4

To bx to a Thumb function, the least significant bit of the address needs to be set. The GNU as documentation states how this works when the address is generated from an adr pseudo-instruction:

adr <register> <label>

This instruction will load the address of label into the indicated register. [...]

If label is a thumb function symbol, and thumb interworking has been enabled via the -mthumb-interwork option then the bottom bit of the value stored into register will be set. This allows the following sequence to work as expected:

adr r0, thumb_function

blx r0

So it sounds like things should just work. However, looking at some disassembly, it seems like certain addresses do not have that bottom bit set.

For example, assembling and linking:

.syntax unified
.thumb

.align 2
table:
    .4byte f1
    .4byte f2
    .4byte f3

.align 2
.type f1, %function
.thumb_func
f1:
    adr r1, f1
    adr r2, f2
    adr r3, f3
    bx r1

.align 2
.type f2, %function
.thumb_func
f2:
    adr r1, f1
    adr r2, f2
    adr r3, f3
    bx r2

.align 2
.type f3, %function
.thumb_func
f3:
    adr r1, f1
    adr r2, f2
    adr r3, f3
    bx r3

With:

arm-none-eabi-as adr_test.s -mthumb -mthumb-interwork -o adr_test.o
arm-none-eabi-ld adr_test.o

And checking with arm-none-eabi-objdump -D a.out, I get:

00008000 <table>:
    8000:   0000800d    .word   0x0000800d
    8004:   00008019    .word   0x00008019
    8008:   00008025    .word   0x00008025

0000800c <f1>:
    800c:   f2af 0103   subw    r1, pc, #3
    8010:   a201        add r2, pc, #4  ; (adr r2, 8018 <f2>)
    8012:   a304        add r3, pc, #16 ; (adr r3, 8024 <f3>)
    8014:   4708        bx  r1
    8016:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

00008018 <f2>:
    8018:   f2af 010f   subw    r1, pc, #15
    801c:   f2af 0207   subw    r2, pc, #7
    8020:   a300        add r3, pc, #0  ; (adr r3, 8024 <f3>)
    8022:   4710        bx  r2

00008024 <f3>:
    8024:   f2af 011b   subw    r1, pc, #27
    8028:   f2af 0213   subw    r2, pc, #19
    802c:   f2af 030b   subw    r3, pc, #11
    8030:   4718        bx  r3
    8032:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

There are a few things to note:

  1. In table, the absolute addresses of f1, f2, and f3 are all odd, as expected. So, clearly, the assembler and linker know that those three functions should be Thumb.
  2. For backward references, where the adr pseudo-instruction assembles down to a subw, the offset is odd, as expected.
  3. But for forward references, where the adr pseudo-instruction assembles to an add, the offset is even.

What am I missing?

15
  • Have you tried looking at GCC output for some C code (e.g. for a static or local array of function pointers) to see if there are extra directives it uses to make sure the assembler knows it's a function symbol? Or if it turns out the asm does't get odd addresses after all in that case? Nov 29, 2019 at 19:54
  • 1
    adr.w produces a T3 variant as described in the armv7-m docs. Which allows for any offset from 0 to 4095 not limited to powers of four like the T1 encoding
    – old_timer
    Nov 29, 2019 at 22:56
  • 1
    without unified syntax it is generating the t1 encoding for me not the t3.
    – old_timer
    Nov 29, 2019 at 23:08
  • 2
    @PeterCordes the C compilers dont generate the adr instruction they solve this other ways either a word that is filled in by the linker and used with a pc-relative load, or a trampoline (gnu ld does have an issue with trampolines so dont rely on them). Or if you simply want the address in C code again a word is set aside and patched in by the linker and a pc-relative load is used. There are bugs/issues with the C compiler when using function pointers as have been seen here at SO.
    – old_timer
    Nov 29, 2019 at 23:21
  • 1
    @old_timer I have. No reply as of Dec. 13 2019. sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=25235
    – Maxpm
    Dec 13, 2019 at 18:55

3 Answers 3

3

What you're missing is this line from the ARM documentation for the ADR pseudo-instruction:

If you use ADR to generate a target for a BX or BLX instruction, it is your responsibility to set the Thumb bit (bit 0) of the address if the target contains Thumb instructions.

