5

Let's say I have 5 columns.

pd.DataFrame({
'Column1': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
'Column2': [4, 3, 6, 8, 3, 4, 1, 4, 3],
'Column3': [7, 3, 3, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 7],
'Column4': [9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1],
'Column5': [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]})

Is there a function to know the type of relationship each par of columns has? (one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one, many-to-many)

An output like:

Column1 Column2 many-to-one
Column1 Column3 many-to-one
Column1 Column4 one-to-one
Column1 Column5 many-to-one
Column2 Column3 many-to-many
...
Column4 Column5 many-to-one
3

This should work for you:

df = pd.DataFrame({
'Column1': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
'Column2': [4, 3, 6, 8, 3, 4, 1, 4, 3],
'Column3': [7, 3, 3, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 7],
'Column4': [9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1],
'Column5': [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]})

def get_relation(df, col1, col2):        
    first_max = df[[col1, col2]].groupby(col1).count().max()[0]
    second_max = df[[col1, col2]].groupby(col2).count().max()[0]
    if first_max==1:
        if second_max==1:
            return 'one-to-one'
        else:
            return 'one-to-many'
    else:
        if second_max==1:
            return 'many-to-one'
        else:
            return 'many-to-many'

from itertools import product
for col_i, col_j in product(df.columns, df.columns):
    if col_i == col_j:
        continue
    print(col_i, col_j, get_relation(df, col_i, col_j))

output:

Column1 Column2 one-to-many
Column1 Column3 one-to-many
Column1 Column4 one-to-one
Column1 Column5 one-to-many
Column2 Column1 many-to-one
Column2 Column3 many-to-many
Column2 Column4 many-to-one
Column2 Column5 many-to-many
Column3 Column1 many-to-one
Column3 Column2 many-to-many
Column3 Column4 many-to-one
Column3 Column5 many-to-many
Column4 Column1 one-to-one
Column4 Column2 one-to-many
Column4 Column3 one-to-many
Column4 Column5 one-to-many
Column5 Column1 many-to-one
Column5 Column2 many-to-many
Column5 Column3 many-to-many
Column5 Column4 many-to-one
  • This output is not correct if I dont mistake. Column1 -> Column2 is one-to-many? – Erfan Nov 28 at 16:06
  • 1
    Well, I might agree with you, but this way it follows the convention of the question. You can switch many-to-one and one-to-many if you prefer the other way – Andrea Nov 28 at 16:13
  • 1
    Yes I agree, but for the sake of correctness, I would change it to the correct output, maybe OP was making a mistake. Btw upvoted, good answer +1 – Erfan Nov 28 at 16:22
  • You are right, I swapped them. I also asked to edit the original post, to fix the question as well. Thanks – Andrea Nov 28 at 18:55
  • Hey guys. The convention is one-to-many however for the question I'm interested in the order of the entities. That means the relationship of C1 to C2 is many-to-one and the relationship of C2 to C1 is one-to-many. stackoverflow.com/questions/4601703/… – italo Nov 29 at 1:36
2

This may not be a perfect answer, but it should work with some further modification:

a = df.nunique()
is9, is1 = a==9, a==1
one_one = is9[:, None] & is9
one_many = is1[:, None]
many_one = is1[None, :]
many_many = (~is9[:,None]) & (~is9)

pd.DataFrame(np.select([one_one, one_many, many_one],
                       ['one-to-one', 'one-to-many', 'many-to-one'],
                       'many-to-many'),
             df.columns, df.columns)

Output:

              Column1       Column2       Column3       Column4      Column5
Column1    one-to-one  many-to-many  many-to-many    one-to-one  many-to-one
Column2  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-one
Column3  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-many  many-to-one
Column4    one-to-one  many-to-many  many-to-many    one-to-one  many-to-one
Column5   one-to-many   one-to-many   one-to-many   one-to-many  one-to-many
2

First we get all the combinations of the columns with itertools.product:

Finally we use pd.merge with validate argument to check for which relationship "passes" the test with try, except:

Notice, we leave out many_to_many since this relationship is not "checked", quoted from docs:

“many_to_many” or “m:m”: allowed, but does not result in checks.

from itertools import product

def check_cardinality(df):

    combinations_lst = list(product(df.columns, df.columns))
    relations = ['one_to_one', 'one_to_many', 'many_to_one']

    output = []
    for col1, col2 in combinations_lst:
        for relation in relations:
            try:
                pd.merge(df[[col1]], df[[col2]], left_on=col1, right_on=col2, validate=relation)
                output.append([col1, col2, relation])
            except:
                continue

    return output

cardinality = (pd.DataFrame(check_cardinality(df), columns=['first_column', 'second_column', 'cardinality'])
               .drop_duplicates(['first_column', 'second_column'])
               .reset_index(drop=True))

Output

   first_column second_column  cardinality
0       Column1       Column1   one_to_one
1       Column1       Column2  one_to_many
2       Column1       Column3  one_to_many
3       Column1       Column4   one_to_one
4       Column1       Column5  one_to_many
5       Column2       Column1  many_to_one
6       Column2       Column4  many_to_one
7       Column3       Column1  many_to_one
8       Column3       Column4  many_to_one
9       Column4       Column1   one_to_one
10      Column4       Column2  one_to_many
11      Column4       Column3  one_to_many
12      Column4       Column4   one_to_one
13      Column4       Column5  one_to_many
14      Column5       Column1  many_to_one
15      Column5       Column4  many_to_one
  • wait but how can one relationship have two types? – italo Nov 28 at 15:06
  • Maybe for the purpose of a merge it doesn't matter if its a 1:1 or m:m ? – italo Nov 28 at 15:24
  • 1
    Found the reason, give me a sec and I'll update my answer to correct one @italo – Erfan Nov 28 at 15:34
  • See edit, this should be correct @italo – Erfan Nov 28 at 15:58

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