15

I'm trying the multithread function of Julia 1.3 with the following Hardware:

Model Name: MacBook Pro
Processor Name: Intel Core i7
Processor Speed:    2.8 GHz
Number of Processors:   1
Total Number of Cores:  4
L2 Cache (per Core):    256 KB
L3 Cache:   6 MB
Hyper-Threading Technology: Enabled
Memory: 16 GB

When running the following script:

function F(n)
if n < 2
    return n
    else
        return F(n-1)+F(n-2)
    end
end
@time F(43)

it gives me the following output

2.229305 seconds (2.00 k allocations: 103.924 KiB)
433494437

However when running the following code copied from the Julia page about multithreading

import Base.Threads.@spawn

function fib(n::Int)
    if n < 2
        return n
    end
    t = @spawn fib(n - 2)
    return fib(n - 1) + fetch(t)
end

fib(43)

what happens is that the utilisation of RAM/CPU jumps from 3.2GB/6% to 15GB/25% without any output (for at least 1 minute, after which i decided to kill the julia session)

What am I doing wrong?

2 Answers 2

21

Great question.

This multithreaded implementation of the Fibonacci function is not faster than the single threaded version. That function was only shown in the blog post as a toy example of how the new threading capabilities work, highlighting that it allows for spawning many many threads in different functions and the scheduler will figure out an optimal workload.

The problem is that @spawn has a non-trivial overhead of around 1µs, so if you spawn a thread to do a task that takes less than 1µs, you've probably hurt your performance. The recursive definition of fib(n) has exponential time complexity of order 1.6180^n [1], so when you call fib(43), you spawn something of order 1.6180^43 threads. If each one takes 1µs to spawn, it'll take around 16 minutes just to spawn and schedule the needed threads, and that doesn't even account for the time it takes to do the actual computations and re-merge / sync threads which takes even more time.

Things like this where you spawn a thread for each step of a computation only make sense if each step of the computation takes a long time compared to the @spawn overhead.

Note that there is work going into lessening the overhead of @spawn, but by the very physics of multicore silicon chips I doubt it can ever be fast enough for the above fib implementation.


If you're curious about how we could modify the threaded fib function to actually be beneficial, the easiest thing to do would be to only spawn a fib thread if we think it will take significantly longer than 1µs to run. On my machine (running on 16 physical cores), I get

function F(n)
    if n < 2
        return n
    else
        return F(n-1)+F(n-2)
    end
end


julia> @btime F(23);
  122.920 μs (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

so thats a good two orders of magnitude over the cost of spawning a thread. That seems like a good cutoff to use:

function fib(n::Int)
    if n < 2
        return n
    elseif n > 23
        t = @spawn fib(n - 2)
        return fib(n - 1) + fetch(t)
    else
        return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)
    end
end

now, if I follow proper benchmark methodology with BenchmarkTools.jl [2] I find

julia> using BenchmarkTools

julia> @btime fib(43)
  971.842 ms (1496518 allocations: 33.64 MiB)
433494437

julia> @btime F(43)
  1.866 s (0 allocations: 0 bytes)
433494437

@Anush asks in the comments: This is a factor of 2 speed up using 16 cores it seems. Is it possible to get something closer to a factor of 16 speed up?

Yes it is. The problem with the above function is that the function body is larger than that of F, with lots of conditionals, function / thread spawning and all that. I invite you to compare @code_llvm F(10) @code_llvm fib(10). This means that fib is much harder for julia to optimize. This extra overhead it makes a world of difference for the small n cases.

julia> @btime F(20);
  28.844 μs (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

julia> @btime fib(20);
  242.208 μs (20 allocations: 320 bytes)

Oh no! all that extra code that never gets touched for n < 23 is slowing us down by an order of magnitude! There's an easy fix though: when n < 23, don't recurse down to fib, instead call the single threaded F.

function fib(n::Int)
    if n > 23
       t = @spawn fib(n - 2)
       return fib(n - 1) + fetch(t)
    else
       return F(n)
    end
end

julia> @btime fib(43)
  138.876 ms (185594 allocations: 13.64 MiB)
433494437

which gives a result closer to what we'd expect for so many threads.

[1] https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/time-complexity-recursive-fibonacci-program/

[2] The BenchmarkTools @btime macro from BenchmarkTools.jl will run functions multiple times, skipping the compilation time and average results.

5
  • 1
    This is a factor of 2 speed up using 16 cores it seems. Is it possible to get something closer to a factor of 16 speed up?
    – Simd
    Commented Nov 28, 2019 at 6:37
  • Use a larger base case. BTW, this is how effectively multithreaded programs like FFTW work under the hood as well! Commented Nov 28, 2019 at 10:09
  • Larger base case doesn't help. The trick is that fib is harder for julia to optimize than F, so we just use F instead of fib for n< 23. I edited my answer with a more indepth explanation and example.
    – Mason
    Commented Nov 28, 2019 at 16:01
  • That's weird, I actually got better results using the blog post example...
    – tpdsantos
    Commented Jan 7, 2020 at 17:52
  • @tpdsantos What is the output of Threads.nthreads() for you? I suspect you might have julia running with only a single thread.
    – Mason
    Commented Jan 8, 2020 at 18:13
1

@Anush

As an example of using memoization and multithreading manually

_fib(::Val{1}, _,  _) = 1
_fib(::Val{2}, _, _) = 1

import Base.Threads.@spawn
_fib(x::Val{n}, d = zeros(Int, n), channel = Channel{Bool}(1)) where n = begin
  # lock the channel
  put!(channel, true)
  if d[n] != 0
    res = d[n]
    take!(channel)
  else
    take!(channel) # unlock channel so I can compute stuff
    #t = @spawn _fib(Val(n-2), d, channel)
    t1 =  _fib(Val(n-2), d, channel)
    t2 =  _fib(Val(n-1), d, channel)
    res = fetch(t1) + fetch(t2)

    put!(channel, true) # lock channel
    d[n] = res
    take!(channel) # unlock channel
  end
  return res
end

fib(n) = _fib(Val(n), zeros(Int, n), Channel{Bool}(1))


fib(1)
fib(2)
fib(3)
fib(4)
@time fib(43)


using BenchmarkTools
@benchmark fib(43)

But the speed up came from memmiozation and not so much multithreading. Lesson here is that we should think better algorithms before multithreading.

2
  • The question was never about computing Fibonacci numbers fast. The point was 'why isn't multithreading improving this naïve implementation?'.
    – Mason
    Commented Nov 28, 2019 at 17:37
  • 1
    For me, the next logical question is: how to make it fast. So someone reading this can see my solution and learn from it, perhaps.
    – xiaodai
    Commented Nov 29, 2019 at 2:59

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