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Been playing around with Go, Goroutines and Channels for some days now.

After lots of practice and some help in here, related to Goroutines and error handling (How to handle errors and terminate Goroutine using WaitGroup), I have now hit an issue that I can't figure out how to solve.

The issue is that I want to create a Mapper, that has a function which accepts a chan of any type. I have tried to solve this the only way that I can think of, by passing in chan interface{} instead of the real type, but this does clearly not work. (Shown in the example below)

So I am looking for the correct way of doing this and some confirmation that this is even the correct way to go.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/sync/errgroup"
)

var g errgroup.Group

// ItemOne struct
type ItemOne struct {
    N int
}

func main() {
    m := &Mapper{}

    itemsOne, err := mapItemOne(m)
    if err != nil {
        // Handle error...
    }
    fmt.Println(itemsOne)

    itemsTwo, err := mapItemTwo(m)
    if err != nil {
        // Handle error...
    }
    fmt.Println(itemsOne)
}

func mapItemOne(m *Mapper) ([]*ItemOne, error){
    c := make(chan *ItemOne, 10)
    data := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

    g.Go(func() error {
        return m.mapItems(c, data)
    })

    mappedItems := make([]*ItemOne, 0)
    for elem := range c {
        mappedItems = append(mappedItems, elem)
    }

    err := g.Wait()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }

    return mappedItems, nil
}


// ItemTwo struct
type ItemTwo struct {
    N int
}

func mapItemTwo(m *Mapper) ([]*ItemTwo, error){
    c := make(chan *ItemTwo, 10)
    data := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

    g.Go(func() error {
        return m.mapItems(c, data)
    })

    mappedItems := make([]*ItemTwo, 0)
    for elem := range c {
        mappedItems = append(mappedItems, elem)
    }

    err := g.Wait()
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }

    return mappedItems, nil
}

// Mapper struct
type Mapper struct {}

func (m *Mapper) mapItems(c chan *interface{}, data []int) error {
    defer close(c)

    // Imagine that something here can error...
    for _, v := range data {
        fmt.Println(v)
        item := &ItemOne{
            N: v,
        }

        c <- item
    } 

    return nil  
}

Example that works with (ItemTwo code commented out): https://play.golang.org/p/PlqPflP7Yf7

Example that does not work (ItemTwo code commented in): https://play.golang.org/p/xM89GVY2BoX

I have included two examples at playground here. First one works, but second is broken due to ItemTwo code being active.

Hope someone can point me in the right direction here. Thanks.

8
  • In the question it clearly says ... by passing in chan interface{} instead of the real type, but this does clearly not work. (Shown in the example below)
    – Severin
    Nov 29, 2019 at 15:08
  • 1
    Ah, apologies, I jumped straight to the executable code Nov 29, 2019 at 15:09
  • No problem. I know it's hard with three different examples. It's just really hard to describe something I'm not a 100% sure of.
    – Severin
    Nov 29, 2019 at 15:10
  • 1
    @SeverinDK If using reflection is an option you can use interface{} instead of chan interface{}: play.golang.org/p/riMtNoIHKYk
    – mkopriva
    Nov 29, 2019 at 16:22
  • 1
    @SeverinDK it's slower then using concrete types and it is harder to understand. In general I think most problems in Go have pretty neat solutions that do not require reflection (nor code generation), and some of them are less than neat but still preferable to reflection... then there are those problems to which reflection is the more sensible approach.
    – mkopriva
    Nov 29, 2019 at 18:36

1 Answer 1

2

The issue is that I want to create a Mapper, that has a function which accepts a chan of any type.

You simply cannot do that in Go's type system. You have to decide on the type and if the type is interface you are stuck with that exact type and all function signature must match. There is no co/contravariance in Go.

Best advice: Stop trying to write generic code. This is doable but it is ugly, slow and complicated.

3
  • So rather just have a bit of duplicated code for each type?
    – Severin
    Nov 29, 2019 at 15:25
  • @SeverinDK yes of course. What would be wrong with that?
    – Volker
    Nov 29, 2019 at 16:18
  • I guess I'm just so used to avoiding it from languages such as PHP, that I usually work with.
    – Severin
    Nov 29, 2019 at 17:47

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