3

Summary

I have a Python object hierarchy I want to serialize using JSON (just via https://docs.python.org/3/library/json.html, not using any extra third-party library). I want to exclude certain fields/properties/sub-objects. I'm finding it surprisingly difficult to find a simple answer as to how to achieve this?

Example

I'll have a derived class instance ending up like this:

class MyItemClass(BaseItemClass):
    self.saveThisProperty = 999
    self.dontSaveThisProperty = "Something"
    self.saveThisObject = ObjectType1()
    self.dontSaveThisObject = ObjectType2()

If I were serializing to XML, I would want it to look like

<MyItemClass>
    <saveThisProperty>999</saveThisProperty>
    <saveThisObject>
        ...
    </saveThisObject>
</MyItemClass>

Note that I only serialize certain properties/sub-objects, and I do not want to serialize the whole BaseItemClass from which my class instance is derived.

In XML I'm fine. I know how to output bits of XML as I go along for what I do want, either to a temporary in-memory document which I save at the end or by outputting individual nodes/elements to the stream incrementally. I don't have to serialize everything. E.g.

xmlStream.writeStartElement("MyItemClass")
    xmlStream.writeElementWithValue("saveThisProperty", 999)
    xmlStream.writeStartElement("saveThisObject")
        ...
    xmlStream.writeEndElement("saveThisObject")
xmlStream.writeEndElement("MyItemClass")

For JSON I can't do this, can I? Do I have to create some new, "standalone" object hierarchy (with no derivations from BaseClass) by copying just the properties/sub-objects I want into it and then JSON serialize that?

I did see there is json.dump(default = ...), but that says:

If specified, default should be a function that gets called for objects that can’t otherwise be serialized. It should return a JSON encodable version of the object

However, it is not that the original objects cannot be serialized by default Python->JSON, it is that I do not want that default, serialize-everything behaviour, I want my "selective" one.

5
  • I think you are misunderstanding the json docs: user-defined can't be serialised by default; you need to provide an implementation for default that can serialise them, and that implementation can do whatever you want, as long as the result can be serialised. Nov 30 '19 at 8:11
  • Thank you. And how do you write one single default function for this? My hierarchy will be deep and involve many object classes at various levels. The top level dump() call will not have a function/class available which could possibly know about the classes it will meet, the encoding needs to be delegated to each class as it is encountered...?
    – JonBrave
    Dec 2 '19 at 8:27
  • You could give each class a serialise method that produces the required output, and have default call obj.serialise() on each object it encounters, or use a third party tool like that mentioned in the answer, or marshmallow etc. Dec 2 '19 at 8:33
  • @snakecharmerb We are nearly there! That is what I am doing to get going at present. The question is: do I (a) do a pass through the tree calling serialise() to build a new "shadow, serialisable" single object tree, which is then passed to json.dump() at the end, or (b) does each object's serialise() method return nothing and instead write the serialisation to the stream as it goes, in which case how?
    – JonBrave
    Dec 3 '19 at 8:32
  • 2
    Each object's serialise method should return a dict. json.dumps will visit all the objects in your object graph and attempt to serialise them, calling default if it doesn't know how to serialise the object. You can write default so that calling serialise is a catchall, i.e. no isinstance check Dec 3 '19 at 9:07
4

I am the OP. I post here for clarity what I have ended up using for my case.

I have marked @Sina Rezaei's post in this thread as the Accepted Solution, since that (the last section in his post) and @snakechamerb's comments inspired me to understand what is required.

The outline of my soluton looks like:

class ModelScene(QGraphicsScene):

  # Serialize whole scene to JSON into stream
  def json_serialize(self, stream) -> None:
    # Get `json.dump()` to call `ModelScene.json_serialize_dump_obj()` on every object to be serialized
    json.dump(self, stream, indent=4, default=ModelScene.json_serialize_dump_obj)

  # Static method to be called from `json.dump(default=ModelScene.json_serialize_dump_obj)`
  # This method is called on every object to be dumped/serialized
  @staticmethod
  def json_serialize_dump_obj(obj):
    # if object has a `json_dump_obj()` method call that...
    if hasattr(obj, "json_dump_obj"):
      return obj.json_dump_obj()
    # ...else just allow the default JSON serialization
    return obj

  # Return dict object suitable for serialization via JSON.dump()
  # This one is in `ModelScene(QGraphicsScene)` class
  def json_dump_obj(self) -> dict:
    return {
      "_classname_": self.__class__.__name__,
      "node_data": self.node_data
      }

class CanvasModelData(QAbstractListModel):

  # Return dict object suitable for serialization via JSON.dump()
  # This one is class CanvasModelData(QAbstractListModel)
  def json_dump_obj(self) -> dict:
    _data = {}
    for key, value in self._data.items():
      _data[key] = value
    return {
      "_classname_": self.__class__.__name__,
      "data_type": self.data_type,
      "_data": _data
      }
  • Every "complex" class defines a def json_dump_obj(self) -> dict: method.
  • That method returns just the properties/sub-objects wanted in the serialization.
  • The top-level json.dump(self, stream, default=ModelScene.json_serialize_dump_obj) causes every node visited to be incrementally serialized to stream, via static method ModelScene.json_serialize_dump_obj. And that calls my obj.json_dump_obj() if available, else default JSON serialization of basic object type.