The forward referencing ADR instructions use the 16-bit Thumb "ADD Rd, pc, #imm" form of the ADD instruction. The immediate for this instruction is in the range of 0-1020 and must be word aligned (ie. its encoded with an 8-bit field and multiplied by 4.) The PC value used also has the lower two bits set to 0, so it is incapable of generating an odd address.

Forcing the assembler to always use a 32-bit Thumb instruction with ADR.W should cause it to always generate an odd address when a function label is used, but I don't know if you can depend on this. It would probably be better to just to set the lower bit explicitly.

6
  • I did see that line from the ARM docs, but I read my excerpt from the GNU docs as superseding that – especially since they use adr r0, thumb_function; blx r0 as an example of something that works "as expected." Those details on the instruction encoding are interesting. If it's actually architecturally impossible for a narrow ADR instruction to work properly in Thumb, then the docs should warn about that. I will try to bring it up on the mailing list.
    – Maxpm
    Nov 30, 2019 at 1:24
  • @Maxpm Unfortunately, the GNU Assembler documentation isn't a very reliable source on how the GNU Assembler actually works. My guess is that in the past the the assembler did work as documented and always used the 32-bit encoding that's capable of generating odd addresses, but at some point was fixed to match the official ARM behaviour without updating the documentation.
    – Ross Ridge
    Nov 30, 2019 at 2:13
  • That sounds plausible. I've ticketed this on Bugzilla, so I guess we'll see.
    – Maxpm
    Nov 30, 2019 at 3:13
  • gas appears to be broken for ARM, T16 and T32, the code checks for a symbol before the symbol has been found/defined in the code and as a result does not put the adjustment in. So someone tried to do it but failed to complete the task. already defined labels appear to work but forward, not yet defined do not.
    – old_timer
    Dec 30, 2019 at 10:04
  • My experience with bugs against GNU folks is not that great they either dont care to look at it. Dont have the experience to understand it and simply close it as not a bug. Or even better years later when someone else found it, mine, filed years before was marked as a duplicate of the one filed later. Understanding that GNU is a good sized body of people across many tools and you get what you get on a particular day.
    – old_timer
    Dec 30, 2019 at 10:07
2

This was a bug in the GNU Assembler (gas). It should be fixed in v2.37.

1

Coming back to this question. The bug is truly this simple:

  if (inst.relocs[0].exp.X_op == O_symbol
      && inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol != NULL
      && S_IS_DEFINED (inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol)
      && THUMB_IS_FUNC (inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol))
    inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_number += 1;

in the do_t_adr() function.

S_IS_DEFINED does a check to see if the symbol is defined, when doing a forward reference at this point in time the symbol is not defined, so that line does not pass, it does not add one which is very disturbing for cleanliness it should ORR one, but whatever. For backwards reference the symbol is defined so the adjustment is made. (Naturally the THUMB_IS_FUNC won't work either without a defined symbol)

The ADR is converted into a BFD_RELOC_ARM_THUMB_ADD. Which takes us here:

case BFD_RELOC_ARM_THUMB_ADD:
  /* This is a complicated relocation, since we use it for all of
 the following immediate relocations:

    3bit ADD/SUB
    8bit ADD/SUB
    9bit ADD/SUB SP word-aligned
   10bit ADD PC/SP word-aligned

 The type of instruction being processed is encoded in the
 instruction field:

   0x8000  SUB
   0x00F0  Rd
   0x000F  Rs
  */

and within that here:

else if (rs == REG_PC || rs == REG_SP)
  {
    /* PR gas/18541.  If the addition is for a defined symbol
       within range of an ADR instruction then accept it.  */

And that code which happens on a later pass (after the symbol has been defined and can be found) does not patch up the immediate/offset.

