]": 3},
  'values_changed': { "root[4]['b'][1]": {'newvalue': 3, 'oldvalue': 2},
                      "root[4]['b'][2]": {'newvalue': 2, 'oldvalue': 3}}}

List difference ignoring order or duplicates: (with the same dictionaries as above)

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 3, 2, 3]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2, ignore_order=True)
>>> print (ddiff)
{}

List that contains dictionary:

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:1, 2:2}]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:3}]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'dic_item_removed': ["root[4]['b'][2][2]"],
  'values_changed': {"root[4]['b'][2][1]": {'newvalue': 3, 'oldvalue': 1}}}

Sets:

>>> t1 = {1, 2, 8}
>>> t2 = {1, 2, 3, 5}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'set_item_added': ['root[3]', 'root[5]'], 'set_item_removed': ['root[8]']}

Named Tuples:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Point = namedtuple('Point', ['x', 'y'])
>>> t1 = Point(x=11, y=22)
>>> t2 = Point(x=11, y=23)
>>> pprint (DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'values_changed': {'root.y': {'newvalue': 23, 'oldvalue': 22}}}

Custom objects:

>>> class ClassA(object):
...     a = 1
...     def __init__(self, b):
...         self.b = b
... 
>>> t1 = ClassA(1)
>>> t2 = ClassA(2)
>>> 
>>> pprint(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'values_changed': {'root.b': {'newvalue': 2, 'oldvalue': 1}}}

Object attribute added:

>>> t2.c = "new attribute"
>>> pprint(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'attribute_added': ['root.c'],
 'values_changed': {'root.b': {'newvalue': 2, 'oldvalue': 1}}}
12
  • Thanks @LukasN.P.Egger
    – Seperman
    Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 1:07
  • @MohitC can you please open a ticket for it in github and write where is the syntax error?
    – Seperman
    Commented Jan 29, 2016 at 2:23
  • Its on the import line itself. File "/usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages/deepdiff/__init__.py", line 1, in <module> from .deepdiff import DeepDiff File "/usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages/deepdiff/deepdiff.py", line 213 self.__diff(t1, t2, parents_ids=frozenset({id(t1)})) I am using python 2.6.6
    – MohitC
    Commented Jan 29, 2016 at 11:29
  • @MohitC It is not python 2.6 compatible. (on the top of github repo it says what versions it is compatible with). Why are you using python 2.6?
    – Seperman
    Commented Jan 29, 2016 at 17:23
  • 1
    Absolute lifesaver, thank you!
    – Nahko
    Commented Nov 16, 2023 at 23:03
23

Here's an implementation inspired by Winston Ewert

def recursive_compare(d1, d2, level='root'):
    if isinstance(d1, dict) and isinstance(d2, dict):
        if d1.keys() != d2.keys():
            s1 = set(d1.keys())
            s2 = set(d2.keys())
            print('{:<20} + {} - {}'.format(level, s1-s2, s2-s1))
            common_keys = s1 & s2
        else:
            common_keys = set(d1.keys())

        for k in common_keys:
            recursive_compare(d1[k], d2[k], level='{}.{}'.format(level, k))

    elif isinstance(d1, list) and isinstance(d2, list):
        if len(d1) != len(d2):
            print('{:<20} len1={}; len2={}'.format(level, len(d1), len(d2)))
        common_len = min(len(d1), len(d2))

        for i in range(common_len):
            recursive_compare(d1[i], d2[i], level='{}[{}]'.format(level, i))

    else:
        if d1 != d2:
            print('{:<20} {} != {}'.format(level, d1, d2))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    d1={'a':[0,2,3,8], 'b':0, 'd':{'da':7, 'db':[99,88]}}
    d2={'a':[0,2,4], 'c':0, 'd':{'da':3, 'db':7}}

    recursive_compare(d1, d2)

will return:

root                 + {'b'} - {'c'}
root.a               len1=4; len2=3
root.a[2]            3 != 4
root.d.db            [99, 88] != 7
root.d.da            7 != 3
1
  • This would fail if values are lists of dictionaries with different order of elements, wouldn't it?
    – Konstantin
    Commented Aug 19, 2021 at 13:46
10

One option would be to convert any lists you run into as dictionaries with the index as a key. For example:

