37

I'm refactoring my libraries to use Span<T> for avoiding heap allocations if possible but as I target also older frameworks I'm implementing some general fallback solutions as well. But now I found a weird issue and I'm not quite sure whether I found a bug in .NET Core 3 or am I doing something illegal.

The issue:

// This returns 1 as expected but cannot be used in older frameworks:
private static uint ReinterpretNew()
{
    Span<byte> bytes = stackalloc byte[4];
    bytes[0] = 1; // FillBytes(bytes);

    // returning bytes as uint:
    return Unsafe.As<byte, uint>(ref bytes.GetPinnableReference());
}

// This returns garbage in .NET Core 3.0 with release build:
private static unsafe uint ReinterpretOld()
{
    byte* bytes = stackalloc byte[4];
    bytes[0] = 1; // FillBytes(bytes);

    // returning bytes as uint:
    return *(uint*)bytes;
}

Interestingly enough, ReinterpretOld works well in .NET Framework and in .NET Core 2.0 (so I could be happy with it after all), still, it bothers me a bit.

Btw. ReinterpretOld can be fixed also in .NET Core 3.0 by a small modification:

//return *(uint*)bytes;
uint* asUint = (uint*)bytes;
return *asUint;

My Question:

Is this a bug or does ReinterpretOld work in older frameworks only by accident and should I apply the fix also for them?

Remarks:

  • The debug build works also in .NET Core 3.0
  • I tried to apply [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] to ReinterpretOld but it had no effect.
  • 2
    FYI: return Unsafe.As<byte, uint>(ref bytes[0]); or return MemoryMarshal.Cast<byte, uint>(bytes)[0]; - no need to use GetPinnableReference(); looking into the other bit, though – Marc Gravell Nov 26 at 13:18
  • SharpLab in case it helps anyone else. The two versions which avoid Span<T> do compile to different IL. I don't think you're doing anything invalid: I suspect a JIT bug. – canton7 Nov 26 at 13:23
  • what is the garbage that you are seeing? are you using the hack to disable locals-init? this hack significantly impacts stackalloc (i.e. it doesn't wipe the space allocated) – Marc Gravell Nov 26 at 13:23
  • @canton7 if they compile to the same IL, we can't infer it is a JIT bug... if the IL is the same, etc... sounds more like a compiler bug, if anything, perhaps with an older compiler? György : can you indicate exactly how you're compiling this? what SDK, for example? I cannot repro the garbage – Marc Gravell Nov 26 at 13:25
  • 1
    It looks like stackalloc doesn't always zero, actually: link – canton7 Nov 26 at 13:30
33

Ooh, this is a fun find; what is happening here is that your local is getting optimized away - there are no locals remaining, which means that there is no .locals init, which means that stackalloc behaves differently, and does not wipe the space;

private static unsafe uint Reinterpret1()
{
    byte* bytes = stackalloc byte[4];
    bytes[0] = 1;

    return *(uint*)bytes;
}

private static unsafe uint Reinterpret2()
{
    byte* bytes = stackalloc byte[4];
    bytes[0] = 1;

    uint* asUint = (uint*)bytes;
    return *asUint;
}

becomes:

.method private hidebysig static uint32 Reinterpret1() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldc.i4.4 
    L_0001: conv.u 
    L_0002: localloc 
    L_0004: dup 
    L_0005: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0006: stind.i1 
    L_0007: ldind.u4 
    L_0008: ret 
}

.method private hidebysig static uint32 Reinterpret2() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 3
    .locals init (
        [0] uint32* numPtr)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.4 
    L_0001: conv.u 
    L_0002: localloc 
    L_0004: dup 
    L_0005: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0006: stind.i1 
    L_0007: stloc.0 
    L_0008: ldloc.0 
    L_0009: ldind.u4 
    L_000a: ret 
}

I think I'd be happy to say that this is a compiler bug, or at least: an undesirable side-effect and behavior given that previous decisions have been put in place to say "emit the .locals init", specifically to try and keep stackalloc sane - but whether the compiler folks agree is up to them.

The workaround is: treat the stackalloc space as undefined (which, to be fair, is what you're meant to do); if you expect it to be zeros: manually zero it.

  • 2
    It seems there is an open ticket for this. I'm going to add a new comment to that. – György Kőszeg Nov 26 at 14:02
  • Huh, all my work and I didn't notice the first was missing locals init. Nice one. – canton7 Nov 26 at 14:32
  • 1
    @canton7 if you're anything like me, you automatically skip past .maxstack and .locals, making it especially easy to not notice that that it is/isn't there :) – Marc Gravell Nov 26 at 14:36
  • 1
    The content of the newly allocated memory is undefined. according to MSDN. The specification doesn't say that the memory should be zeroed either. So it looks like it only works on old framework by accident, or as a result of a non-contractual behaviour. – Luaan Nov 27 at 8:14

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