I find it even more disturbing/buggy that it can't handle this without .syntax unified.

.thumb
.thumb_func
zero:
    adr r0,zero

Even with .syntax unified they didn't finish implementing ADR for T16. Just put an error in there and called it done. (It can certainly be implemented in T16 add rx,pc,#0, sub rx,#offset for example.)

Even if they fixed it I would avoid the ADR instruction. But it is clear they didn't bother to actually finish implementing this pseudo instruction.

Note in arm mode they have the same bug, checking for the symbol at the wrong time.

  if (support_interwork
      && inst.relocs[0].exp.X_op == O_symbol
      && inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol != NULL
      && S_IS_DEFINED (inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol)
      && THUMB_IS_FUNC (inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_symbol))
    inst.relocs[0].exp.X_add_number |= 1;

Note the ORR not ADD of one, better/different author, but didn't quite think this solution through.

If I remove the S_IS_DEFINED and THUMB_IS_FUNC checks:

.arm
zero:
    adr r0,two
.thumb
.thumb_func
two:
    nop

goes from:

00000000 <zero>:
   0:   e24f0004    sub r0, pc, #4

00000004 <two>:
   4:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
   6:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

to:

00000000 <zero>:
   0:   e24f0003    sub r0, pc, #3

00000004 <two>:
   4:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
   6:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

Likewise:

.syntax unified

.thumb
    adr r0,two
    nop
    nop
.thumb_func
two:
    nop

gives:

00000000 <two-0x8>:
   0:   f20f 0005   addw    r0, pc, #5
   4:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
   6:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

00000008 <two>:
   8:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

Note this could have been easily implemented using T16 instructions (uses 4 bytes just like the T32 solution), but that is as mentioned yet another bug:

.syntax unified
.cpu cortex-m0
.thumb
    adr r0,two
    nop
    nop
.thumb_func
two:
    nop

/path/so.s: Assembler messages:
/path/so.s:5: Error: invalid immediate for address calculation (value = 0x00000003)

(and that bug is in the same section of code that has this bug you pointed out)

It would be interesting to see first what the documentation for other assemblers says with respect to ADR and thumb, and second if they actually implement it per that documentation and/or bail out with an error or warning.

11
  • The ARM documentation says that "For forward references, ADR without .W always generates a 16-bit instruction in Thumb code, even if that results in failure for an address that could be generated in a 32-bit Thumb-2 ADD instruction" so your "bug fix" breaks this.
    – Ross Ridge
    Dec 30, 2019 at 20:00
  • Its the reverse reference that does not generate T16 in any case for GAS not the forward, the forward generates a T16 "without the .w" but the immediate is wrong.
    – old_timer
    Dec 31, 2019 at 1:22
  • the size of the instruction is not the issue here, this pseudo instruction can be constructed correctly for all thumb variants, using T32 instructions or T16, could technically support any range if they chose to. The ARM documentation needs work in this specific area as to what their intent was instead of the assembler having to choose. Unfortunately we are stuck with having to rely on the assembler or even better simply dont use ADR, easy to live without.
    – old_timer
    Dec 31, 2019 at 1:30
  • No, it's correct according to the ARM documentation. The ARM documentation doesn't require that it generate an odd address, but it does require a single 16-bit instruction be generated for forward references.
    – Ross Ridge
    Dec 31, 2019 at 1:31
  • 1
    I'm happy to accept this answer if you feel like adding an intro to it, like: "This is left ambiguous by the ARM architecture, but if you're using the GNU assembler, its docs specifically say that it should work. The GNU assembler folks have recognized the fact that it doesn't work as a bug. What follows is my commentary on what I think the details of the bug are."
    – Maxpm
    Jan 9, 2021 at 20:34

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