37

In C# I can do actually this:

//This is C#
static T SomeMethod<T>() where T:new()
{
  Console.WriteLine("Typeof T: "+typeof(T));
  return new T();
}

//And call the method here
SomeMethod<SomeClassName>();

But for some reason I can't get it to work in Java.

The thing I want to do is, to create a static method on a superclass, so the subclasses can be converted to XML.

//This is Java, but doesn't work
public static T fromXml<T>(String xml) {
  try {
    JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(T.class);
    Unmarshaller um = context.createUnmarshaller();
    return (T)um.unmarshal(new StringReader(xml));
  } catch (JAXBException je) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Error interpreting XML response", je);
  }
}

//Also the call doesn't work...
fromXml<SomeSubObject>("<xml/>");

5 Answers 5

54
public static <T> T fromXml(Class<T> clazz, String xml) {

Called as:

Thing thing = fromXml(Thing.class, xml);

or more explicitly:

Thing thing = MyClass.<Thing>fromXml(Thing.class, xml);

To be even more confusing you can have constructors that both construct a generic type and have a generic parameter themselves. Can't remember the syntax and have never seen it used in anger (you are probably better off with a static creation method anyway).

The cast (T) is unsafe, and you can't write T.class. So include the T.class as an argument (as JAXBContext.newInstance does) and throw a relevant exception if the type is wrong.

public static <T> T fromXml(Class<T> clazz, String xml) {
    try {
        JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);
        Unmarshaller um = context.createUnmarshaller();
        Object obj = um.unmarshal(new StringReader(xml));
        try {
            return clazz.cast(obj);
        } catch (ClassCastException exc) {
             throw new RelevantException(
                 "Expected class "+clazz+
                  " but was "+obj.getClass()
             );
        }
    } catch (JAXBException exc) {
        throw new RelevantException(
            "Error unmarshalling XML response",
            exc
         );
    }
}

I believe the next version of JAXB (in 6u14?) has some convenience methods for this sort of thing in the JAXB class.

5
  • 2
    won't even compile... You cannot write T.class
    – pgras
    Feb 26, 2009 at 12:56
  • 2
    I didn't mean write T.class in the method. I said as an argumnet. And the calling function may no (or may have it passed as an argumnet). Feb 26, 2009 at 13:00
  • The newInstance(T.class) was a copy & paste which I didn't see. Still the question seems to be about how to write a generic method. Feb 26, 2009 at 13:04
  • Please rewrite JAXBContext.newInstance(T.class) to JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz) so I can accept it.
    – doekman
    Feb 26, 2009 at 13:52
  • 1
    Take a look at this post. Works on java 7
    – Nereis
    Aug 13, 2015 at 6:12
7

Methods like Java's Collections.emptySet() have a signature like this:

public static final <T> Set<T> emptySet()

And are called like this:

Set<Foo> foos = Collections.<Foo>emptySet();

Mockito's anyObject() method is another example. I personally don't find either syntax to be very awesome. Passing the type in as a method argument works but always felt kludgy. Providing the parameter in the way that emptySet() does seems cleaner but it's not always apparent that a method allows a type to be specified.

5

In Java, generics are compile-time only data, which are lost at run time. So, if you called a method like that, the JVM would have no way of knowing what T.class was. The normal way to get around this is to pass a class instance object as a parameter to the method, like this:

public static <T> T fromXml(Class<T> clazz, String xml) {
  try {
    JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(clazz);
    Unmarshaller um = context.createUnmarshaller();
    return (T)um.unmarshal(new StringReader(xml));
  } catch (JAXBException je) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Error interpreting XML response", je);
  }
}

fromXml(SomeSubObject.class, "<xml/>");
3
  • Still not the way to write a generic method. Feb 26, 2009 at 13:04
  • Almost. The <T> needs to be right after the "static", not "fromXml" I think.
    – doekman
    Feb 26, 2009 at 13:48
  • Not ideally, no. But if he is going to need access to the type information at run time (to call JAXBContext.newInstance()), he will need an object of that class, or the class object.
    – Avi
    Feb 26, 2009 at 13:48
1

I am afraid what you are trying to do will simply not work in Java. Not being able to create new instances of generic types is one of those "must have" features that .NET provided while Java is simply missing. This leads to "workarounds" like those suggested earlier. Check out the ArrayList.toArray(T) as a reference how this can be done: essentially you will have to pass a reference to an object that you are trying to create so that you know what class to instantiate at runtime. This is the code from ArrayList.toArray(T):


public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a)
{
   if (a.length < size)
   {
      a = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.
         newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), size);
   }
   System.arraycopy(elementData, 0, a, 0, size);
   if (a.length > size)
   {
      a[size] = null;
   }
   return a;
}

1

The current answer is safer but is technically outdated because in java7 and beyond you don't need the "Class clazz" argument. The type is inferred from the expected return type. You just get a warning about unsafe cast.

public class Main {

    private static class Dog {
        public String toString() { return "dog"; }
    }

    private static class Cat {
        public String toString() { return "cat"; }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Cat cat = parse("cat");
        Dog dog = parse("dog");
        System.out.println("the cat object is a " + cat);
        System.out.println("the dog object is a " + dog);
    }

    private static Object untypedParse(String stringToParse) {
        if(stringToParse.equals("dog")) {
            return new Dog();
        } else if(stringToParse.equals("cat")) {
            return new Cat();
        } else {
            throw new RuntimeException("not expected");
        }
    }

    public static <T> T parse(String stringToParse) {
        return (T)untypedParse(stringToParse);
    }

}


~/test/generics$ javac Main.java
Note: Main.java uses unchecked or unsafe operations.
Note: Recompile with -Xlint:unchecked for details.
~/test/generics$ java Main
the cat object is a cat
the dog object is a dog
3
  • 1
    I have to admit, I don't like the idea of getting unsafe cast warnings, it gives people the wrong idea. Especially picky people who nitpick every tiny issue. Mar 28, 2023 at 14:57
  • 1
    You're either working on a project with 0 warnings or too many to count that your IDE gives up counting them. If you're in the latter, this solution is for you!
    – joseph
    Mar 28, 2023 at 16:54
  • 1
    This is a highly relatable answer :D well done! you win! haha Mar 28, 2023 at 22:35

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