161

I have a list of float values and I want to print them with cout with 2 decimal places.

For example:

10.900  should be printed as 10.90
1.000 should be printed as 1.00
122.345 should be printed as 122.34

How can I do this?

( setprecision doesn't seem to help in this.)

13 Answers 13

251

With <iomanip>, you can use std::fixed and std::setprecision

Here is an example

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main()
{
    double d = 122.345;

    std::cout << std::fixed;
    std::cout << std::setprecision(2);
    std::cout << d;
}

And you will get output

122.34
6
  • 14
    why do you used "std:fixed" in program? – Vilas Joshi Jun 5 '18 at 16:59
  • 2
    A useful header can be defined for this: #define FIXED_FLOAT(x) std::fixed <<std::setprecision(2)<<(x) which simplifies the usage to: cout<<FIXED_FLOAT(d) – Udayraj Deshmukh Aug 25 '18 at 2:03
  • 22
    @VilasJoshi, setprecision set the number of digits after the decimal, if there are 5 digits and we use setprecision(2) we will get 2 digits , but if there are 0 digits it will show none, using fixed we fix that much digits have to be shown so 5 will be represented as 5.00 no 5 – vaibnak Oct 18 '18 at 13:33
  • 2
    @vaibnak That's misleading to the point of wrong. setprecision sets "the number of digits", which depending on the state that std::fixed sets is either "significant digits", "digits after the decimal place" or "digits after the hexadecimal place" – Caleth Apr 6 at 16:00
  • Thanks for the heads up Caleth. Note for other people that "n place after decimal point" is indeed using setprecision in fixed – RexYuan Apr 7 at 18:17
48

You were nearly there, need to use std::fixed as well, refer http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/manipulators/fixed/

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    float testme[] = { 0.12345, 1.2345, 12.345, 123.45, 1234.5, 12345 };

    std::cout << std::setprecision(2) << std::fixed;

    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << testme[i] << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

outputs:

0.12
1.23
12.35
123.45
1234.50
12345.00
0
21

setprecision(n) applies to the entire number, not the fractional part. You need to use the fixed-point format to make it apply to the fractional part: setiosflags(ios::fixed)

16

Simplify the accepted answer

Simplified example:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main()
{
    double d = 122.345;
    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(2) << d;
}

And you will get output

122.34

Reference:

1
  • This worked for me: std::cout << std::setprecision(2) << std::fixed << d; – Andrea Girardi Jun 7 '18 at 14:22
11

I had an issue for integers while wanting consistent formatting.

A rewrite for completeness:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    //    floating point formatting example
    cout << fixed << setprecision(2) << 122.345 << endl;
    //    Output:  122.34

    //    integer formatting example
    cout << fixed << setprecision(2) << double(122) << endl;
    //    Output:  122.00
}
2
  • 1
    You're missing std:: right before cout and endl since you're not using the namespace. – blackforest-tom Oct 8 '19 at 11:03
  • Thanks. Added headers & using namespace std. – Manohar Reddy Poreddy Jan 22 at 1:53
4
#include<stdio.h>
int main()

{

 double d=15.6464545347;

printf("%0.2lf",d);

}
0
3

I had this similar problem in a coding competition and this is how I handled it. Setting a precision of 2 to all double values

First adding the header to use setprecision

#include <iomanip>

Then adding the following code in our main

  double answer=5.9999;
  double answer2=5.0000;
  cout<<setprecision(2)<<fixed;
  cout <<answer << endl;
  cout <<answer2 << endl;

Output:

5.99
5.00

You need to use fixed for writing 5.00 thats why,your output won't come for 5.00.

A short reference video link I'm adding which is helpful

0
2

You have to set the 'float mode' to fixed.

float num = 15.839;

// this will output 15.84
std::cout << std::fixed << "num = " << std::setprecision(2) << num << std::endl;
0
2

To set fixed 2 digits after the decimal point use these first:

cout.setf(ios::fixed);
cout.setf(ios::showpoint);
cout.precision(2);

Then print your double values.

This is an example:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::ios;
using std::endl;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    cout.setf(ios::fixed);
    cout.setf(ios::showpoint);
    cout.precision(2);
    double d = 10.90;
    cout << d << endl;
    return 0;
}
0

with templates

#include <iostream>

// d = decimal places
template<int d> 
std::ostream& fixed(std::ostream& os){
    os.setf(std::ios_base::fixed, std::ios_base::floatfield); 
    os.precision(d); 
    return os; 
}

int main(){
    double d = 122.345;
    std::cout << fixed<2> << d;
}

similar for scientific as well, with a width option also (useful for columns)

// d = decimal places
template<int d> 
std::ostream& f(std::ostream &os){
    os.setf(std::ios_base::fixed, std::ios_base::floatfield); 
    os.precision(d); 
    return os; 
}

// w = width, d = decimal places
template<int w, int d> 
std::ostream& f(std::ostream &os){
    os.setf(std::ios_base::fixed, std::ios_base::floatfield); 
    os.precision(d); 
    os.width(w);
    return os; 
}

// d = decimal places
template<int d> 
std::ostream& e(std::ostream &os){
    os.setf(std::ios_base::scientific, std::ios_base::floatfield); 
    os.precision(d); 
    return os; 
}

// w = width, d = decimal places
template<int w, int d> 
std::ostream& e(std::ostream &os){
    os.setf(std::ios_base::scientific, std::ios_base::floatfield); 
    os.precision(d); 
    os.width(w);
    return os; 
}

int main(){
    double d = 122.345;
    std::cout << f<10,2> << d << '\n'
        << e<10,2> << d << '\n';
}
0
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    int a;
    long int b;
    char c;
    float d;
    double e;
    cin>>a>>b>>c>>d>>e;
    cout<<a<<"\n"<<b<<"\n"<<c<<"\n";
    cout<<fixed<<setprecision(3)<<d<<"\n";
    cout<<fixed<<setprecision(9)<<e;
    return 0;
}

Simple code would help you surely!

-3

Just a minor point; put the following in the header

using namespace std;

then

std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(2) << d;

becomes simplified to

cout << fixed << setprecision(2) << d;

1
  • 2
    Yes, it does become "simplified", but this is strongly discouraged. Please do not use using namespace std; for the sake of it - understand why you are doing so. – Carlos F Nov 1 '19 at 12:22
-6

this an example using a matrix.

cout<<setprecision(4)<<fixed<<m[i][j]

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