22

I would like to catch all variants of a generic exception class and I was wondering if there is a way to do it without multiple catch blocks. For example say I have an exception class:

public class MyException<T> : Exception
{
    public string MyProperty { get; }

    public MyException(T prop) : base(prop.ToString())
    {
        MyProperty = prop?.ToString();
    }
}

and two derived classes:

public class MyDerivedStringException : MyException<string>
{
    public MyDerivedStringException(string prop) : base(prop)
    {

    }
}

public class MyDerivedIntException : MyException<int>
{
    public MyDerivedIntException(int prop) : base(prop)
    {

    }
}

is there a way of catching both MyDerivedStringException and MyDerivedIntException in one catch block.

I have tried this:

try
{
   ...
}

catch(Exception e) when (e is MyDerivedStringException || e is MyDerivedIntException)
{
}

but it is not very clean and means I do not have access to MyProperty.

I am interested in a general solution to the problem but in my case the generic Exception is defined in a third party library which as pointed out below adds some additional constraints to the problem.

15

Make MyException<T> implement an interface and check for an exception by the interface type.

Interface:

public interface IMyException
{
    string MyProperty { get; }
}

Generic class implementing the interface:

public class MyException<T> : Exception, IMyException
{
    public string MyProperty { get; }

    public MyException(T prop)
    {
        MyProperty = prop?.ToString();
    }
}

Derived classes:

public class MyDerivedStringException : MyException<string>
{
    public MyDerivedStringException(string prop) : base(prop)
    {

    }
}

public class MyDerivedIntException : MyException<int>
{
    public MyDerivedIntException(int prop) : base(prop)
    {

    }
}

Usage:

try
{
    // ...
}
catch (Exception e) when (e is IMyException)
{
    // ...
}

The same can be done by creating a base class that inherits from Exception and than making MyException<T> derive from that base class.

  • 3
    I'm not sure that it's worth an interface here - just a non-generic base class between Exception and MyException<T> would be fine. – Jon Skeet Nov 27 '19 at 16:17
  • Also, OP still doesn't have access to the generic property (without using reflection) which I guess is the real issue. – DavidG Nov 27 '19 at 16:19
10

The test if your Type is derived from a generic is:

Type = typeof(something);
t.GetGenericTypeDefinition()==typeof(MyException<>);

But this is true only for derived types itself, like MyException<int> or MyException<string>.

If you have further derivatives like MyDerivedStringException you had to test on:

ex.GetType.BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition()==typeof(MyException<>);

So this works for any existing generic, but you need to know the level of inheritance for this test, or loop through all the base types.

So you could do this:

catch(Exception ex) when (ex.GetType.BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition()==typeof(MyException<>))
3

This implementation boxes and unboxes if T:Value is Valuetype... but with respect to utilization you can control performance implications with the number of times you attempt to box/unbox.

public class MyException<T> : MyException
{
    public T Prop => (T)base.Prop;

    public MyException(T prop) : base(prop)
    {

    }
}

public class MyException : Exception
{
    protected object Prop { get; }

    public MyException(object prop)
    {
         Prop = prop;
    }
}

Logic

try {
     ...
} catch(MyException e) {
    ...
}
  • This is a good answer and I've upvoted - unfortunately it doesn't solve my specific issue as the generic exception is in a third party library so I can't edit it. – SBFrancies Nov 27 '19 at 16:18
2

Unfortunatelly, you can't catch with the

catch(MyException ex) class, as it expects a type.

Your best bet would be to create a base class or interface, catch it and get the type from there.

There is already an answer on so here on how to get the type and do this.

1

this implementation abstracts the handling delegate for the exception type away from the context of the T/C... This may be a little too adventurous, but the cool part about it is you can inject different handlers depending on scope of reuse and context of utilization.

public interface IExceptionHandler
{
    object Handle(Exception ex);

    void RegisterExceptionTypeHandler<T>(Func<T,object> handlerDelegate) where T : Exception;
}

registration logic

handler.RegisterExceptionTypeHandler<MyException<int>>(ex => ...);
handler.RegisterExceptionTypeHandler<MyException<string>>(ex => ...);

try {
    ...
}catch(Exception ex)
{
    ...any validation
    return exceptionHandler.Handle(ex)
}

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