12

I want to sort a text file through linux sort, that looks like this

v 1006
v10 1
v 1011

I would expect result like this:

v 1006
v 1011
v10 1

However, using sort, even with all kinds of options, the v10 1 line is still in the middle. Why? I would understand v10 1 being either on top on on the bottom (depending if space character is smaller or bigger than 1), but for what reason it is kept in the middle?

16

It uses the system locale to determine the sorting order of letters. My guess is that with your locale, it ignores whitespace.

$ cat foo.txt 
v 1006
v10 1
v 1011
$ LC_ALL=C sort foo.txt
v 1006
v 1011
v10 1
$ LC_ALL=en_US.utf8 sort foo.txt
v 1006
v10 1
v 1011
  • 1
    just a small comment, you don't need to put the ; in LC_ALL=en_US.utf8 ; sort foo.txt. There is a difference in behavior though. If you execute SOME_VAR=foo some_command parameters you are executing some_command with its parameters, and with the env var SOME_VAR being equal to foo, but just for this command. If after returning to the shell you echo $SOME_VAR, it will have the original value, not foo – Carlos Campderrós May 6 '11 at 9:46
  • Oh. OK, I get it now. But.... what is the POINT in ignoring the whitespaces at all? – Karel Bílek May 6 '11 at 9:54
  • Why does -k seem to respect whitespace in LC_ALL=en_US.utf8? e.g. LC_ALL=en_US.utf8 sort -k1,1 foo.txt gives the same behavior as LC_ALL=C sort foo.txt – Featherlegs Oct 27 '16 at 16:49
4

Your locale influences how the lines are sorted. For example I get this with my current locale:

% echo -e "v 1006\nv10 1\nv 1011" | sort
v 1006
v10 1
v 1011

But with C locale I get this:

% echo -e "v 1006\nv10 1\nv 1011" | LC_ALL=C sort
v 1006
v 1011
v10 1

I'm not sure why it behaves that way really. LC_ALL=C is pretty much equivalent to turning off all unexpected processing and going back to the byte-level operations (yeah - I'm skipping the details).

Why do different locale settings skip space is harder to explain though. If anyone can explain that would be good :)

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