# add this function to the same module
def list_to_dict(l):
    return dict(zip(map(str, range(len(l))), l))

# add this code under the 'if type(d2[k]) == dict' block
                    elif type(d2[k]) == list:
                        dd(list_to_dict(d1[k]), list_to_dict(d2[k]), k)

Here is the output with the sample dictionaries you gave in comments:

>>> d1 = {"name":"Joe", "Pets":[{"name":"spot", "species":"dog"}]}
>>> d2 = {"name":"Joe", "Pets":[{"name":"spot", "species":"cat"}]}
>>> dd(d1, d2, "base")
Changes in base
Changes in Pets
Changes in 0
species changed in d2 to cat
Done with changes in 0
Done with changes in Pets
Done with changes in base

Note that this will compare index by index, so it will need some modification to work well for list items being added or removed.

8

Just a thought: You could try an object-oriented approach where you derive your own dictionary class that keeps track of any changes made to it (and reports them). Seems like this might have many advantages over trying to compare two dicts...one is noted at the end.

To show how that might be done, here's a reasonably complete and minimally tested sample implementation which should work with both Python 2 and 3:

import sys

_NUL = object()  # unique object

if sys.version_info[0] > 2:
    def iterkeys(d, **kw):
        return iter(d.keys(**kw))
else:
    def iterkeys(d, **kw):
        return d.iterkeys(**kw)


class TrackingDict(dict):
    """ Dict subclass which tracks all changes in a _changelist attribute. """
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(TrackingDict, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.clear_changelist()
        for key in sorted(iterkeys(self)):
            self._changelist.append(AddKey(key, self[key]))

    def clear_changelist(self):  # additional public method
        self._changelist = []

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        modtype = ChangeKey if key in self else AddKey
        super(TrackingDict, self).__setitem__(key, value)
        self._changelist.append(modtype(key, self[key]))

    def __delitem__(self, key):
        super(TrackingDict, self).__delitem__(key)
        self._changelist.append(RemoveKey(key))

    def clear(self):
        deletedkeys = self.keys()
        super(TrackingDict, self).clear()
        for key in sorted(deletedkeys):
            self._changelist.append(RemoveKey(key))

    def update(self, other=_NUL):
        if other is not _NUL:
            otherdict = dict(other)  # convert to dict if necessary
            changedkeys = set(k for k in otherdict if k in self)
            super(TrackingDict, self).update(other)
            for key in sorted(iterkeys(otherdict)):
                if key in changedkeys:
                    self._changelist.append(ChangeKey(key, otherdict[key]))
                else:
                    self._changelist.append(AddKey(key, otherdict[key]))

    def setdefault(self, key, default=None):
        if key not in self:
            self[key] = default  # will append an AddKey to _changelist
        return self[key]

    def pop(self, key, default=_NUL):
        if key in self:
            ret = self[key]  # save value
            self.__delitem__(key)
            return ret
        elif default is not _NUL:  # default specified
            return default
        else:  # not there & no default
            self[key]  # allow KeyError to be raised

    def popitem(self):
        key, value = super(TrackingDict, self).popitem()
        self._changelist.append(RemoveKey(key))
        return key, value

# change-tracking record classes

class DictMutator(object):
    def __init__(self, key, value=_NUL):
        self.key = key
        self.value = value
    def __repr__(self):
        return '%s(%r%s)' % (self.__class__.__name__, self.key,
                             '' if self.value is _NUL else ': '+repr(self.value))

class AddKey(DictMutator): pass
class ChangeKey(DictMutator): pass
class RemoveKey(DictMutator): pass

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import traceback
    import sys

    td = TrackingDict({'one': 1, 'two': 2})
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td['three'] = 3
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td['two'] = -2
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.clear()
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.clear_changelist()

    td['newkey'] = 42
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.setdefault('another') # default None value
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.setdefault('one more', 43)
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.update(zip(('another', 'one', 'two'), (17, 1, 2)))
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.pop('newkey')
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    try:
        td.pop("won't find")
    except KeyError:
        print("KeyError as expected:")
        traceback.print_exc(file=sys.stdout)
    print('...and no change to _changelist:')
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

    td.clear_changelist()
    while td:
        td.popitem()
    print('changelist: {}'.format(td._changelist))

Note that unlike a simple comparison of the before and after state of a dictionary, this class will tell you about keys which were added and then deleted—in other words, it keeps a complete history until its _changelist is cleared.