Interestingly, I came across someone with the same concerns as me. From What is the difference between json.dump() and json.dumps() in python?, solution https://stackoverflow.com/a/57087055/489865:

In memory usage and speed.

When you call jsonstr = json.dumps(mydata) it first creates a full copy of your data in memory and only then you file.write(jsonstr) it to disk. So this is a faster method but can be a problem if you have a big piece of data to save.

When you call json.dump(mydata, file) -- without 's', new memory is not used, as the data is dumped by chunks. But the whole process is about 2 times slower.

Source: I checked the source code of json.dump() and json.dumps() and also tested both the variants measuring the time with time.time() and watching the memory usage in htop.

2

I can think of three solutions for your situation:

Solution 1: Use Pykson third party library and define the fields you want to be serialized as pykson fields.

Sample:

class MyItemClass(pykson.JsonObject):
    saved_property = pykson.IntegerField()

my_object = MyItemClass(saved_property=1, accept_unknown=True)
my_object.unsaved_property = 2
pykson.Pykson().to_json(my_object)

disclaimer: I am developer of pykson library.

Solution 2: The second solution is to use a wrapper class with custom default deserializer.

class ObjectWrapper:
    def __init__(self, value, should_serialize=False)
        self.value = value
        self.should_serialize = should_serialize

def default_handler(obj):
    if isinstance(obj, ObjectWrapper):
        if obj.should_serialize:
            return obj.value
        else:
            return None
    else:
        raise TypeError

json.dump(default=default_handler)

Solution 3: It might be a bad idea but if you have a in case of deep hierarchy, you can also add a function to allc classes which will be serialized and use this function to get a dictionary and easily convert the dictionary to json.

class MyChildClass:
     def __init__(self, serialized_property, not_serialized_property):
        self.serialized_property = serialized_property
        self.not_serialized_property = not_serialized_property

     def to_dict(self):
        # only add serialized property here
        return {
            "serialized_property": self.serialized_property
        }

class MyParentClass:
    def __init__(self, child_property, some_other_property):
        self.child_property = child_property
        self.some_other_property = some_other_property

    def to_dict(self):
        return {
            'child_property': self.child_property.to_dict(),
            'some_other_property': self.some_other_property
        }

my_child_object = MyChildClass(serialized_property=1, not_serialized_property=2)
my_parent_object = MyParentClass(child_property=my_child_object, some_other_property='some string here')
json.dumps(my_parent_object.to_dict())

Or you can achieve same result using default handler:

class MyChildClass:
     def __init__(self, serialized_property, not_serialized_property):
        self.serialized_property = serialized_property
        self.not_serialized_property = not_serialized_property

     def to_dict(self):
        # only add serialized property here
        return {
            "serialized_property": self.serialized_property
        }

class MyParentClass:
    def __init__(self, child_property, some_other_property):
        self.child_property = child_property
        self.some_other_property = some_other_property

    def to_dict(self):
        return {
            'child_property': self.child_property,
            'some_other_property': self.some_other_property
        }

def handle_default(obj):
    if isinstance(obj, MyChildClass):
        return obj.to_dict()
    elif isinstance(obj, MyParentClass):
        return obj.to_dict()
    return None

my_child_object = MyChildClass(serialized_property=1, not_serialized_property=2)
my_parent_object = MyParentClass(child_property=my_child_object, some_other_property='some string here')
json.dumps(my_parent_object, default=handle_default)
4
  • Thank you. I'm afraid I don't want to use anyone's library, so would need Solution #2. I don't understand how you intend it to be used. And struggling on dump(default=function) vs dump(cls=alternative_JSONEncoder). My hierarchy will be deep and involve many object classes at various levels. The top level dump() call will not have a function/class available which could possibly know about the classes it will meet, the encoding needs to be delegated to each class as it is encountered...?
    – JonBrave
    Dec 2 '19 at 8:25
  • @JonBrave Check my edit, maybe it helps if you have a limited number of predefined class types. Dec 2 '19 at 21:54
  • Also there might be another solution to use specific names for not serialized variables and skip those names. Check this: stackoverflow.com/a/55151894/5528269 Dec 2 '19 at 21:55
  • 1
    OK, this is like what I am doing now. Your to_dict() is called first in a pass to build a "shadow, serializable" object hierarchy, then finally a single call the json.dump() of that hierarchy is made. It does not write to the serialization stream as it goes. I cannot have some single handle_default method in a module as it would not even know what classes it will encounter in order to write isinstance(obj, SomeClass), the classes will be defined all over the place in various modules. I am using if hasattr(obj, "to_dict"): return obj.to_dict() to make it generic.
    – JonBrave
    Dec 3 '19 at 8:44

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