Output:

changelist: [AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2)]
changelist: [AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2), AddKey('three': 3)]
changelist: [AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2), AddKey('three': 3), ChangeKey('two': -2)]
changelist: [AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2), AddKey('three': 3), ChangeKey('two': -2), RemoveKey('one'), RemoveKey('three'), RemoveKey('two')]
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42)]
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42), AddKey('another': None)]
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42), AddKey('another': None), AddKey('one more': 43)]
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42), AddKey('another': None), AddKey('one more': 43), ChangeKey('another': 17), AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2)]
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42), AddKey('another': None), AddKey('one more': 43), ChangeKey('another': 17), AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2), RemoveKey('newkey')]
KeyError as expected:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "trackingdict.py", line 122, in <module>
    td.pop("won't find")
  File "trackingdict.py", line 67, in pop
    self[key]  # allow KeyError to be raised
KeyError: "won't find"
...and no change to _changelist:
changelist: [AddKey('newkey': 42), AddKey('another': None), AddKey('one more': 43), ChangeKey('another': 17), AddKey('one': 1), AddKey('two': 2), RemoveKey('newkey')]
changelist: [RemoveKey('one'), RemoveKey('two'), RemoveKey('another'), RemoveKey('one more')]
7

Your function should begin by checking the type of its arguments, write the function so that it can handle lists, dictionaries, ints, and strings. That way you don't have to duplicate anything, you just call recursively.

Psuedocode:

def compare(d1, d2):
     if d1 and d2 are dicts
            compare the keys, pass values to compare
     if d1 and d2 are lists
            compare the lists, pass values to compare
     if d1 and d2 are strings/ints
            compare them
7

As suggested by Serge I found this solution helpful to get a quick boolean return on whether two dictionaries match "all the way down":

import json

def match(d1, d2):
    return json.dumps(d1, sort_keys=True) == json.dumps(d2, sort_keys=True)
0
1

Consider using hasattr(obj, '__iter__') as you recurse through the object. If an object implements the __iter__ method you know you can iterate over it.

0

It is fun to do something yourselves to practice and learn, yet I find that for non-trivial tasks, the ready and maintained packages often work better.

Consider convert to json and use some decent "semantic" json comparator say https://www.npmjs.com/package/compare-json or online http://jsondiff.com. Would need stringify number key.

If you can try translate jsondiff to python if you really need.

Conversion from JavaScript to Python code?

0

You can try the following simple implementation

def recursive_compare(obj1, obj2):
""" Compare python objects recursively, support type:
"int, float, long, basestring, set, datetime, date, dict, Sequence"

Example:
>>> recursive_compare([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3])
>>> True
>>> recursive_compare([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 4])
>>> False
>>> recursive_compare({'a': 1}, {'a': 2})
>>> False
"""

def _diff(obj1, obj2):
    # exclude type basestring for backward-compatible python2:
    # <str, unicode>
    if type(obj1) != type(obj2) and not isinstance(obj1, basestring):
        return False

    elif isinstance(obj1,
                    (int, float, long, basestring, set, datetime, date)):
        if obj1 != obj2:
            return False

    elif isinstance(obj1, dict):
        keys = obj1.viewkeys() & obj2.viewkeys()
        if obj1 and len(keys) == 0 \
            or keys.difference(set(obj1.keys())) \
                or keys.difference(set(obj2.keys())):
            return False

        for k in keys:
            if _diff(obj1[k], obj2[k]) is False:
                return False

    elif isinstance(obj1, collections.Sequence):
        # require sorted sequence object
        if len(obj1) != len(obj2):
            return False

        for i in range(len(obj1)):
            if _diff(obj1[i], obj2[i]) is False:
                return False

    else:
        raise TypeError('do not support type {} to compare'.format(
            type(obj1)))

return False if _diff(obj1, obj2) is False else True
0

Here's a sample, which can be easily extended to handle other python data types too:

def deep_compare(a, b) -> bool:
    if type(a) is not type(b): return False

    if type(a) is dict:
        if not deep_compare(list(a.keys()), list(b.keys())): return False
        if not deep_compare(list(a.values()), list(b.values())): return False
    elif isinstance(a, (list, tuple, set)):
        for a_i, b_i in zip(a, b):
            if not deep_compare(a_i, b_i): return False
    else:  # scalar, bool, str
        if a != b: return False

    return True

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.